Skip to main content

VanDevelder, Paul 1951(?)-

VANDEVELDER, Paul 1951(?)-

PERSONAL: Born c. 1951. Education: Attended University of Montana.

ADDRESSES: Agent—c/o Author Mail, Little, Brown & Co., 1271 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020.

CAREER: Journalist, film maker, and author of nonfiction.

AWARDS, HONORS: National Endowment of the Arts award for short fiction, "Chrysallis," c. 1976; Best film, American Indian Film Festival, 1998, for Journey to Medicine; Best Feature Story by Non-Native, Native American Journalists Association, 2002.

WRITINGS:

Coyote Warrior: One Man, Three Tribes, and the Trial That Forged a Nation, Little, Brown (New York, NY), 2004.

Also wrote film screenplay Journey to Medicine, 1996. Contributor to periodicals and journals, including National Geographic Traveler, Paris Match, Esquire, Forbes, Better Homes and Gardens, Sunset, Stern, Native Americas, Audubon, Native Peoples, San Francisco Chronicle, Sierra, Smithsonian, News Watch, Seattle Times, and is a syndicated columnist through the High Country News service.

SIDELIGHTS: For Paul VanDevelder, success as a writer came too early. After winning a National Endowment Arts award for short fiction, VanDevelder was inundated by offers from agents seeking to represent him. However, for fifteen years he wrestled with the conviction that "either I had nothing to say, or I didn't know how to say it," as he put it on the Time-Warner Books Web site. Finally, he entered journalism school and graduated with a determination to tell stories, not with words but with the camera. Only after twelve years as a photographer covering conflicts, natural disasters, and tragedies all over the world—and writing thousands of pithy, clever cutlines—did he believe he had the stories and the skills to truly become a writer.

In 1993, when Sierra magazine asked VanDevelder to cover emerging conflicts between Native American tribes, state governments, and extraction industries, his investigation commenced an adventure that spanned ten years and resulted in Coyote Warrior: One Man, Three Tribes, and the Trial That Forged a Nation, which "holds a mirror up to postcolonial America itself," in the words of Audubon reviewer Robert Braile. Much of the book is a salute to so-called "Coyote Warriors": well-educated Native Americans who use law and science to defend tribal rights and reclaim privileges guaranteed by treaty. At the same time, he provides a sweeping chronicle of the interplay between the U.S. government and Native Americans over the past two hundred years, beginning with the decisions of U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall that gave Indians their independent but protected status. He also tells the fascinating story of the Cross family, descendants of a Mandan chief who welcomed explorers Lewis and Clark, and their struggle to defend tribal lands threatened by a huge dam project, or at least get proper compensation. The result, in the words of a Kirkus Reviews contributor, is a "solid case study in emerging trend: American Indian lawyers' use of the courts to extract rights and dollars hidden away in long-forgotten treaties."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

periodicals

Albuquerque Journal, December 3, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior: One Man, Three Tribes, and the Trial That Forged a Nation, p. F1.

Audubon, November-December, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. 94.

Booklist, August, 2004, Deborah Donovan, review of Coyote Warrior, p. 1883.

Esquire, October, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior.

Eugene Register Guard, December 3, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. G6.

Kirkus Reviews, June 1, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. 531.

Library Journal, June 15, 2004, Margaret Atwater-Singer, review of Coyote Warrior, p. 84.

Milwaukee Journal, August 21, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior.

Missoulian, September 30, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. 1.

Montana Lawyer, October, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior.

Native Peoples, September 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. 86.

Oregonian, November 24, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. E8.

Outside, August, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. 37.

Publishers Weekly, May 17, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. 40.

San Diego Tribune, September 5, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior.

San Francisco Chronicle, August 29, 2004, review of Coyote Warrior, p. M5.

online

Time Warner Web site, http://www.twbookmark.com/ (November 22, 2004), interview with VanDevelder.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"VanDevelder, Paul 1951(?)-." Contemporary Authors. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"VanDevelder, Paul 1951(?)-." Contemporary Authors. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 21, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/vandevelder-paul-1951

"VanDevelder, Paul 1951(?)-." Contemporary Authors. . Retrieved November 21, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/vandevelder-paul-1951

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.