Skip to main content

Administrative Conference of the United States

ADMINISTRATIVE CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED STATES

Created in 1968, the Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS) was a federal independent agency and advisory committee chartered for the purpose of ensuring the fair and efficient administration of various federal agencies. The ACUS studied administrative processes and recommended improvements in the procedures by which federal agencies administered regulatory, benefit, and other government programs. It had no power to enact its recommendations into law, or to enforce them once they were enacted, but it did carry great weight in the formulation of procedures and policies of federal administrative agencies.

The ACUS consisted of heads of administrative agencies, private lawyers, university professors, various federal officials, and other experts in administrative law and government. These experts collectively conducted continuing studies of selected problems that existed in the procedures of federal administrative agencies. The specific charge of ACUS was to harness the experience and judgment of the administrative agency specialists to improve the fairness and effectiveness of administrative procedures and functions.

From 1968 to 1995, the ACUS issued approximately two hundred recommendations, the majority of which were at least partially implemented. In 1995, Congress terminated funding for the ACUS, and it ceased operation.

further readings

"Administrative Conference of the United States" (Symposium). 1998. Arizona State Law Journal 30 (spring).

Funk, William. "R.I.P. A.C.U.S." ABA Network: Administrative & Regulatory Law News. Available online at <www.abanet.org/adminlaw/news/vol21no2/acus_rip.html> (accessed June 12, 2003).

"Recommendations of the Administrative Conference of the United States." ABA Administrative Procedure Database. Available online at <www.law.fsu.edu/library/admin/acus/acustoc.html> (accessed June 12, 2003).

cross-references

Administrative Agency; Administrative Law and Procedure.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Administrative Conference of the United States." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Administrative Conference of the United States." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 19, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/administrative-conference-united-states

"Administrative Conference of the United States." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved November 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/administrative-conference-united-states

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.