Hautman, Pete 1952-

views updated

Hautman, Pete 1952-
(Peter Murray)


Personal


Born September 29, 1952, in Berkeley, CA; son of Thomas Richard and Margaret Elaine (an artist; maiden

name, Murray) Hautman; married Mary Louise Logue (a writer). Education: Attended Minneapolis College of Art and Design, 1970–72, and University of Minnesota, 1972–76.

Addresses


Home—Golden Valley, MN; and Stockholm, WI. Agent—Jonathon Lazear, Lazear Literary Agency, 800 Washington Ave. N., No. 660, Minneapolis, MN 55401. E-mail—[email protected]

Career


Writer. Worked in freelance marketing and design, and as a sign painter, graphic artist, and pineapple slicer.

Member


Mystery Writers of America.

Awards, Honors


New York Times Notable Book designation, 1993, for Drawing Dead, and 1996, for The Mortal Nuts; Edgar Allan Poe Award nomination, Mystery Writers of America, and Notable Book designation, American Library Association (ALA), both for Mr. Was; Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers, ALA, for Stone Cold; Minnesota Book Award for Best Popular Novel, 1999, for Mrs. Million; National Book Award for Young People's Literature, 2004, for Godless.

Writings


YOUNG-ADULT FICTION


Mr. Was, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1996.

Stone Cold, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1998, published as No Limit, Simon Pulse (New York, NY), 2005.

Hole in the Sky, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2001.

Sweetblood, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2003.

Godless, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2004.

Invisible, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2005.

Rash, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2006.

(With wife, Mary Logue) Snatched (book one of "Bloodwater Mysteries" series), Putnam (New York, NY), 2006.

(With Mary Logue) Skullduggery (book two of "Bloodwater Mysteries" series), Putnam (New York, NY), 2007.

FOR CHILDREN; NONFICTION; UNDER NAME PETER MURRAY


Beavers, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

Black Widows, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

Dogs, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

Planet Earth, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

The Planets, illustrated by Anastasia Mitchell, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

Rhinos, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

Silly Science Tricks, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992, published as Silly Science Tricks: With Professor Solomon Snickerdoodle, illustrated by Anastasia Mitchell, 1993.

Snakes, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

Spiders, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

The World's Greatest Chocolate Chip Cookies, illustrated by Anastasia Mitchell, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

The World's Greatest Paper Airplanes, illustrated by Anastasia Mitchell, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

You Can Juggle, illustrated by Anastasia Mitchell, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

Your Bones: An Inside Look at Skeletons, illustrated by Viki Woodworth, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1992.

The Amazon, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Beetles, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Chameleons, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

The Everglades, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Frogs, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Gorillas, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Hummingbirds, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Parrots, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Porcupines, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

The Sahara, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Saturn, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Sea Otters, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

The Space Shuttle, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Tarantulas, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1993.

Science Tricks with Air, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1995, published as Professor Solomon Snickerdoodle's Air Science Tricks, 1995.

Science Tricks with Light, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1995, Professor Solomon Snickerdoodle's Light Science Tricks, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1999.

Professor Solomon Snickerdoodle Looks at Water, illustrated by Anastasia Mitchell, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1995, published as Professor Solomon Snickerdoodle's Water Science Tricks, 1998.

Dirt, Wonderful Dirt!, illustrated by Penny Dann, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1995.

Make a Kite!, illustrated by Penny Dann, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1995.

The Perfect Pizza, illustrated by Penny Dann, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1995.

Sitting Bull: A Story of Bravery, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1996.

Cactus, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1996.

Orchids, Child's World (Mankato, MN), 1996.

Roses, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1996.

Earthquakes, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1996.

Mushrooms, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1996.

Hurricanes, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1996.

Tornadoes, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1996.

Volcanoes, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1996.

Deserts, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1997.

Lightning, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1997.

Mountains, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1997.

Rainforests, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1997.

Redwoods, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1997.

Prairies, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1997.

Floods, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1997.

Scorpions, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1997.

Pigs, Child's World (Chanhassen, MN), 1998.

Snails, Child's World (Chanhassen, MN), 1998.

Sheep, Child's World (Chanhassen, MN), 1998.

Curiosity: The Story of Marie Curie, illustrated by Leon Baxter, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1998.

Perseverance: The Story of Thomas Alva Edison, illustrated by Robin Lawrie, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1998.

Dreams: The Story of Martin Luther King, Jr., illustrated by Robin Lawrie, Child's World (Plymouth, MN), 1999.

A Sense of Humor: The Story of Mark Twain, Child's World (Chanhassen, MN), 1999.

