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Gorman, Edward 1941–

(Robert David Chase, Richard Driscoll, Jake Foster, E.J. Gorman, Ed Gorman, Edward Joseph Gorman, Christopher Keegan, Chris Shea Mccarrick, Chris North, Daniel Ransom)

PERSONAL: Born November 29, 1941, in Cedar Rapids, IA; son of Edward and Bernadine Gorman; married Kathleen Stevens (divorced, 1968); married Carol Maxwell (a novelist), 1982; children: Joseph Wyndham, Ben. Education: Coe College, Cedar Rapids, IA, graduated, 1968.

CAREER: Writer and editor. Worked in advertising as a writer and director of television commercials, 1968–87; publisher of Mystery Scene, 1985–.

AWARDS, HONORS: Bram Stoker Award Best Collection nominee, 1996, for Cages, and 2002, for The Dark Fantastic.

WRITINGS:

"LEO GUILD" SERIES; WESTERN NOVELS

Guild, M. Evans (New York, NY), 1987.

Death Ground, M. Evans (New York, NY), 1988.

Blood Game, M. Evans (New York, NY), 1989.

Dark Trail, M. Evans (New York, NY), 1990.

"JACK DWYER MYSTERY" SERIES

New, Improved Murder, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1985.

Murder Straight Up, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1986.

Murder in the Wings, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1986.

The Autumn Dead, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1987.

A Cry of Shadows, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1990.

The Night Remembers, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1991.

"ROBERT PAYNE" SERIES; UNDER NAME ED GORMAN

Blood Moon, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1994.

Hawk Moon, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1996.

Harlot's Moon, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1998.

Voodoo Moon, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2000.

"TOBIN MYSTERY" SERIES; UNDER NAME ED GORMAN

Murder on the Aisle, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1987.

Several Deaths Later, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1988.

"SAM MCCAIN" MYSTERY SERIES; UNDER NAME ED GORMAN

The Day the Music Died, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1999.

Wake Up Little Susie, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 2000.

Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 2001.

Everybody's Somebody's Fool, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 2002.

Save the Last Dance for Me, Worldwide (New York, NY), 2003.

Breaking Up Is Hard to Do, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 2004.

Fools Rush In, Pegasus Books (Waltham, MA), 2006.

"CALVARY MAN" SERIES; UNDER NAME ED GORMAN

Cavalry Man: The Killing Machine, HarperTorch (New York, NY), 2005.

Calvary Man: Powder Keg, HarperTorch (New York, NY), 2006.

SHORT STORIES

Prisoners: And Other Stories, C.D. Publications (Baltimore, MD), 1992.

Dark Whispers: And Other Stories, Pulphouse Publications (Eugene, OR), 1992.

The Best Western Stories of Ed Gorman, edited by Bill Pronzini and Martin H. Greenberg, Swallow Press/Ohio University Press (Athens, OH), 1992.

Moonchasers and Other Stories, Forge (New York, NY), 1996.

(Under name Ed Gorman) Famous Blue Raincoat: Mystery Stories, Crippen & Landru (Norfolk, VA), 1999.

The Dark Fantastic, Leisure Books (New York, NY), 2001.

Such A Good Girl and Other Crime Stories, introduction by Richard Laymon, Five Star, 2001.

(Under name Ed Gorman, with Susan Slater, Irene Marcuse, and Michael Jahn) Crooks, Crimes, and Christmas, Harlequin Enterprises Limited (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2003.

(Under name Ed Gorman) Branded (western stories), Berkley (New York, NY), 2004.

(Under name Ed Gorman) The Long Ride Back, Leisure Books (New York, NY), 2004.

(Under name Ed Gorman) Different Kinds of Dead and Other Tales, Five Star (Waterville, ME), 2005.

Also author of short story collection Cages, 1989.

Contributor of short stories to anthologies, including Criminal Elements, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1988; Felonious Assaults, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1989; and New Crimes, Robinson, 1990.

FICTION; UNDER NAME ED GORMAN

(With Max Allan Collins) Jim Thompson: The Killers inside Him, Fedora Press, 1983.

Rough Cut, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1985.

Grave's Retreat (historical novel), Doubleday (New York, NY), 1989.

Cold Blue Midnight, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1996.

Cage of Night, Trafalgar Square (North Pomfret, VT), 2000.

The Poker Club, Leisure Books (New York, NY), 2000.

