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Schott, John R. 1951-

Schott, John R. 1951-

PERSONAL:

Born November 9, 1951. Education: Canisius College, B.S. (magna cum laude), 1973; Syracuse University, M.S., 1978, Ph.D., 1980. Graduate study at University of Buffalo, 1974-75, and Canisius College, 1979-1980.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, 54 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, professor of imaging science and director, Digital Image and Remote Sensing Laboratory.

WRITINGS:

Remote Sensing: The Image Chain Approach, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1997, 2nd edition, 2007.

SIDELIGHTS:

John R. Schott leads a broad range of research projects for the defense and intelligence community. The focus of his research is the development of new remote sensing mechanisms and techniques that can be used to solve client problems. He heads the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Laboratory at Rochester Institute of Technology, where he is also a professor of imaging science. He explained in his faculty profile on the Center for Image Science, Rochester Institute of Technology Web site, his research focuses on the design of instruments that can be used to create overhead images of the earth, and the development of methods to extract relevant information from data obtained by remote instruments. In addition, his research involves "development of methods to generate synthetic images of what the earth would look like to airborne or satellite imaging systems." In the textbook Remote Sensing: The Image Chain Approach, Schott describes and analyzes the steps involved in the process of creating an overhead view of the earth by using remote sensing images from aircraft and satellites. Schott sees the remote sensing process as an "image chain" along which the various steps transfer relevant information.

In his article "Spectral Data Adds a New Dimension to Remote Imaging of Earth," published in Laser Focus World, Schott wrote that "remote sensing of Earth from overhead is rapidly taking on a new dimension as data from imaging spectrometers becomes more widely available. The spectral dimension has been used for more than half a century … [but] a full treatment of the spectral dimension … awaited the introduction of imaging spectrometers." These spectrometers, he explained further, can provide a three-dimensional representation of the Earth. "Two dimensions represent the spatial brightness variations on Earth's surface that form a conventional image. The third dimension—wavelength—represents a sampling of the spectral radiance reaching the sensor at each pixel." Data from remote spectrometers, he added, can be used to create maps that show general categories such as forested land, farmland, and desert, or even more detailed categories, such as deciduous or coniferous forests. What is more, he pointed out, "imaging spectroscopy is increasingly allowing scientists to ‘see’ the condition of materials and to monitor processes. The amount of liquid water in vegetation, for example, can be mapped to monitor irrigation need, drought damage, and fire fuel loadings." Other applications include mineral mapping, forestry, wetlands, agricultural, and rangeland management, and intelligence gathering for defense systems.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, April 1, 1998, review of Remote Sensing: The Image Chain Approach, p. 1403; October 1, 2007, W. Weston, review of Remote Sensing, p. 312.

Geological Magazine, November 1, 1999, Geoff Wadge, review of Remote Sensing, p. 702.

Laser Focus World, August, 2004, John R. Schott, "Spectral Data Adds a New Dimension to Remote Imaging of Earth," p. 76.

Physics Today, September 1, 1989, John R. Schott, "Remote Sensing of the Earth: A Synoptic View," p. 72.

SciTech Book News, September, 2007, review of Remote Sensing.

ONLINE

Center for Image Science, Rochester Institute of Technology Web site,http://www.cis.rit.edu/ (February 21, 2008), John Schott faculty profile.

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