Noland, Marcus 1959-

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Noland, Marcus 1959-

PERSONAL:

Born March 29, 1959, in Greensboro, NC. Education: Swarthmore College, B.A., 1981; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., 1985.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Peterson Institute for International Economics, 1750 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1207. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington, DC, senior fellow, 1985—; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, assistant professor, 1990-91; Council of Economic Advisers, Executive Office of the President of the United States, Washington, DC, senior economist, 1993-94; National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Urawa, Japan, visiting professor, 1988-89; Korea Developmental Institute, Seoul, visiting scholar, 1991; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, visiting associate professor, 1991-98; Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan, visiting professor, 1996; University of Ghana, visiting professor, 1997; International Food Policy Research Institute, consultant, 1999; East-West Center, Honolulu, HI, POSCO visiting fellow, 2000; Yale University, New Haven, CT, teaching positions, 2007—.

MEMBER:

Council on Foreign Relations.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, fellow, 1988; Council on Foreign Relations, International Affairs fellow, 1993; Council for the International Exchange of Scholars, fellow, 1997, 2004; Ohira Memorial prize, for Avoiding the Apocalypse: The Future of the Two Koreas, 2002.

WRITINGS:

(With Bela A. Balassa) Japan in the World Economy, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 1988.

Pacific Basin Developing Countries: Prospects for the Future, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 1990.

(With C. Fred Bergsten) Reconcilable Differences? United States-Japan Economic Conflict, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 1993.

(Editor, with C. Fred Bergsten) Pacific Dynamism and the International Economic System, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 1993.

(With others) Global Economic Effects of the Asian Currency Devaluations, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 1998.

(Editor) Economic Integration of the Korean Peninsula, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 1998.

The New Protectionists, Institute of International Economics (London, England), 1999.

Avoiding the Apocalypse: The Future of the Two Koreas, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 2000.

(With C. Fred Bergsten and Takatoshi Ito) No More Bashing: Building a New Japan-United States Economic Relationship, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 2001.

(With Howard Pack) Industrial Policy in an Era of Globalization: Lessons from Asia, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 2003.

Korea after Kim Jong-Il, Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 2004.

South Korea's Experience with International Capital Flows, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2005.

(With Stephan Haggard) Hunger and Human Rights: The Politics of Famine in North Korea, U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (Washington, DC), 2005.

(Editor, with Stephan Haggard) The North Korean Refugee Crisis: Human Rights and International Responses, U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (Washington, DC), 2006.

(With Brooks Spector) Diamonds and Development in Southern Africa, Business Leadership South Africa (Parktown, South Africa), 2006.

(With Howard Pack) The Arab Economies in a Changing World, Peterson Institute for International Economics (Washington, DC), 2007.

(With Stephan Haggard) Famine in North Korea: Markets, Aid, and Reform, Columbia University Press (New York, NY), 2007.

SIDELIGHTS:

Marcus Noland was born March 29, 1959, in Greensboro, North Carolina. He earned his undergraduate degree at Swarthmore College in 1981, and went on to continue his education at Johns Hopkins University, earning his doctoral degree in 1985. Noland is an expert in international economics, with a particular focus on the trade policy of the United States and its relationship to the political economy of both the U.S. and the nations with which it conducts business. He is also well versed in the ins and outs of the Asian financial crisis, and he has in-depth knowledge of both the Asian financial situation, particularly in Korea and Japan, and the political economy of Africa, having spent time both working and living in these regions over the course of his career. One of Noland's ongoing interests is the question of North Korea and the feasibility of unifying North and South Korea into a single, viable economy. Noland has worked as a senior fellow for the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, DC, since 1985. In addition, he served on the Council of Economic Advisers to the Executive Office of the President of the United States in the early 1990s, and has served as a visiting professor at various universities in the United States, Asia, and Africa. A prolific writer, he has written, cowritten, or edited a number of books on the state of the global economy and the effect of the Asian financial situation on both that region and on the nations with which they have trade agreements.

In Pacific Basin Developing Countries: Prospects for the Future, Noland addresses issues related to the economic development of the Pacific Basin nations, and how these changes relate both to the world economy as a whole, and to the United States specifically, and in particular the impact to the continued development of the U.S. economy. He focuses on Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand, with a look toward the industrialization of those regions. Noland offers readers an economic history of this part of Asia to serve as a foundation for his more technical analysis, which includes a look at future trade pattern expectations. He then extends this analysis to ways in which these trade patterns might reflect on the United States' existing trade routes. Dominique N. Khactu, in a review for the Southern Economic Journal, remarked that "although slim in weight, this volume contains much worthy information."