Copper, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Silver, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Oil, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Diamonds, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Gold, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Iron, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Apatosaurus, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Stegosaurus, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Pterodactyls, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Tyrannosaurus Rex, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Triceratops, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

Velociraptor, Smart Apple Media (North Mankato, MN), 2001.

ADULT NOVELS


Drawing Dead, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1993.

Short Money, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1995.

The Mortal Nuts, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1996.

Ring Game, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1997.

Mrs. Million, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1999.

Rag Man, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2001.

Doohickey, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2002.

The Prop, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2006.

Work in Progress


All In, a sequel to No Limit, for Simon & Schuster; a poker-themed short-story collection called Full House.

Sidelights


Pete Hautman is a prolific author who has found publishing success in both adult novels and highly acclaimed works of fiction for teen readers. Among his titles lauded by critics for their imaginative, action-filled plots are Mr. Was, Hole in the Sky, and the award-winning Godless, all of which feature young protagonists whose confrontation with difficulties force them to follow unusual paths into adulthood. Under the pseudonym Peter Murray, Hautman has penned numerous works of juvenile nonfiction covering everything from dinosaurs to weather to biographies of notable Americans.

After working for almost twenty years in advertising and design, Hautman left that field in 1992 to begin his second career as a freelance author. "It has turned out to be a happy decision," he once told SATA. "I live in a large house in south Minneapolis with mystery writer, poet, and children's author Mary Logue, and a cat named Ubik. We spend part of each summer at our second home, an old farmhouse in Stockholm, Wisconsin. Both Mary and I write every day, and we like it. We act as each other's editor, critic, and cheerleader." In addition to his novels for teen readers, Hautman has found success as the author of adult novels that deal with gambling, crime, and mystery.

Mr. Was, published in 1996, is a serious young-adult tale in which Hautman mixes contemporary elements with time travel; the "well-drawn problem plot mix[es]

successfully with time travel" according to Booklist contributor Laura Tillotson. Taking place in the author's home state of Minnesota, the story focuses on teenager Jack Lund as he moves into his late grandfather's house. While the house seems forbidding, it contains a portal that takes Jack back to 1940, allowing him to escape his brutal father's alcoholism and the death of his mother. Further twists to the plot ensue when Jack's new job as a farmhand causes him to meet the young woman who will one day become his grandmother—as long as his presence in the past does not disrupt his own future. Other adventures take Jack from rural Minnesota to the World War II battlefield of Guadalcanal. "Ingenious plotting and startling action combine to make [Mr. Was] … a riveting read," a Publishers Weekly contributor enthused, the reviewer adding that Hautman's plot is "sophisticated" without becoming "overwhelming," and is "mined with surprises that explode like fireworks."

Gambling-addicted teen Denn Doyle is the troubled protagonist of Stone Cold. Denn brushes aside the concerns of family and friends who realize his compulsion to play poker is becoming increasingly destructive, and remains hooked on the sense of power that the game gives him. The game and the wealth it promises become the center of his life, and he loses interest in his landscaping business, his family, and even his girlfriend. Stone Cold is "enthralling reading," wrote Horn Book contributor Nancy Vasilakis, the critic adding that its "final devastating scene will … leave readers with something to think about." A Publishers Weekly critic called the book "swift and salacious," noting that the title "compellingly echoes gambling's siren call." Booklist contributor Roger Leslie found "Denn's first-person narration … brisk and engaging" and the novel intriguing in its focus on "the interesting intricacies of addiction" rather than arguing against gambling. "Hautman knows the world of cards and the world of adolescence; this is a compelling read," concluded Paula Rohrlick in Kliatt. Stone Cold has also been published as No Limit, and the story continues in the sequel, All In.

Taking place in the near future, The Hole in the Sky features four teens who are among the few survivors of an influenza outbreak that depopulates most of Earth. Sixteen-year-old Ceej Kane and his sister Harryette, one of the few survivors of the plague, live with their uncle near the Grand Canyon. When Harryette and her uncle disappear, Ceej and his friend Tim must try to find them; when the two teens are attacked by the Kinka—a cult-like group who believe they alone are the chosen people of an angered God and must therefore eliminate all other survivors—Ceej and Tim flee into the wilderness. There, they meet Bella, a mysterious Hopi girl seeking a passage from this world into the next, where all will be free of the plague. Bella agrees to help the teens find Harryette and her uncle, but when they do, it appears that Harryette has joined the Kinka and may not want to be saved. While noting that the story's mysticism—involving Native American beliefs regarding the existence of a magical path leading to a new world—"may displease those who like their speculative fiction to remain realistic," a Horn Book contributor praised Hautman's "intense action and fascinating premise." Reviewing the work for Booklist, Roger Leslie complimented the author as well, noting that, "thanks to Hautman's skillful storytelling," the teens' trip remains compelling; the novelist "promises much and delivers impressively," Leslie added. "Hautman writes lyrically about the Grand Canyon, and the tense plot will keep readers turning the pages," wrote Paula Rohrlick in Kliatt.

