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Carter, C. Barry

Carter, C. Barry

PERSONAL:

Education: Cambridge University, B.A. 1970, Sc.D., 2005; Imperial College, M.Sc. 1971; Oxford University, D. Phil., 1975; Cornell University, postdoctoral fellow.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 410 Amundson Hall, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, began as assistant professor, became professor of material science and engineering, 1979-1991; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, professor and 3M endowed chair of chemical engineering and materials science, 1991—. Bristol University, Bristol, England, visiting professor and Guggenheim fellow, 1985-86; Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM, Bernd Matthias Scholar, 1997-98; Peterhouse College, Cambridge, England, 2005; 2005 Jubilee Professor, Chalmers Institute of Technology, Göteborg, Germany, 2004.

AWARDS, HONORS:

A.V. Humboldt Award, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Hannover, Germany, and Material Products Institute, Stuttgart, Germany, 1998.

WRITINGS:

(With David B. Williams) Transmission Electron Microscopy: A Textbook for Materials Science, Plenum Press (New York, NY), 1996.

(Editor, with others) Interfacial Engineering for Optimized Properties: Symposium Held December 2-5, 1996, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., Materials Research Society (Pittsburgh, PA), 1997.

(Editor, with others) Interfacial Engineering for Optimized Properties II: Symposium Held December 1-2, 1999, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., Materials Research Society (Warrendale, PA), 2000.

(Editor, with others) Structure-Property Relationships of Oxide Surfaces and Interfaces: Symposium Held November 27-29, 2000, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., Materials Research Society (Warrendale, PA), 2001.

(With M. Grant Norton) Ceramic Materials: Science and Engineering, Springer (New York, NY), 2007.

SIDELIGHTS:

C. Barry Carter is a professor of chemical engineering and materials science at the University of Minnesota, and the author of Transmission Electron Microscopy: A Textbook for Materials Science. The volume is particularly important, wrote John J. Hren in American Scientist, because interpretation of the images produced by a transmission electron microscope are very different from those produced in a scanning electron microscope. Transmission electron microscopy relies on diffraction rather than reflection to create its images, and the angle of diffraction depends on a variety of different criteria, including the nature of the substance being examined, the way in which the specimen in the microscope was prepared, and the conditions under which the microscope itself is being used. All these variables shape the information being returned. The fact that so many of them can affect the image means that operators require extensive training in order to operate the devices so they receive good results.

Transmission electron microscopes are particularly useful for material scientists because they can be used for chemical composition analysis by observing x-rays thrown off by the sample or by measuring the amount of energy lost by the electrons that pass through the sample. "The electron microscope has become an analytical machine that can simultaneously give details of microstructure (nanostructure), crystallography, composition and even local atomic bonding," Hren stated. "Having worked with AEM since its early development, the authors present their approach to analyses with elegance and directness."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

American Scientist, January 1, 1998, John J. Hren, review of Transmission Electron Microscopy: A Textbook for Materials Science, p. 96.

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, October, 2007, H. Giesche, review of Ceramic Materials: Science and Engineering, p. 314.

SciTech Book News, March, 2001, review of Interfacial Engineering for Optimized Properties, p. 129; June, 2002, review of Structure-property Relationships of Oxide Surfaces and Interfaces, p. 71; September, 2003, review of Structure-Property Relationships of Oxide Surfaces and Interfaces: Symposium Held November 27-29, 2000, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., p. 58.

ONLINE

National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health Web site,http://www2a.cdc.gov/ (February 17, 2008), author profile.

Tenth Conference on Frontiers of Electron Microscopy in Material Science Web site,http://www.er-c.org/ (February 17, 2008), author bio.

University of Minnesota, Department of Chemical Engineering & Material Science Web site,http://www.mrsec.umn.edu/ (February 17, 2008), author profile.

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