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score

score / skôr/ • n. 1. the number of points, goals, runs, etc., achieved in a game: the final score was 25–16 in favor of Washington. ∎  the number of points, goals, runs, etc., achieved by an individual player or a team in a game: his highest score of the season. ∎ inf. an act of gaining a point, goal, or run in a game. ∎  a rating or grade, such as a mark achieved in a test: an IQ score of 161. ∎  (the score) inf. the state of affairs; the real facts about the present situation: “Hey, what's the score here, what's goin' on?” ∎ inf. an act of buying illegal drugs. 2. (pl. same) a group or set of twenty or about twenty: a score of men lost their lives in the battle. ∎  (scores of) a large amount or number of something: he sent scores of enthusiastic letters to friends. 3. a written representation of a musical composition showing all the vocal and instrumental parts arranged one below the other. ∎  the music composed for a movie or play. 4. a notch or line cut or scratched into a surface. • v. [tr.] 1. gain (a point, goal, run, etc.) in a competitive game: Penn State scored two touchdowns in the fourth quarter. ∎  decide on the score to be awarded to (a competitor): the judge must score each dog against this standard. ∎  gain (a number of points) for a competitor; be worth: each correct answer scores ten points. ∎  decide on the scores to be awarded in (a game or competition). ∎  [intr.] record the score during a game; act as scorer. ∎  Baseball cause (a teammate) to score: McNab singled, scoring Reynolds and Diaz. ∎ inf. secure (a success or an advantage): the band scored a hit single. ∎  [intr.] inf. be successful: his new movie scored big. ∎ inf. buy or acquire (something, typically illegal drugs): Sally had scored some acid. ∎  [intr.] inf. succeed in attracting a sexual partner, typically for a casual encounter. 2. orchestrate or arrange (a piece of music), typically for a specified instrument or instruments: the Quartet Suite was scored for flute, violin, viola da gamba, and continuo. ∎  compose the music for (a movie or play). 3. cut or scratch a notch or line on (a surface): score the card until you cut through. PHRASES: know the score inf. be aware of the essential facts about a situation. on that (or this) score so far as that (or this) is concerned: my priority was to blend new faces into the team, and we have succeeded on that score. score points outdo another person, esp. in an argument. settle a (or the) score take revenge on someone for a past act. DERIVATIVES: score·less adj. scor·er n.

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score

score, in musical notation, manuscript or printed music in which the various parts are placed one above the other so that notes that are to be played simultaneously are in vertical alignment. Early polyphony was notated in score until the early 13th cent., when choir books, in which the parts were written out separately one after another, came into use. Part books, with a separate book for each part, were employed in the 16th and 17th cent. With the rise of opera music around the beginning of the 17th cent., the modern score came into being, with bar lines scored from top to bottom through all the staffs. A full score is one such as an orchestral conductor uses, in which each part is on a separate staff, while in a condensed score two or more parts are written on a single staff. Full scores are also printed in miniature pocket editions. In a vocal score or piano-vocal score of an opera or a choral work, the vocal parts are written out in full but the accompaniment is reduced to two staffs.

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score

score. A mus.-copy which shows in ordered form the parts allotted to the various performers, as distinct from ‘parts’ which show only that of one performer. Thus to speak of score and parts means a comprehensive copy, used by the cond., and separate copies for individual instrs. and singers. A full score shows all the parts separately displayed. A vocal score gives all the v. parts of a choral work or opera with the orch. parts reduced to a pf. part. Short score is a stage in comp. where the composer may write out his mus. giving indications (but not full details) of scoring and harmonization. Mahler's 10th Sym. was left mainly in short score. A piano score is a reduction to a pf. part of all the parts of a work. A miniature, study, or pocket score is a full score issued in a handy size for study or for following a work at a concert. Conds. who know a work very well (and have good eyesight) sometimes use a miniature score.

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score

score
A. set of twenty (prob. orig. as marked on a tally) XI;

B. notch, mark, stroke; account of times kept on a tally or board XIV; amount of a bill or reckoning XVI; account, reason XVII; record of points in a game XVIII;

C. written or printed piece of concerted music XVIII. Late OE. *scoru, pl. scora, -e — ON. skor notch, tally, twenty :- Gmc *skurō, f. *skur- *sker- cut. SHEAR.

So score vb. XIV. partly — ON. skora; partly f. the sb.

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Score

Score

a group or set of twenty; a weight of 20 or 21 pounds used in weighing pigs, oxen, and other commodities.

Examples : score of bachelors (from the phrase to score)Lipton, 1970; flour (20 lb.), 1858; of people.

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score

score a group or set of twenty or about twenty. The word comes in late Old English from Old Norse skor ‘notch, tally, twenty’, of Germanic origin.

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score

score To make shallow cuts in the surface of food in order to improve its flavour and appearance or to cook more quickly.

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score

scoreabhor, adore, afore, anymore, ashore, awe, bandore, Bangalore, before, boar, Boer, bore, caw, chore, claw, cocksure, comprador, cor, core, corps, craw, Delors, deplore, door, draw, drawer, evermore, explore, flaw, floor, for, forbore, fore, foresaw, forevermore, forswore, four, fourscore, furthermore, Gábor, galore, gnaw, gore, grantor, guarantor, guffaw, hard-core, Haugh, haw, hoar, ignore, implore, Indore, interwar, jaw, Johor, Lahore, law, lessor, lor, lore, macaw, man-o'-war, maw, mirador, mor, more, mortgagor, Mysore, nevermore, nor, oar, obligor, offshore, onshore, or, ore, outdoor, outwore, paw, poor, pore, pour, rapport, raw, roar, saw, scaur, score, senhor, señor, shaw, ship-to-shore, shop-floor, shore, signor, Singapore, snore, soar, softcore, sore, spore, squaw, store, straw, swore, Tagore, tau, taw, thaw, Thor, threescore, tor, tore, torr, trapdoor, tug-of-war, two-by-four, underfloor, underscore, war, warrantor, Waugh, whore, withdraw, wore, yaw, yore, your

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