Sweetblood introduces readers to a diabetic teenager named Lucy who writes a school report linking vampire legends to her chronic disease. Lucy, who is depressed and lonely, eventually comes into contact with a group of Goth students, including one who thinks he is a vampire. As Lucy sinks further into despair, she begins looking for a new way to view life. Debbie Carton, writing in Booklist, noted that "Lucy's clever, self-deprecating voice is endlessly original," while a Kirkus Reviews contributor called the story "an original and powerful tale."

The award-winning teen novel Godless focuses on Jason Bock, a bright teenager who, along with his equally bright friend Shin, creates graphic novels. The pair's creative bent, however, takes another turn after they create a new religion, intending it as a spoof of Catholicism. Their new faith, based on the spirituality of water, soon begins to take on a life of its own as other teens become believers, following Jason to "worship" at the local watertower. A terrible accident and the realization that Shin has actual begun to believe what the two of them invented finally force Jason to look at the consequences of his actions.

The topic of religion, both invented and practiced, looms large over the course of Godless. "Inventive, frequently funny and sometimes scary, this YA novel has a lot to offer readers," wrote Claire Rosser in Kliatt, and a Kirkus Reviews contributor called Godless "thoughtprovoking and unique."The tone of the novel changes from fairly light-hearted to deep and complex; according to Joel Shoemaker of School Library Journal, "While chuckling aloud may be common in the early chapters, serious issues dominate the latter stages of the book." According to Hautman, the book is not about God; "It's about how people—teenagers in particular—deal with the questions that arise when their faith has been shaken," the author explained on his home page.

Invisible looks at another smart kid, a teen named Doug, who claims to be "invisible"because of the way he is treated by a teacher and ignored by a girl he has a crush on. The only positive relationship he has is the one he shares with his best friend, Andy, a popular athlete. As the story unfolds, readers perceive that Doug is acting like a stalker and has numerous emotional problems. His relationship with Andy is also more complex than it first appeared, its layers revealed as readers discover the events shaping Doug's life. A Kirkus Reviews contributor called Invisible a "haunting, lonely tale," while a Publishers Weekly contributor noted that "the strength of Hautman's painfully said novel is the wisecracking but clearly unreliable voice of its narrator." Susan Riley, writing in School Library Journal, commented that, "with its excellent plot development and unforgettable, heartbreaking protagonist, this is a compelling novel of mental illness." According to Ilene Cooper in Booklist, "the chilling but ambiguous denouement" Hautman includes in Invisible "is definitely unsettling."

Rash was described by Horn Book reviewer Vicky Smith as a combination of M.T. Anderson's Feed and Louis Sachar's Holes. In the futuristic United Safer States of America, doing anything dangerous is against

the law and people have to wear helmets even while walking along a sidewalk. When hot-tempered Bo Marsten gets into a fight that results in his arrest, he winds up in a rehabilitation factory where he is forced to join an illegal football team. "This thought-provoking and highly entertaining dystopian fantasy is certain to spark discussion among teens," wrote a Publishers Weekly contributor. A Kirkus Reviews critic wrote of the title that, "bitingly funny and unexpectedly heartwarming, Bo's coming-of-age is a winner."

In addition to their separate books, Hautman and wife Mary Logue have also begun the "Bloodwater Mysteries" novel series as a joint project. Geared toward younger readers than Hautman's YA novels, series installment Snatched introduces readers to Roni Delicata and Brian Bain, two teen detectives determined to solve the mystey of their classmate's disappearance. As B. Allison Gray wrote in her School Library Journal review, the coauthors "are able to manage the rapid unfolding of the plot while still allowing for character development," while Christine M. Heppermann called Roni and Brian a "younger, hipper Holmes and Watson" in her Horn Book review.

Biographical and Critical Sources


PERIODICALS


Booklist, March 15, 1993, p. 135; October 1, 1993, Donna Seaman, review of Drawing Dead, p. 253; April 1, 1996, Thomas Gaughan, review of The Mortal Nuts, p. 1346; September 15, 1996, Laura Tillotson, review of Mr. Was, p. 230; October 1, 1997, David Pitt, review of Ring Game, p. 310; September 15, 1998, Roger Leslie, review of Stone Cold, p. 218; April 15, 2001, Roger Leslie, review of Hole in the Sky, p. 1554; September 1, 2001, Joanne Wilkinson, review of Rag Man, p. 56; September 1, 2002, Joanne Wilkinson, review of Doohickey, p. 62; May 1, 2003, Debbie Carton, review of Sweetblood, p. 1595; June 1, 2004, Ilene Cooper, review of Godless, p. 1730; January 1, 2005, review of Godless, p. 772; June 1, 2005, Ilene Cooper, review of Invisible, p. 1784; March 1, 2006, Frank Sennett, review of The Prop, p. 71.