Lawless, Berkley (New York, NY), 2000.

Ghost Town, Berkley (New York, NY), 2001.

Blood Game, Forge (New York, NY), 2001.

Rituals, DAW Books (New York, NY), 2002.

Vendetta (western), Berkley (New York, NY), 2002.

Lynched (western), Berkley (New York, NY), 2003.

Relentless (western), Berkley (New York, NY), 2003.

Gun Truth (western), Dorchester Publishing, 2003.

(Author of introduction) Russell Davis, Waltzing with the Dead, Wildside, 2004.

Bad Money, Berkley (New York, NY), 2005.

(With Dean Koontz) Dean Koontz's Frankenstein. Book Two, City of Night, Bantam Books (New York, NY), 2005.

Shoot First, Berkley (New York, NY), 2006.

Fast Track, Berkley (New York, NY), 2006.

Dean Koontz's Frankenstein: Dead and Alive, HarperCollins (London, England), 2007.

Also author of the novella Stalker, 2006; coauthor with Dean Koontz of the graphic novel Trapped, 1993; author of the chapbooks Out There in the Darkness, 1995, and Cast in Dark Waters, with Tom Piccirilli, 2002.

EDITOR; UNDER NAME ED GORMAN

(And author of introduction) The Second Black Lizard Anthology of Crime Fiction, Black Lizard (Berkeley, CA), 1989.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Stalkers: All New Tales of Terror and Suspense, Dark Harvest (Arlington Heights, IL), 1989.

(With Bob Randisi) Under the Gun (anthology of mystery stories), NAL Books (New York, NY), 1990.

Night Kills, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1990.

Dark Crimes: Great Noir Fiction from the '50s to the '90s, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1991.

Solved, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1991.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Cat Crimes, Donald I. Fine (New York, NY), 1991.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Cat Crimes II, Donald I. Fine (New York, NY), 1992.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Cat Crimes III, Donald I. Fine (New York, NY), 1992.

I, Werewolf, illustrated by Angelo Torres, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1992.

Wolf Moon, Fawcett Gold Medal (New York, NY), 1993.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Cat Crimes: A Large Print Anthology, G.K. Hall (Boston, MA), 1993.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Danger in D.C.: Cat Crimes in the Nation's Capital, Donald I. Fine (New York, NY), 1993.

(With Martin H. Greenberg, Larry Segriff, and Jon L. Breen) The Fine Art of Murder: The Mystery Reader's Indispensable Companion, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1993.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Predators, ROC (New York, NY), 1993.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Feline and Famous: Cat Crimes Goes Hollywood, Donald I. Fine (New York, NY), 1994.

(With Martin H. Greenberg and Bill Munster) The Dean Koontz Companion, Berkeley (New York, NY), 1994.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Woman on the Beat: Stories of Women Police Officers, Gramercy Books (New York, NY), 1995.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Cat Crimes Takes a Vacation, Donald I. Fine, 1995.

(With Martin H. Greenberg and Bill Pronzini) Gunslinger, and Nine Other Action-Packed Stories of the Wild West, Barricade Books (New York, NY), 1995.

(With Larry Segriff and Martin H. Greenberg) An Anthology of Angels, Glorya Hale Books (New York, NY), 1996.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Love Kills, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) The Fatal Frontier, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Bill Pronzini and Martin H. Greenberg) American Pulp, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1997.

A Modern Treasury of Great Detective and Murder Mysteries, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Martin H. Greenberg and Larry Segriff) Cat Crimes for the Holidays, Donald I. Fine (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Once Upon a Crime: Fairy Tales for Mystery Lovers, Berkley Prime Crime (New York, NY), 1998.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Speaking of Murder: Interviews with the Masters of Mystery and Suspense (two volumes), Berkley (New York, NY), 1998–99.

(With Kevin McCarthy) "They're Here—": Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Berkley (New York, NY), 1999.

(With Kirby McCauley and Martin H. Greenberg) Dashiell Hammett, Nightmare Town: Stories, Knopf (New York, NY), 1999.

(With Jon L. Breen and Martin H. Greenberg) Sleuths of the Century, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 2000.

(With Carol Gorman) Felonious Felines, Five Star (Unity, ME), 2000.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) The World's Finest Mystery and Crime Stories (annual; four volumes), Forge (New York, NY), 2000–03.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Desperadoes, Berkley (New York, NY), 2001.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Pulp Masters, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 2001.