Reconcilable Differences? United States-Japan Economic Conflict, which Noland wrote with C. Fred Bergsten, addresses what the authors perceive to be an ongoing misconception regarding the nature of the political economy in Japan. Since the end of World War Two, economists and politicians have made broad announcements regarding supposed changes in the way that the Japanese government and the Japanese people run the nation and look at their economy, with each shift supposedly bringing the Japanese attitudes and way of life into a more modern, more American economic system in keeping with the reported wishes of the younger generations of Japanese citizens. The country is constantly reported as becoming more consumer-centric, with an eye toward participation in the global economy. However, Noland and Bergsten state that these declarations are more wishful thinking than based on facts, and it is these very false assumptions that lead to a disparate economic relationship between the United States and Japan. Japan has indeed become an economic force, however, they have built their power through their own efforts and achievements, and not through any attempt to work in conjunction with other global economic powerhouses. Nor is the goal of Japan to help stabilize the global economy; rather their interests are primarily self-driven. Because Japan and the United States together make up a large part of the world's trade and financial interests, it is important that the differences between their economic ideologies are clear. Proponents of the free-market society and approach to the global business model are unsure what to make of Japan's successful economy, particularly given that they cannot determine whether Japan has indeed adopted the free-market model, or if they have their own system that might ultimately undermine the U.S. approach. Karel von Wolferen, in a review for the National Interest, noted the effect of this ostrich-like behavior: "The Japanese must have organized their economic system according to free-market principles because they have been successful. If they haven't, this is scary, giving us ever more reason to insist that they have." Richard Cooper, writing for Foreign Affairs, pointed out that Noland and Bergsten focus primarily on Japan, despite the inclusion of the U.S. in their book's titles—a choice likely necessitated by this faulty impression of the state of Japan's economic situation. He concluded that the work is "a thoughtful, fact-filled book on a highly topical issue." M. Christopher Garman, reviewing for the Journal of International Affairs, opined that "the evenhanded and timely treatment of the U.S.-Japanese trade debate makes Reconcilable Differences? a very worthwhile and rewarding read for both the expert and the layperson. Bergsten and Noland have succeeded in synthesizing divergent viewpoints and raising the level of debate in a highly complex and ideologically charged controversy."

In Korea after Kim Jong-Il, published in 2004, Noland projects what might happen in North Korea when Kim Jong-Il is no longer in power. While his book technically addresses the interests of both North and South Korean, he nevertheless focuses primarily on the situation in North Korea as a result of that region's isolation, hypothesizing what might occur to end the situation, including an economic decline caused by its isolation, and a change in the leadership. Noland notes that the economic and political future of North Korea is of particular importance to the world, both economically and militarily, due to the ongoing production of missiles in that nation, and the question of their potential for nuclear armament. He begins with a discussion of what he means when he refers to political changes, and then goes on to address the ongoing decline in North Korea's gross domestic product, and how this is a reflection on the regime and the lack of growth opportunities resulting from the country's political stance. Paul Kuznets, in a review of the book for Comparative Economic Studies, remarked of Noland's discussion of the Korean situation: "Reform is needed, especially if the South is to be prepared for North Korean collapse, but this is less a matter of what to do than of how to muster the political support needed to implement reforms."

Noland, writing with Howard Pack, shifts direction with his book The Arab Economies in a Changing World, addressing a vital region in relation to the global economy, but not one which has been written about frequently in the past. The book addresses the issue of internal growth within the Arab nations, and their ongoing challenge to find ways to employ their youth in a rewarding manner—both financially and intellectually—in part to keep them from turning their attentions toward terrorist activities on either a local or an international scale. In an interview with Devin T. Stewart for the Carnegie Council Web site, Noland explained further: "A demographic imperative to create jobs, a questionable track record on globalization, and some deep uncertainty about political transitions—all work to create a very serious set of challenges for the region over the next decade or so."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

ASEAN Economic Bulletin, March, 1994, Ozay Mehmet, review of Pacific Dynamism and the International Economic System, p. 355; August, 1999, Anita Doraisami, review of Global Economic Effects of the Asian Currency Devaluations, p. 265.

Asian Affairs, November, 2004, J.E. Hoare, review of Korea after Kim Jong-Il, p. 438.

