meet

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meet1 / mēt/ • v. (past and past part. met / met/ ) [tr.] 1. come into the presence or company of (someone) by chance or arrangement: a week later I met him in the street | [intr.] we met for lunch they arranged to meet up that afternoon. ∎  make the acquaintance of (someone) for the first time: she took Paul to meet her parents | [intr.] we met at an office party. ∎  [intr.] (of a group of people) assemble for a particular purpose: the committee meets once a week. ∎  [intr.] (meet with) have a meeting with (someone): he met with the president on September 16. ∎  go to a place and wait there for (a person or their means of transport) to arrive: I offered to meet their train. ∎  play or oppose in a contest: in the final match, the U.S. will meet Brazil | [intr.] the Twins and Mariners will not meet again until September. ∎  touch; join: Harry's lips met hers | [intr.] the curtains failed to meet in the middle | fig. our eyes met across the table. ∎  encounter or be faced with (a particular fate, situation, attitude, or reaction): he met his death in 1946 | [intr.] we met with a slight setback. ∎  (meet something with) have (a particular reaction) to: the announcement was met with widespread protests. ∎  [intr.] (meet with) receive (a particular reaction): I'm sorry if it doesn't meet with your approval.2. fulfill or satisfy (a need, requirement, or condition): this policy is doing nothing to meet the needs of women. ∎  deal with or respond to (a problem or challenge) satisfactorily: they failed to meet the noon deadline. ∎  pay (a financial claim or obligation): all your household expenses will still have to be met.• n. an organized event at which a number of races or other sporting contests are held: a swim meet.PHRASES: meet someone's eye (or eyes) be visible: the sight that met his eyes was truly amazing.meet someone's eye (or eyes or gaze) look directly at someone: for a moment, he refused to meet her eyes.meet someone halfway make a compromise with someone: I am prepared to meet him halfway by paying an additional $25,000.meet one's Makersee maker.meet one's matchsee match1 .there's more to someone/something than meets the eye a person or situation is more complex or interesting than they appear.meet2 • adj. archaic suitable; fit; proper: it is a theater meet for great events.DERIVATIVES: meet·ly adv.meet·ness n.

meet

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meet do not meet troubles half-way proverbial saying, late 19th century, warning against anxiety about something that has not yet happened; the Roman philosopher and poet Seneca the Younger (c.4 bc–ad 65) has, ‘what help is it to run out to meet your troubles?’ A similar idea is found in Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing (1599), ‘Are you come to meet your trouble? The fashion of the world is to avoid cost.’ (Compare never trouble trouble till trouble troubles you.)

See also when Greek meets Greek.

meet

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meet1 † made to fit XIII; (rhet.) suitable, fit XIV. Aphetic of earlier ME. imete :- OE. (Angl.) *ġemēte, (WS.) ġemǣte = OHG. gamāzi (G. gemäss), f. *ʒa- Y- + *mǣtō measure, f. *mǣt- *met- measure, METE; the etymol. sense is ‘commensurate’.

meet

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meet2 pt., pp. met come or light upon OE.; come face to face or into contact with XIII. OE. mētan, also ġemētan (see Y-) = OS. mōtian (Du. moeten), ON. mœ̄ta, Goth. gamōtjan :- Gmc. *(ʒa)mōtjan, f. *mōtam meeting, MOOT.
Hence meeting XIII.

Meet

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Meet

the persons or group of men or women who gather for a fox hunt or other sporting event.

Examples: a meet of cyclists; of huntsmen.