goblin

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goblin a mischievous, ugly, dwarf-like creature of folklore. The word is Middle English and from Old French gobelin, possibly related to German (see kobold) or Greek kobalos ‘mischievous goblin’. In medieval Latin Gobelinus occurs as the name of a mischievous spirit, said to haunt Évreux in northern France in the 12th century.

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Goblin woof! 1993

Newlywed couple regret the purchase of their new home when the devilish creature once brought to life by the previous homeowner, a witchcraft performing farmer, is raised from the depths of hell to rip to pieces anyone in its view. Any movie whose promo says “You won't believe your eyes… until he rips them from their sockets” is sure to be a crowd pleaser. Enjoy. 75m/C VHS . Bobby Westrick, Jenny Admire; D: Todd Sheets.

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goblin XIV. prob. — AN. *gobelin (recorded in F. XV and surviving in Norman dial.), medL. gobelīnus; prob. appellative use of a proper name, dim. of Gobel (now Gobeau), app. rel. to kobold (see COBALT).

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gob·lin / ˈgäblin/ • n. a mischievous, ugly, dwarflike creature of folklore.

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Goblin

A spirit formerly supposed to lurk in houses. Goblins were generally of a mischievous and grotesque nature. Hobgoblins, according to Junius, were so called because they used to hop on one leg.

(See also fairies )