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Garber, Peter M.

Garber, Peter M.

PERSONAL:

Male.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Peter M. Garber, Deutsche Bank, 60 Wall St., New York, NY 10005; fax: 212-250-2628. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER:

Professor, global markets researcher, and writer. Brown University, Providence, RI, professor of economics; Deutsche Bank, Global Markets Research, New York, NY, global strategist.

WRITINGS:

(With Steven R. Weisbrod) The Economics of Banking, Liquidity, and Money, D.C. Heath (Lexington, MA), 1992.

(Editor) The Mexico-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, MIT Press (Cambridge, MA), 1993.

(With Robert P. Flood) Speculative Bubbles, Speculative Attacks, and Policy Switching, MIT Press (Cambridge, MA), 1994.

(With Michael G. Spencer) The Dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire: Lessons for Currency Reform, International Finance Section, Princeton University (Princeton, NJ), 1994.

Transition to a Functional Financial Safety Net in Latin America, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of the Chief Economist (Washington, DC), 1997.

Famous First Bubbles: The Fundamentals of Early Manias, MIT Press (Cambridge, MA), 2000.

(With Michael P. Dooley and David Folkerts-Landau) The U.S. Current Account Deficit and Economic Development: Collateral for a Total Return Swap, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2004.

(With Michael P. Dooley and David Folkerts-Landau) Interest Rates, Exchange Rates and International Adjustment, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2005.

SIDELIGHTS:

Brown University professor of economics Peter M. Garber has written extensively on topics ranging from global markets strategies to stock market bubbles. Among his first published books was a compilation of essays about the potential economic impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (The Mexico-U.S. Free Trade Agreement), a group of papers concerning extreme economic events (Speculative Bubbles, Speculative Attacks, and Policy Switching), and an essay detailing the stabilization of Austrian and Hungarian currencies following World WarI (The Dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire: Lessons for Currency Reform).

Famous First Bubbles: The Fundamentals of Early Manias generated some scholarly controversy because of Garber's key argument: that three frequently cited historical examples of irrational market behavior are based on conjecture and can be reasonably explained with solid research. The argument had particular merit in 2000 when the book was published, in the midst of what would become a well-documented crash of the technology market. Web Techniques contributor Eugene Eric Kim commented: "Garber's storytelling is compelling, and his thesis is intriguing. He writes clearly and concisely." Steffan Heuer described the book in an Industry Standard article as "fascinating," further noting: "Although Garber's book is stuffed with potentially eye-glazing numbers and charts, he lays out his argument with an engaging whiff of irony."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Industry Standard, August 21, 2000, Steffan Heuer, review of Famous First Bubbles: The Fundamentals of Early Manias, p. 144.

Web Techniques, July, 2001, Eugene Eric Kim, review of Famous First Bubbles, p. 70.

ONLINE

National Bureau of Economic Research,http://www.nber.org/ (November 21, 2006), author contact information.*

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