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further

fur·ther / ˈfər[voicedth]ər/ • used as comparative of far. • adv. 1. (also far·ther / ˈfär[voicedth]ər/ ) at, to, or by a greater distance (used to indicate the extent to which one thing or person is or becomes distant from another): for some time I had wanted to move farther from Lynne | fig. the committee seems to have moved further away from its original aims. ∎  used to emphasize the difference between a supposed or suggested fact or state of mind and the truth: as for her being a liar, nothing could be further from the truth nothing could be further from his mind than marrying. 2. (also far·ther / ˈfär-/ ) over a greater expanse of space or time; for a longer way: we had walked further than I realized | fig. wages have been driven down even further. ∎  beyond the point already reached or the distance already covered: Emily decided to drive further up the coast | before going any further we need to define our terms. 3. beyond or in addition to what has already been done: we are investigating ways to further increase customer satisfaction this theme will be developed further in Chapter 6 I shall not trouble you any further. ∎  used to introduce a new point relating to or reinforcing a previous statement: Ethnic minorities are more prone to unemployment. Further, this disadvantage extends to other areas of life. ∎  at or to a more advanced, successful, or desirable stage: at the end of three years they were no further on. • adj. 1. (also far·ther / ˈfär-/ ) more distant in space than something else of the same kind: two men were standing at the further end of the clearing. ∎  more remote from a central point: the museum is in the further reaches of the town. 2. additional to what already exists or has already taken place, been done, or been accounted for: cook for a further ten minutes. • v. [tr.] help the progress or development of (something); promote: he had depended on using them to further his own career. PHRASES: not go any further (of a secret) not be told to anyone else. until further notice used to indicate that a situation will not change until another announcement is made: the museum is closed to the public until further notice. until further orders used to indicate that a situation is only to change when another command is received: they were to be kept in prison until further orders.DERIVATIVES: fur·ther·er n.

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