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nothing

nothing nothing comes of nothing proverbial saying, late 14th century; the saying is found earlier in Greek, in the work of the Greek lyric poet Alcaeus (c.620–c.580 bc).
nothing for nothing proverbial saying, early 18th century, summarizing the attitude that nothing will be offered unless a return is assured.
nothing is certain but death and taxes proverbial saying, early 18th century, summarizing what in life is inevitable and inescapable.
nothing is certain but the unforeseen proverbial saying, late 19th century, a similar thought to the unexpected always happens.
nothing is for ever no state or condition is permanent; saying recorded from the late 20th century.
nothing should be done in haste but gripping a flea proverbial saying, mid 17th century, used as a warning against rash action.
nothing so bad but it might have been worse proverbial saying, late 19th century, used in resignation or consolation; a more positive version is found earlier in Sir Walter Scott's Rob Roy (1817), ‘There's naething sae gude on this side o' time but it might hae been better.’
nothing so bold as a blind mare Scottish proverbial saying, early 17th century, meaning that those who know least about a situation are least likely to be deterred by it.
nothing succeeds like success proverbial saying, mid 19th century, meaning that someone already regarded as successful is likely to attract more support.
nothing venture, nothing gain proverbial saying, early 17th century, a later variant of nothing venture, nothing have.
nothing venture, nothing have proverbial saying, late 14th century, meaning that one must be prepared to take some risks to achieve a desired end. An earlier version of nothing venture, nothing gain.
there is nothing new under the sun proverbial saying, late 16th century; with biblical allusion to Ecclesiastes 1:9, ‘There is no new thing under the sun’.
there is nothing so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse proverbial saying, early 20th century, recommending the healthful effects of horse-riding.
you ain't seen nothing yet there is something even more extreme or impressive in store. Often with allusion to Al Jolson's ‘you ain't heard nuttin' yet,’ used as an aside in the 1927 film The Jazz Singer.

See also blessed is he who expects nothing, double or nothing, have nothing to lose, neck or nothing, something is better than nothing.

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nothing

noth·ing / ˈnə[unvoicedth]ing/ • pron. not anything; no single thing: I said nothing | there's nothing you can do | they found nothing wrong. ∎  something of no importance or concern: “What are you laughing at?” “Oh, nothing, sir.” | they are nothing to him | [as n.] no longer could we be treated as nothings. ∎  (in calculations) no amount; zero. • adj. inf. having no prospect of progress; of no value: he had a series of nothing jobs. • adv. not at all: she cares nothing for others | he looks nothing like the others. ∎ inf. used to contradict something emphatically: “This is a surprise.” “Surprise nothing.” PHRASES: be nothing to do with see do1 . for nothing 1. at no cost; without payment: working for nothing. 2. to no purpose: he died anyway; so it had all been for nothing. have nothing on someone see have. have nothing to do with see do1 . no nothing inf. (concluding a list of negatives) nothing at all: how could you solve it with no clues, no witnesses, no nothing? not for nothing for a very good reason: not for nothing have I got a brother-in-law who cooks professionally. nothing but only: nothing but the best will do. nothing daunted see daunt. nothing doing inf. 1. there is no prospect of success or agreement: He wants to marry her. Nothing doing! 2. nothing is happening: there's nothing doing, and I've been waiting for weeks. nothing (or nothing else) for it Brit. no alternative: there was nothing for it but to follow. nothing less than used to emphasize how extreme something is: it was nothing less than sexual harassment. nothing loath quite willing. nothing much not a great amount; nothing of importance. there is nothing to it there is no difficulty involved. stop at nothing see stop. sweet nothings words of affection exchanged by lovers: whispering sweet nothings in her ear. think nothing of it do not apologize or feel bound to show gratitude (used as a polite response). you ain't seen nothing yet inf. used to indicate that although something may be considered extreme or impressive, there is something even more extreme or impressive in store: if you think that was muddy, you ain't seen nothing yet.

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nothing

nothing OE. nān þing, ME. np̄ þing, later nō ping; see NO2, THING.
Hence nothingness XVII.

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nothing

nothing •pennyfarthing • plaything •silversmithing • anything •everything • northing • nothing •something • rebirthing • farthing •scathing • sheathing •tithing, writhing •southing • clothing • underclothing •Worthing • carving • woodcarving •delving •craving, engraving, paving, raving, saving, shaving •self-deceiving, unbelieving, weaving •living, misgiving, thanksgiving, unforgiving •skydiving • piledriving • coving •approving, reproving, unmoving •unloving •Irving, serving, unswerving •time-serving • lapwing • waxwing •batwing • redwing • lacewing •beeswing • forewing • downswing •outswing • viewing • upswing •underwing • phrasing • stargazing •trailblazing • hellraising • unpleasing •rising, surprising •self-aggrandizing • uncompromising •unpatronizing • uprising •enterprising • appetizing •Dowsing, housing •unimposing •amusing, confusing, musing

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