Globigerina ooze

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Globigerina ooze Deep-sea ooze in which at least 30% of the sediment consists of planktonic foraminifera (Foraminiferida) including chiefly Globigerina. It is the most widespread pelagic deposit, covering almost 50% of the deep-sea floor, and it covers most of the floor of the western Indian ocean, the mid-Atlantic Ocean, and the equatorial and S. Pacific. Species occurring in this deposit have been used to establish climatological and temperature criteria. Globorotalia menardii is supposed to indicate warmer conditions and Globigerina pachyderma to indicate colder temperatures. Another foraminiferan, Globorotalia truncatulinoides can coil in either a left- or right-handed manner and it is suggested that right coiling indicates warmer conditions and left coiling colder.

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Globigerina ooze Deep-sea ooze in which at least 30 per cent of the sediment consists of planktonic members of the order Foraminiferida, including chiefly Globigerina. It is the most widespread deposit to form from the settling out of material from overlying waters, covering almost 50 per cent of the deep-sea floor. Globigerina ooze covers most of the floor of the western Indian Ocean, the mid-Atlantic Ocean, and the equatorial and South Pacific. Species occurring in this deposit have been used to establish climatological and temperature criteria. Globorotalia menardii is supposed to indicate warmer conditions and Globigerina pachyderma to indicate colder temperatures. Another foraminiferan, Globorotalia truncatulinoides can coil in either a left- or right-handed manner and it is suggested that right coiling indicates warmer conditions and left coiling colder ones.

views updated

Globigerina ooze Deep-sea ooze in which at least 30% of the sediment consists of planktonic Foraminiferida, including chiefly Globigerina. It is the most widespread deposit to form from the settling out of material from overlying waters, covering almost 50% of the deep-sea floor. Globigerina ooze covers most of the floor of the western Indian ocean, the mid-Atlantic Ocean, and the Equatorial and S. Pacific.