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, November, 1993, B. Mieczkowski, review of Reconcilable Differences? United States-Japan Economic Conflict, p. 505; December, 1993, B.F. Hope, review of Pacific Dynamism and the International Economic System, p. 648; May, 2001, B.F. Hope, review of Avoiding the Apocalypse: The Future of the Two Koreas, p. 1671; November, 2007, M. Akacem, review of The Arab Economies in a Changing World, p. 516.

Comparative Economic Studies, June, 2006, Paul Kuznets, review of Korea after Kim Jong-Il, p. 385.

Far Eastern Economic Review, May 31, 1990, Eamonn Fingleton, review of Japan in the World Economy, p. 38; June, 2007, "Famine in North Korea: Markets, Aid, and Reform," p. 62.

Foreign Affairs, September 1, 1993, Richard Cooper, review of Reconcilable Differences?, p. 157; March, 2001, review of Avoiding the Apocalypse, p. 172.

International Affairs, July, 1994, Richard Grant, review of Reconcilable Differences?, p. 552; October, 2001, Hazel Smith, review of Avoiding the Apocalypse, p. 1024.

International Journal, winter, 1989, review of Japan in the World Economy, pp. 175-177.

Journal of Asian Studies, February, 1992, Jung-En Woo, review of Pacific Basin Developing Countries: Prospects for the Future, p. 134; February, 2001, Lawrence Krause, review of Avoiding the Apocalypse, p. 238.

Journal of Common Market Studies, December, 1989, Brian Bridges, review of Japan in the World Economy, p. 189.

Journal of Comparative Economics, June, 1999, Jan Prybyla, review of Economic Integration of the Korean Peninsula, p. 387.

Journal of Economic Literature, December, 1991, review of Pacific Basin Developing Countries, p. 1856; December, 1994, Jean-Pierre Lehmann, review of Pacific Dynamism and the International Economic System, p. 1888; June, 1995, Michael J. Smitka, review of Reconcilable Differences?, p. 844; September, 1998, review of Economic Integration of the Korean Peninsula, p. 1569; March, 1999, review of Global Economic Effects of the Asian Currency Devaluations, p. 267; March, 2001, review of Avoiding the Apocalypse, p. 286; September, 2001, Doowon Lee, review of Avoiding the Apocalypse, p. 952; September, 2003, review of Industrial Policy in an Era of Globalization: Lessons from Asia, p. 1007.

Journal of International Affairs, summer, 1994, M. Christopher Garman, review of Reconcilable Differences?, pp. 308-312.

Journal of International Economics, November, 1989, Gary Saxonhouse, review of Japan in the World Economy, p. 381.

Kyklos, winter, 1994, Oliver Landmann, review of Pacific Dynamism and the International Economic System, p. 600.

National Interest, fall, 1993, Karel van Wolferen, review of Reconcilable Differences?, p. 85.

New York University Journal of International Law and Politics, fall, 1998, Sally O'Brien, review of Economic Integration of the Korean Peninsula; January 1, 1999, Jorge Ramirez, review of Global Economic Effects of the Asian Currency Devaluations, p. 668.

Pacific Affairs, spring, 2006, Avram Agov, review of Korea after Kim Jong-Il, p. 137.

Reference & Research Book News, August, 2003, review of Industrial Policy in an Era of Globalization, p. 90; November, 2007, review of The Arab Economies in a Changing World.

SAIS Review, June 22, 2007, "The Arab Economic Challenge," p. 225.

Southern Economic Journal, April, 1992, Dominique N. Khactu, review of Pacific Basin Developing Countries, p. 1137.

Survival, April, 2001, Balbina Y. Hwang, review of Avoiding the Apocalypse, p. 178.

World Economy, March, 1991, Kym Anderson, review of Pacific Basin Developing Countries, p. 114; September, 1999, David Vines, review of Global Economic Effects of the Asian Currency Devaluations, p. 1041.

ONLINE

Carnegie Council,http://www.cceia.org/ (April 16, 2007), Devin T. Stewart, "Devin Stewart Interviews Marcus Noland on the Arab Economies."

Milken Institute,http://www.milkeninstitute.org/ (March 24, 2008), author profile.

Peterson Institute for International Economics Web site,http://www.iie.com/ (March 24, 2008), author profile.

Policy Innocations,http://www.policyinnovations.org/ (March 24, 2008), author profile.

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