Skip to main content

Senter, Isaac

Senter, Isaac

SENTER, ISAAC. (1755–1799). Army physician, diarist. New Hampshire and Rhode Island. Born in New Hampshire, Isaac Senter went to Newport, Rhode Island, early in life and studied medicine under Dr. Thomas Moffat. At the age of twenty he joined the Boston army as a surgeon and volunteered for Benedict Arnold's march to Quebec.

In November 1775 Senter became surgeon of the Third Rhode Island Regiment, a position he held until March 1776. Subsequently he was hospital surgeon from 20 July 1776 to April 1779, and surgeon-general of the Rhode Island Militia from 1779 to 1781. He established a private practice in Pawtucket, but later moved to Newport, Rhode Island, becoming an eminent surgeon there. An honorary member of the medical societies of London, Edinburgh, and Massachusetts, he was president of the Rhode Island Society of the Cincinnati for many years. He died in Newport on 20 December 1799.

SEE ALSO Medical Practice during the Revolution.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Senter, Isaac. "The Journal of Isaac Senter, M.D., on a Secret Expedition against Quebec, 1775." The Magazine of History 42 (1915).

                                 revised by Michael Bellesiles

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Senter, Isaac." Encyclopedia of the American Revolution: Library of Military History. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Senter, Isaac." Encyclopedia of the American Revolution: Library of Military History. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/senter-isaac

"Senter, Isaac." Encyclopedia of the American Revolution: Library of Military History. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/senter-isaac

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.