Entertainment Weekly, July 26, 1996, Gene Lyons, review of The Mortal Nuts, p. 51.

Horn Book, November, 1998, Nancy Vasilakis, review of Stone Cold, p. 730; May, 2001, review of Hole in the Sky, p. 325; July–August, 2003, Lauren Adams, review of Sweetblood, p. 458; July–August, 2004, Deirdre F. Baker, review of Godless, p. 453; May–June, 2005, Betty Carter, review of Invisible, p. 325; May–June, 2006, Vicky Smith, review of Rash, p. 319; July–August, 2006, Christine M. Heppermann, review of Snatched, p. 442.

Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, February, 2005, James Blasingame, interview with Hautman, p. 438.

Kirkus Reviews, August 15, 1993, p. 1018; August 15, 2001, review of Rag Man, p. 1149; August 15, 2002, review of Doohickey, p. 1163; June 1, 2003, review of Sweetblood, p. 805; May 1, 2004, review of Godless, p. 442; May 15, 2005, review of Invisible, p. 590; January 15, 2006, review of The Prop, p. 55; April 15, 2006, review of Snatched, p. 407; June 1, 2006, review of Rash, p. 573.

Kliatt, May, 2003, Claire Rosser, review of Sweetblood, p. 10; May, 2004, Claire Rosser, review of Godless, p. 8; September, 2004, Claire Rosser, review of Sweetblood, p. 20; July, 2005, Paula Rohrlick, review of No Limit, pp. 21; November, 2005, Claire Rosser, review of Godless, p. 14, and Paula Rohrlick, review of Hole in the Sky, p. 20.

Library Journal, October 1, 1993, Erna Chamberlain, review of Drawing Dead, p. 126; January, 1996, Paul Kaplan, review of Short Money, p. 176; May 1, 1996, Rex E. Klett, review of The Mortal Nuts, p. 136; October 1, 1997, Jo Ann Vicarel, review of Ring Game, p. 122; April 1, 1999, Thomas L. Kilpatrick, review of Mrs. Million, p. 128.

New York Times Book Review, November 7, 1993, Marilyn Stasio, review of Drawing Dead, p. 24; May 21, 1995, Marilyn Stasio, review of Short Money, p. 39; June 23, 1996, Marilyn Stasio, review of The Mortal Nuts, p. 28; November 9, 1997, Marilyn Stasio, review of Ring Game, p. 29; April 9, 2000, John D. Thomas, review of Mrs. Million, p. 223; October 14, 2001, Marilyn Stasio, review of Rag Man, p. 26.

People, August 5, 1996, J.D. Reed, review of The Mortal Nuts, p. 32.

Publishers Weekly, August 30, 1993, review of Drawing Dead, p. 74; March 27, 1995, review of Short Money, p. 78; October 28, 1996, review of Mr. Was, p. 83; September 1, 1997, review of Ring Game, p. 94; October 12, 1998, review of Stone Cold, p. 78; February 8, 1999, review of Mrs. Million, p. 196; May 14, 2001, review of Hole in the Sky, p. 83; August 13, 2001, review of Rag Man, p. 281; August 12, 2002, review of Doohickey, p. 274; June 2, 2003, review of Sweetblood, p. 53; June 28, 2004, review of Godless, p. 51; June 27, 2005, review of Invisible, p. 65; January 16, 2006, review of The Prop, p. 35; May 8, 2006, review of Rash, p. 66, Sue Corbett, interview with Hautman, p. 67.

School Library Journal, July, 1993, p. 77; October, 1996, John Peters, review of Mr. Was, p. 147; September, 1998, Joel Shoemaker, review of Stone Cold, p. 203; June, 2001, Steven Engelfried, review of Hole in the Sky, p. 149; July, 2003, Lynn Evarts, review of Sweetblood, p. 130; August, 2004, Joel Shoemaker, review of Godless, p. 123; June, 2005, Susan Riley, review of Invisible, p. 160; June, 2006, B. Allison Gray, review of Snatched, p. 158.

Voice of Youth Advocates, October, 2004, Jamie S. Hansen, review of Godless, p. 298.

ONLINE


AllReaders.com,http://www.allreaders.com/ (September 27, 2006), Harriet Klausner, reviews of Rag Man and Doohickey.

BookPage,http://www.bookpage.com/ (June 1, 2005), Linda M. Castellito, interview with Hautman.

Pete Hautman Home Page,http://www.petehautman.com (February 24, 2006).