legion

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le·gion / ˈlējən/ • n. 1. a unit of 3,000–6,000 men in the ancient Roman army. ∎  (the Legion) the Foreign Legion. ∎  (the Legion) any of the national associations of former servicemen and servicewomen instituted after World War I, such as the American Legion. 2. (a legion/legions of) a vast host, multitude, or number of people or things: legions of photographers and TV cameras. • adj. great in number: her fans are legion.

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Legion

LEGION. In the eighteenth century (and later), a "legion" was a unit composed of infantry and mounted troops. Two were Henry Lee's Legion and Tarleton's British Legion. Other legions of the American army were led by Pulaski and Tuffin in succession and by William Washington. Benedict Arnold's Tory organization was called the American Legion, and this name was applied also to the legions of Tuffin, Pulaski, and Henry Lee.

SEE ALSO British Legion; Lee's Legion; Pulaski, Casimir; Tuffin, Armand-Charles, Marquis de La Rouerie.

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Legion ★★ 1998 (R)

Major Agatha Doyle (Farrell) is given a group of convicts to lead on a mission to destroy The Legion, a genetically engineered killing machine. But first she has to keep them from killing each other—or her. 97m/C VHS, DVD . Terry Farrell, Corey Feldman, Rick Springfield, Parker Stevenson, Audie England; D: Jon Hess. CABLE

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legion Basic organizational unit of the Roman army from the early Republic to the fall of the Empire in the West in the 5th century ad. During the great period of Rome's expansion, a legion was about 6000 men strong, consisting mainly of heavy infantrymen (legionaries), with some light troops and cavalry in support. The legion was subdivided into cohorts (420 men each), maniples (120 men each), and centuries (100 men each).

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legion a division of 3,000–6,000 men, including a complement of cavalry, in the ancient Roman army.

Legion is also used to mean great in number, many, as in their name is legion. This usage dates from the late 17th century, from the story in Mark 5:9 of the madman healed by Jesus, who when asked his name had replied, ‘My name is Legion, for we are many.’

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Legion

a multitude; a great number; a unit of Roman troops; a host of armed men.

Examples: legion of angels, 1380; of appetites and passions, 1751; of devils; of horrid hell, 1605; of knights, 1400; of reproaches, 1634; of Rome, 1387; of troops; of whelps, 1824.

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legion body of infantry in the ancient Roman army; vast host. XIII. — OF. legiun, -ion (mod. légion) — L. legiō, -ōn, f. legere choose, levy (see LECTION).