(With Martin H. Greenberg and Larry Segriff) Murder Most Feline: Cunning Tales of Cats and Crime, Cumberland House (Nashville, TN), 2001.

(And contributor) The Blue and the Gray Undercover, Forge (New York, NY), 2001.

The World's Finest Mystery & Crime Stories, Forge (New York, NY), 2001.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) Guns of the West, Berkley (New York, NY), 2002.

Kittens, Cats, and Crime, Five Star (Waterville, ME), 2003.

(With Martin H. Greenberg and Larry Segriff) Murder Most Feline: Cunning Tales of Cats and Crime, Gramercy Books (New York, NY), 2003.

Stagecoach, Berkley (New York, NY), 2003.

(With Martin H. Greenberg) The Adventure of the Missing Detective: And 19 of the Year's Finest Crime and Mystery Stories!, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 2005.

Also editor, with Martin H. Greenberg, of The Widow of Slane: And Six More of the Best Crime and Mystery Novellas of the Year and The Deadly Bride: And 19 of the Year's Finest Crime and Mystery Stories, both 2006.

FICTION; UNDER NAME ROBERT DAVID CHASE

(With Ed and Lorraine Warren) Ghost Hunters: True Stories from the World's Most Famous Demonologists, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1989.

(With Ed and Lorraine Warren and Bill Ramsey) Werewolf: A Story of Demonic Possession, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1991.

(With Ed and Lorraine Warren) Graveyard: True Hauntings from an Old New England Cemetery, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1992.

FICTION; UNDER NAME DANIEL RANSOM

Daddy's Little Girl, Zebra (New York, NY), 1985.

Toys in the Attic, Zebra (New York, NY), 1986

Night Caller, Zebra (New York, NY), 1987.

The Forsaken, Zebra (New York, NY), 1988.

The Babysitter, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1989.

Nightmare Child, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1990.

The Long Midnight, Dell (New York, NY), 1992.

The Serpents Kiss, Dell (New York, NY), 1992.

The Fugitive Stars, Forge (New York, NY), 1995.

Zone Soldiers, DAW (New York, NY), 1996.

Night Screams (young adult), Avon (New York, NY), 1996.

Blackmail and Lace (western), Foggy Windows Books (Scarborough ME), 2001.

FICTION; UNDER NAME JAKE FOSTER

Two Guns to Yuma, Kensington Publishing (New York, NY), 1989, reprinted, Thorndike Press (Waterville, ME), 2005.

Three Rode South, Kensington Publishing (New York, NY), 1990.

Texas Noose, Kensington Publishing (New York, NY), 1990.

Hell-for-Leather Rider, Kensington Publishing (New York, NY), 1991.

Ramrod Revenge, Kensington Publishing (New York, NY), 1991.

FICTION; UNDER NAME E.J. GORMAN

The First Lady, Forge (New York, NY), 1995.

The Marilyn Tapes, Forge (New York, NY), 1995.

Senatorial Privilege, Forge (New York, NY), 1997.

FICTION; UNDER NAME RICHARD DRISCOLL

(With Kevin Randle) Star Precinct, Berkley (New York, NY), 1992.

(With Kevin Randle) Mind Slayer, (second in "Star Precinct" series), Berkley (New York, NY), 1992.

(With Kevin Randle) Inside Job (third in "Star Precinct" series), Berkley (New York, NY), 1992.

OTHER FICTION

(Editor, contributor, and author of introduction) Black Lizard Anthology of Crime Fiction, Black Lizard (Berkeley, CA), 1987.

(Editor) Westeryear: Stories about the West, Past and Present, M. Evans (New York, NY), 1988.

Night of Shadows (historical novel), Doubleday (New York, NY), 1990.

What the Dead Men Say (historical novel), M. Evans (New York, NY), 1990.

(Under name Christopher Keegan) Ride into Yesterday, Walker (New York, NY), 1992.

(Under name Chris Shea McCarrick) Run to Midnight, Ace (New York, NY), 1992.

(Under name Chris Shea McCarrick) Now You See Her, Berkley (New York, NY), 1993.

(Editor) A Modern Treasury of Great Detective and Murder Mysteries, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1994.

(Under name Chris North) Killer, William Morrow (New York, NY), 1995.

