Stalker, Peter 1944-

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STALKER, Peter 1944-


PERSONAL: Born October 7, 1944, in Belfast, Northern Ireland; son of Bernard and Eileen Stalker. Education: Degree in science. Politics: Labour Party.

ADDRESSES: Home—Oxford, England. Offıce—51 Cranham St., Oxford 0X2 6DD, England. E-mail— [email protected]


CAREER: Freelance author and editor. United Nations Development Programme, editor of Human Development Report, 1991-97. Writer and editor of publications for U.N. agencies in countries, including Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Mongolia, Nepal, Thailand, and Timor Leste. Trustee for New Internationalist and Employment for the Disabled; Strategies for Hope, director.


AWARDS, HONORS: Certificate of Honour for Exceptional Services to City of Oxford, England.


WRITINGS:


The Work of Strangers: A Survey of International Migration, International Labour Office (Geneva, Switzerland), 1994.

A Fork in the Path: Human Development Choices for Bangladesh, Pioneer Print Press (Dhaka, Bangladesh), 1994.

(Editor) Bangladesh Human Development Report: Monitoring Development, United Nations Development Programme (Dhaka, Bangladesh), 1994.

The Dancing Horizon: Human Development Prospects, Bangladesh, Pioneer Print Press (Dhaka, Bangladesh), 1997.

Bangladesh: Visions and Hopes, UNICEF Bangladesh (Dhaka, Bangladesh), 1998.

Workers without Frontiers: The Impact of International Migration, Lynne Rienner (Boulder, CO), 2000.

Oxford Handbook of the World, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 2000.

(Editor, with Cynthia Hewitt and Jenifer Freedman) Visible Hands: Taking Responsibility for Social Development, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (Geneva, Switzerland), 2000.

(Editor) No-Nonsense Guide to International Migration, New International/Verso, 2001.

Every Last Child: Fulfilling the Rights of Women and Children in East Asia and the Pacific, UNICEF, 2001.

Beyond Krismon: The Social Legacy of Indonesia's Financial Crisis, UNICEF, 2001.

The Right to Development in Indonesia, Unsfir (Jakarta, Indonesia), 2002.

End Child Exploitation, UNICEF (London, England), 2002.

A Future for All Our Children, UNICEF (Bangkok, Thailand), 2003.

Editor of Jericho Echo (community newspaper).


SIDELIGHTS: A long-time affiliate for various agencies of the United Nations, Peter Stalker is a specialist in economic and social issues. He has worked as editor of the Human Development Report for the U.N. Development program, and has traveled to a number of countries on writing assignments for U.N. agencies. While working for the International Labour Organization in Geneva, he developed a particular interest in international migration and was subsequently commissioned by the organization to write two books on the subject.


The Work of Strangers: A Survey of International Labour Migration examines the reasons behind labor migration from country to country. The work includes extensive data to support Stalker's theses, as well as a detailed bibliography. The book is divided into two parts: the first part provides a history and general information on labor migration issues, while the second is devoted to specific migration studies of twenty countries. In a review of The Work of Strangers in International Migration Review, Philip Martin praised Stalker for authoring a "useful book" and one that is "especially valuable for pulling together conclu sions" on a wide variety of issues.

In Workers without Frontiers: The Impact of Globalization on International Migration Stalker studies the effects of the globalization of the world economy on labor migration patterns and issues. He proposes that although labor migration is a little-studied arena of international economics studies, it is actually a vital part of the global marketplace. According to a critic for the International Labour Review, Stalker's book "offers a unique assessment of a complex and contentious issue." And Jonathan Perraton noted in the Journal of Development Studies that Workers without Frontiers "places migration firmly in the context of other aspects of global economic integration" and that it will "stimulate much-needed further research in this field."

Stalker has also authored The No-Nonsense Guide to International Migration, a short overview of the nature, history, and mechanics of labor migration. In this work, noted Teresa Hayter in the Times Literary Supplement, Stalker presents an "informative" analysis of labor migration trends into developed countries, focusing especially on the suffering endured by many migrants who are exploited due to difficult labor laws.


BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:


periodicals


Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law, summer, 2001, review of Workers without Frontiers: The Impact of Globalization on International Migration, p. 260.

Choice, April, 1995, H. Kasper, review of The Work of Strangers: A Survey of International Labour Migration, p. 1351.

International Migration Review, spring, 1995, Philip Martin, review of The Work of Strangers: A Survey of International Labour Migration, pp. 264-266; summer, 2000, review of Workers without Frontiers: The Impact of Globalization on International Migration, p. 247; winter, 2001, Mark J. Miller, review of Workers without Frontiers: The Impact of Globalization on International Migration, p. 1260.

Journal of Developmental Studies, June, 2001, Jonathan Perraton, review of Workers without Frontiers: The Impact of Globalization on International Migration, p. 165.

Journal of Economic Literature, March, 1996, review of The Work of Strangers: A Survey of International Labour Migration, pp. 243-244.

Times Literary Supplement, February 15, 2002, Teresa Hayter, review of The No-Nonsense Guide to International Migration, p. 31.

Wilson Quarterly, summer, 2000, review of Workers without Frontiers: The Impact of Globalization on International Migration, p. 120.



online


Peter Stalker Home Page,http://www.pstalker.com (July 8, 2003).

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