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scoop

scoop / skoōp/ • n. 1. a utensil resembling a spoon, with a long handle and a deep bowl, used for removing powdered, granulated, or semisolid substances (such as ice cream) from a container. ∎  a short-handled deep shovel used for moving grain, coal, etc. ∎  a moving bowl-shaped part of a digging machine, dredger, or other mechanism into which material is gathered. ∎  a quantity taken up by a scoop: an apple pie with scoops of ice cream on top. 2. inf. a piece of news published by a newspaper or broadcast by a television or radio station in advance of its rivals. ∎  (the scoop) the latest information about something. • v. [tr.] 1. pick up and move (something) with a scoop: Philip began to scoop grain into his bag. ∎  create (a hollow or hole) with or as if with a scoop: a hole was scooped out in the floor of the hut. ∎  pick up (someone or something) in a swift, fluid movement: he scooped her up in his arms. 2. inf. publish a news story before (a rival reporter, newspaper, or radio or television station). DERIVATIVES: scoop·er n. scoop·ful n.

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scoop

scoop utensil for baling or ladling XIV; kind of shovel XV. — MLG., MDu. schōpe (Du. schoep) vessel for baling, bucket of a water-wheel = MHG. schuofe (G. †schufe) :- WGmc. *skōpō(n), f. *skōp- var. of *skap-, whence *skappjan draw water (repr. by OS. skeppian, Du. scheppen, OHG. scephan, G. schöpfen); cf. SHAPE.
Hence scoop vb. †ladle or bale out XIV; remove (as) with a scoop XVII. Also in mod. use, orig. U.S., to take up in large quantities; cut out (a rival newspaper editor, etc.) XIX (whence sb. exclusive piece of news).

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Scoop

Scoop

an amount of some items obtained in a large quantity, as with a scoop; a piece of luck; an exclusive newspaper story.

Example : scoop of penance, 1440.

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scoop

scoopbloop, cock-a-hoop, coop, croup, droop, drupe, dupe, goop, group, Guadeloupe, hoop, loop, poop, recoup, roup, scoop, sloop, snoop, soup, stoep, stoop, stoup, stupe, swoop, troop, troupe, whoop •hula-hoop • cantaloupe • nincompoop •playgroup • subgroup • peer group

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