(Editor, with Martin H. Greenberg) The Fatal Frontier, Carroll & Graf (New York, NY), 1997.

Under name Robert David Chase, contributor to books, including Murder for Father, edited by Martin H. Greenberg, Signet (New York, NY), 1994; and Monster Brigade 3000, edited by Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh, Ace (New York, NY), 1996.

ADAPTATIONS: Relentless was made into an audio-book, Recorded Books, 2004.

SIDELIGHTS: Author and editor Edward Gorman spent twenty years in the advertising industry before finally breaking into freelance writing in the mid-1980s. Since embarking on his new career as a novelist and editor of mystery and western short-story anthologies, Gorman has become well known for his wit, his gritty prose, and the unique characters he creates. A Twentieth-Century Crime and Mystery Writers contributor noted that Gorman's novels are "an amalgam of pure entertainment, social commentary, symbolic statement, and in-depth studies of what he terms 'outsiders trying to make their peace with the world.'"

Gorman used his knowledge of the advertising business to write his first mystery, Rough Cut, in which disillusioned advertising executive Jack Ketchum must search through various layers of sleaze to find his former partner's killer. Gorman once remarked to CA that, "One advertising magazine called the novel 'a hate letter' to the advertising industry." Gorman went on to create the character Jack Dwyer, a security cop who moonlights as an actor, in a series of popular crime novels. In New, Improved Murder Dwyer's ex-girlfriend is found, gun in hand, near the body of her account-executive boyfriend in a whodunit that Jean M. White described as "a tangle of strange obsessions and relationships," in her review for the Washington Post Book World. Other Jack Dwyer mysteries include Murder Straight Up, Murder in the Wings, and The Autumn Dead, in which Dwyer investigates the death of his high-school sweetheart only to uncover a blackmail plot and other strange goings-on amidst an untimely class reunion.

Murder on the Aisle and Several Deaths Later both feature another of Gorman's popular off-beat detectives. Tobin, an alcoholic movie critic, makes guest appearances on television shows that provide him with plenty of opportunities for inadvertently staggering into compromising situations involving murder. Because of the popularity of his fictional detectives, Gorman's work is sought out by readers who enjoy his energetic plots and unpredictable endings. His books have also received consistently high marks from reviewers.

Gorman set his "Sam McCain" mystery series in Iowa during the 1950s. The protagonist is a lawyer, music enthusiast, and sometime private investigator. In The Day the Music Died McCain mourns the deaths of Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, and the Big Bopper, whose fatal plane crash occurred nearby, while he looks into the murders of a pregnant teen and a wealthy married couple. The Day the Music Died prompted Wes Lukowsky to write in Booklist that "Gorman is one of the genre's best craftsmen."

Gorman then wrote a "prequel" to The Day the Music Died titled Wake Up Little Susie. Set in 1957, the mystery begins when a young woman's dead body is discovered in a new Ford Edsel during a parade in McCain's town, Black River Falls. The victim is Susan Squires, the abused wife of an ambitious district attorney. The D.A. is the prime suspect until he is murdered soon after his wife. As McCain hunts for the killer, a Publishers Weekly contributor felt the author spent too much time discussing the "town's social intrigues and recounting Sam's love life" instead of getting to the center of the story. Nevertheless, the critic praised "Gorman's assured prose" and felt the "depiction of the town's rivalries keeps the tension strong."

Continuing his McCain series, Gorman tackles the Communist "Red Scare" of the 1950s with Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow. After attending an appearance by Nikita Khruschev, a liberal lawyer tells McCain that he would like to hire him. The next day, the lawyer is beaten and killed, but before he dies, he refuses to tell McCain who attacked him. McCain's investigation turns up more dead bodies; right-wing activists and anti-Communists. Rex Klett, writing in Library Journal, found Will You Still Love Me "exciting and intense," while a Publishers Weekly reviewer wrote, "Gorman adds plenty of apt references to the music, movies and personalities of the late '50s to make this trip a real blast from the past." Wes Lukowsky, writing in Booklist, called Gorman "an underappreciated master of the genre."

