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polyp

polyp, in medicine, a benign tumor occurring in areas lined with mucous membrane such as the nose, gastrointestinal tract (especially the colon), and the uterus. Some polyps are pedunculated tumors, i.e., they grow on stems; others, attached by a broad base, are called sessile. Nasal polyps are usually associated with an allergic condition; since they interfere with breathing, it is advisable that they be removed. Uterine and gastrointestinal polyps are likely to cause bleeding, but, more important, they may undergo malignant degeneration and for this reason are also usually removed.

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polyp

polyp (path.) polypus XIV; †octopus, cuttle-fish, or the like XVI; applied gen. to animals of low organization XVIII. — F. polype — L. polypus (see next).

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polyp

polyp In medicine, swollen mass projecting from the wall of a cavity lined with mucous membrane, such as the nose. Some growths can be cancerous.

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polyp

polyp The soft-bodied, usually sedentary form of Cnidaria, consisting of a cylindrical trunk which is fixed at one end, with the mouth surrounded by tentacles at the other end. In Siphonophora the polyp has been modified for a pelagic, colonial existence.

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polyp

polyp The soft-bodied, usually sedentary form of Cnidaria, consisting of a cylindrical trunk which is fixed at one end, with the mouth surrounded by tentacles at the other end. In Siphonophora the polyp has been modified for a pelagic, colonial existence.

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polyp

polyp Body type of various species of animal within the phylum Cnidaria. It has a mouth surrounded by extensible tentacles, and a lower end that is adapted for attachment to a surface. It is distinct from the free-swimming medusa. It may be solitary, as in the sea anemone, but is more often an individual of a colonial organism such as coral.

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polyp

polypblip, chip, clip, dip, drip, equip, flip, grip, gyp, harelip, hip, kip, lip, nip, outstrip, pip, quip, rip, scrip, ship, sip, skip, slip, snip, strip, tip, toodle-pip, trip, whip, yip, zip •biochip • microchip • woodchip •sheepdip • skinny-dip • rosehip •landslip • payslip •fillip, Philip •gymslip • side-slip • polyp • oxlip •cowslip • pillowslip •julep, tulip •Cudlipp • paperclip • catnip • parsnip •turnip • handgrip • cantrip • hairgrip •airstrip • filmstrip • kirby grip •weatherstrip • gossip • airship •midship • kinship • godship • warship •gunship • worship • wingtip •fingertip • horsewhip • bullwhip •bunyip

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polyp

polyp The sedentary stage in the life cycle of the Cnidaria, consisting of a cylindrical body fixed at one end to a firm base and having a mouth surrounded by a ring of tentacles at the other. Some polyps (e.g. Hydra) are single; others (e.g. the corals and Obelia) form colonies. Polyps typically reproduce asexually by budding to form either new polyps or medusae. The latter reproduce sexually giving rise to new polyps. Sea anemones are solitary polyps that reproduce sexually to form new polyps.

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polyp

polyp (polypus) (pol-ip) n. a growth, usually benign, protruding from a mucous membrane. Polyps are commonly found in the nose and sinuses, giving rise to obstruction, chronic infection, and discharge. Other sites include the ear, the stomach, and the colon, where they may eventually become malignant. Polyps are usually removed surgically (see polypectomy). juvenile p. a polyp that occurs in the intestine (usually colon or rectum) of infants or young people; sometimes they are multiple (see polyposis). Most juvenile polyps are benign. See also Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

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polyp

pol·yp / ˈpäləp/ • n. 1. Zool. a solitary or colonial sedentary form of a coelenterate such as a sea anemone, typically having a columnar body with the mouth uppermost surrounded by a ring of tentacles. In some species, polyps are a phase in the life cycle that alternates with a medusoid phase. Compare with medusa. 2. Med. a small growth, typically benign and with a stalk, protruding from a mucous membrane. DERIVATIVES: pol·yp·ous / ˈpäləpəs/ adj. (in sense 2).

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