Skip to main content
Select Source:

caliper

cal·i·per / ˈkaləpər/ (also cal·li·per) • n. 1. (calipers) an instrument for measuring external or internal dimensions, having two hinged legs resembling a pair of compasses and in-turned or out-turned points. ∎  (also caliper rule) an instrument performing a similar function but having one linear component sliding along another, with two parallel jaws and a vernier scale. ∎  (also brake caliper) a motor-vehicle or bicycle brake consisting of two or more hinged components. 2. (also caliper splint) a metal support for a person's leg.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"caliper." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"caliper." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 15, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/caliper-0

"caliper." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 15, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/caliper-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

caliper

caliperAgrippa, chipper, clipper, dipper, equipper, flipper, gripper, hipper, kipper, nipper, Pippa, ripper, shipper, sipper, skipper, slipper, stripper, tipper, tripper, whipper, zipper •crimper, shrimper, simper, whimper, Whymper •crisper, whisper •mudskipper • caliper • Philippa •juniper • gossiper •worshipper (US worshiper) •griper, piper, sniper, swiper, viper, wiper •bagpiper • sandpiper •bopper, chopper, copper, cropper, Dopper, dropper, hopper, improper, Joppa, poppa, popper, proper, shopper, stopper, swapper, topper, whopper •stomper • prosper • bebopper •teenybopper • grasshopper •clodhopper • sharecropper •name-dropper • eavesdropper •window-shopper • doorstopper •show-stopper •gawper, pauper, torpor, warper

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"caliper." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"caliper." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 15, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/caliper

"caliper." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 15, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/caliper

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Caliper

Caliper

A caliper is an instrument used for measuring linear dimensions that are not easily measured by devices such as meter sticks or rulers. Two examples of such measurements include the outer dimensions of a pipe or the internal diameter of a glass tube.

Although many kinds of calipers exist, they are all designed on a common principle: two legs are hinged at one end to allow movement of the free ends of the legs both towards and away from each other. A caliper looks like a common pair of tweezers. The distance between the free ends of the two legs is the linear dimension measured by the caliper.

The crescent-shaped legs of an outside caliper are curved inward toward each other. When the ends of the caliper are placed on the outside of some object, the distance between the ends of the legs can be read on a scale (usually incised on the pivot end of the caliper), giving the outside diameter of the object. The legs of an inside caliper, on the other hand, are curved away from each other, like an hourglass. To find an interior diameter, the caliper is placed inside an object and opened. Again, the distance between the ends of the caliper can be read on a scale.

The micrometer is one of the most common devices using the caliper principle. The micrometer consists of a metal handle around which a movable cylinder called the thimble is attached. As the thimble is rotated, a spindle connected to the handle moves toward or away from a fixed anvil. The dimensions of an object can be measured by placing the object between the anvil and the spindle and slowly rotating the thimble. When the object is in firm contact with the anvil on one side and the spindle on the other, its linear dimensions can be read on the scale located on the micrometer handle.

The micrometer caliper can provide precise measurements relatively easily. A turn of the thimble advances the spindle only a small distance. A single rotation of the thimble in most micrometers advances the spindle a distance of 0.025 in (0.064 cm). The thimble itself is divided into 25 segments, which enables the micrometer to measure distances as small as 0.001 in (0.0025 cm). The addition of a vernier scale to the micrometer can further improve the precision of a measurement by a factor of 10.

Other types of calipers include: oddleg calipers (which are also called oddleg jennys or hermaphrodite calipers); divider calipers (which are used in the metal-working industry); vernier calipers (which uses a vernier scale, a combination scale involving a secondary scale that more precisely determines measurements from a primary scale); and dial calipers (which is a type of vernier caliper but with a gear rack to move a pointer connected to a dial).

Calipers have become more advanced as analog dials have increasingly been replaced with electronic digital displays. These types of calipers offer the ability to switch between different measuring units, such as between metric and English. Computers are also often used with digital calipers, increasing their versatility and popularity even more.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Caliper." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Caliper." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 15, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/caliper

"Caliper." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved August 15, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/caliper

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Caliper

Caliper

A caliper is an instrument used for measuring linear dimensions that are not easily measured by devices such as meter sticks or rulers. Two examples of such measurements include the outer dimensions of a pipe or the internal diameter of a glass tube.

Although many kinds of calipers exist, they are all designed on a common principle: two legs are hinged at one end to allow movement of the free ends of the legs both towards and away from each other. A caliper looks like a common pair of tweezers. The distance between the free ends of the two legs is the linear dimension measured by the caliper.

The crescent-shaped legs of an outside caliper are curved inward toward each other. When the ends of the caliper are placed on the outside of some object, the distance between the ends of the legs can be read on a scale (usually incised on the pivot end of the caliper), giving the outside diameter of the object. The legs of an inside caliper, on the other hand, are curved away from each other, like an hourglass. To find an interior diameter, the caliper is placed inside an object and opened. Again, the distance between the ends of the caliper can be read on a scale.

The micrometer is one of the most common devices using the caliper principle. The micrometer consists of a metal handle around which a movable cylinder called the thimble is attached. As the thimble is rotated, a spindle connected to the handle moves toward or away from a fixed anvil. The dimensions of an object can be measured by placing the object between the anvil and the spindle and slowly rotating the thimble. When the object is in firm contact with the anvil on one side and the spindle on the other, its linear dimensions can be read on the scale located on the micrometer handle.

The micrometer caliper can provide precise measurements relatively easily. A turn of the thimble advances the spindle only a small distance. A single rotation of the thimble in most micrometers advances the spindle a distance of 0.025 in (0.064 cm). The thimble itself is divided into 25 segments, which enables the micrometer to measure distances as small as 0.001 in (0.0025 cm). The addition of a vernier scale to the micrometer can further improve the precision of a measurement by a factor of 10.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Caliper." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Caliper." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 15, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/caliper-0

"Caliper." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved August 15, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/caliper-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.