As well as achieving renown as a mystery writer, Gorman has gained a strong reputation as an author of western novels. As with his detective fiction, his western protagonists are unique in their tendency to exist outside the boundaries of normal society. Bounty hunter Leo Guild, one of Gorman's most popular western characters, is featured in Guild, Blood Game, and Death Ground, all of which take place in the late 1800s. "The Guild novels have a haunting, almost mystical quality that lifts them to the brink of allegory," noted a Twentieth-Century Crime and Mystery Writers contributor. Gorman does the unexpected in featuring a female protagonist in the western detective novel Night of Shadows. This work was inspired by the real-life story of the first uniformed policewoman in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in the late 1800s.

Gorman's involvement in detective and western fiction has included editing several well-received short story collections. Anthologies in the areas of suspense, western, and crime fiction include The Black Lizard Anthology of Crime Fiction, Westeryear: Stories about the West, Past and Present, and Dark Crimes: Great Noir Fiction from the '50s to the '90s, all of which have been highly praised by critics. In 2000, Gorman started an annual anthology, titled, The World's Finest Mystery and Crime Stories. Gorman's writing is inspired by the works of authors who he feels have broadened the various genres within which they worked. "My literary heroes, in addition to Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Graham Greene, are people who made of popular fiction more than the skeptics thought it could be," Gorman once told CA. "I have in mind Raymond Chandler, Ray Bradbury, John D. MacDonald, Ross McDonald, and Margaret Millar—writers who worked with the givens of their respective forms but imbued them with their own spiritual poetry."

Gorman has continued to write a wide range of fiction, including short stories and novels that encompass the genres of science fiction, mystery, historical thrillers, ghost stories, and westerns. Gorman's novel Save the Last Dance for Me is another entry in the "Sam McCain" mystery series. It takes place in the 1960's and finds McCain trying to find out who wants to kill the Reverend John Muldaur, a religious zealot with plenty of enemies. Unfortunately, McCain is barely started on the case when Muldaur dies on the pulpit from strychnine poisoning. A Kirkus Reviews contributor noted the story's "affectionate period detail."

In his collection of fifteen stories titled Different Kinds of Dead and Other Tales, Gorman presents a variety of strange tales written over a twenty-five-year period, including ghost stories, science fiction, and horror. Jackie Cassada, writing in Library Journal, referred to them as "superb storytelling." In the western genre, Gorman's novel What the Dead Men Say takes place in 1901 and combines a tale of revenge and a coming-of-age story when a man takes his nephew with him as he seeks to find and kill the men who murdered his daughter.

Gorman also continues to serve as editor of numerous story collections, such as The Blue and the Gray Undercover, a collection of Civil War stories about spying and espionage. A Kirkus Reviews contributor referred to the stories as "a diverting curio for Civil War buffs, as well as mystery and western fans." Another reviewer writing in Publishers Weekly commented on Gorman's own story contribution, noting that it has "a surprise ending to what is perhaps the saddest tale in the collection." Gorman has coedited several books with Martin H. Greenberg, including The Adventure of the Missing Detective: And 19 of the Year's Finest Crime and Mystery Stories! A Publishers Weekly contributor called the tales "superior stories augmented by various 'state of the mystery' reports." Another reviewer writing in Kirkus Reviews commented that "all [the stories] are worth the time."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

BOOKS

Twentieth-Century Crime and Mystery Writers, 3rd edition, St. James Press (Detroit, MI), 1991.

PERIODICALS

Booklist, May 15, 1992, Barbara Dupree, review of Cat Crimes II, p. 1664; September 1, 1992, Wes Lukowsky, review of Prisoners and Other Stories, p. 36; April 1, 1996, Emily Melton, review of Hawk Moon, p. 1346; November 1, 1996, Wes Lukowsky, review of Cold Blue Midnight, p. 483; January 1, 1997, Wes Lukowsky, review of The Fatal Frontier, p. 824; May 1, 1997, Emily Melton, review of Love Kills, p. 1482; February 15, 1998, Wes Lukowsky, review of Harlot's Moon, p. 988; June 1, 1998, Bill Ott, review of Speaking of Murder: Interviews with Masters of Mystery and Suspense, p. 1707; December 1, 1998, Jenny McLarin, review of Cat Crimes through Time, p. 652; January 1, 1999, Ray Olson, review of "They're Here …," p. 817, and Wes Lukowsky, review of The Day the Music Died, p. 837; April 15, 1999, Richard Bleiler, review of The Fine Art of Murder, p. 1464; November 15, 1999, David Pitt, review of The Poker Club, p. 607; January 1, 2000, Wes Lukowsky, review of Wake Up Little Susie, p. 884; November 15, 2000, Wes Lukowsky, review of Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?, p. 623.

Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2001, review of The Blue and the Gray Undercover, p. 1631, and review of Save the Last Dance for Me, p. 1648; January 1, 2006, review of The Adventure of the Missing Detective: And 19 of the Year's Finest Crime and Mystery Stories!, p. 18.

Library Journal, October 1, 1993, Rex E. Klett, review of Danger in D.C.: Cat Crimes in the Nation's Capitol; November 15, 1993, Denise Johnson, review of The Fine Art of Murder: The Mystery Reader's Indispensable Companion, p. 70; July, 1994, Rex E. Klett, review of Blood Moon, p. 133; July, 1995, Rex E. Klett, review of Cat Crimes Takes a Vacation, p. 127; May 1, 1997, Rex E. Klett, review of Love Kills, p. 144; February 1, 1998, Rex E. Klett, review of Harlot's Moon, p. 116; January, 1999, Rex E. Klett, review of The Day the Music Died, p. 164; May 1, 1999, Denise A. Garofalo, review of Till Death Do Us Part, p. 129; January, 2000, Rex E. Klett, review of Wake Up Little Susie, p. 166; January 1, 2001, Rex Klett, review of Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?, p. 162; July 1, 2005, Jackie Cassada, Different Kinds of Dead and Other Tales, p. 73.

New York Times Book Review, April 30, 1989, Marilyn Stasio, review of The Second Black Lizard Anthology of Crime Fiction, p. 45; March 21, 1999, Marilyn Stasio, review of The Day the Music Died, p. 26; September 19, 1999, Terry Teachout, review of Nightmare Town: Stories, p. 21; February 6, 2000, p. 24.

Publishers Weekly, June 5, 1987, Sybil Steinberg, review of Murder on the Aisle, p. 72; September 23, 1988, Sybil Steinberg, review of Several Deaths Later, p. 65; December 9, 1988, review of The Second Black Lizard Anthology of Crime Fiction, p. 58; October 27, 1989, Sybil Steinberg, review of Stalkers, p. 56; May 18, 1990, Sybil Steinberg, review of A Cry of Shadows, p. 72; June 15, 1990, Sybil Steinberg, review of What the Dead Men Say, p. 57; February 1, 1991, Sybil Steinberg, review of The Night Remembers, p. 69; May 31, 1991, review of Cat Crimes, p. 62; July 25, 1991, review of Dark Crimes: Great Noir Fiction from the '50s to the '90s, p. 40; September 20, 1991, review of Solved, p. 122; May 25, 1992, review of Cat Crimes II, p. 42; November 2, 1992, review of Cat Crimes III, p. 54; September 20, 1993, review of Danger in D.C.: Cat Crimes in the Nation's Capital, p. 65; June 27, 1994, review of Blood Moon, p. 60; September 19, 1994, review of Feline and Famous: Cat Crimes Goes Hollywood, p. 54; November 25, 1996, review of The Fatal Frontier, p. 59; October 27, 1997, review of Cat Crimes for the Holidays, p. 56; January 5, 1998, review of Harlot's Moon, p. 61; November 16, 1998, review of Cat Crimes through Time, p. 58; November 23, 1998, review of The Day the Music Died, p. 62; August 9, 1999, review of Wake Up Little Susie, p. 343; October 4, 1999, review of Wake Up Little Susie, p. 68; December 20, 1999, review of Wake Up Little Susie, p. 59; October 30, 2000, review of Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?, p. 49; November 5, 2001, review of The Blue and the Gray Undercover, p. 41; December 5, 2005, review of The Adventure of the Missing Detective, p. 35.

Washington Post Book World, January 19, 1986, Jean M. White, review of New, Improved Murder, p. 10.

Wilson Library Bulletin, February, 1984, Kathleen Maio, review of Jim Thompson: The Killers Inside Him, p. 400; May, 1991, Kathleen Maio, review of The Night Remembers, p. 133; February, 1994, review of The Fine Art of Murder: The Mystery Reader's Indispensable Companion, p. 66.

ONLINE

Coe College Web site, http://www.coe.edu/ (October 19, 2006), brief faculty profile of author.

Fantasy Fiction, http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/ (October 26, 2003).

Locus, http://www.locusmag.com/ (October 26, 2003).

Gorman, Edward 1941–

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