Calomiris, Charles William 1957–

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Calomiris, Charles William 1957–

PERSONAL:

Born November 8, 1957, in Washington, DC; son of William and Mary Calomiris; married Nancy Wolf, October 29, 1988; children: Zoi Nicoletta, Eleni Sophia. Education: Yale University, B.A., 1979; Stanford University, Ph.D., 1985.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Scarsdale, NY. Office—Columbia Business School, 3022 Broadway, Uris Hall 601, New York, NY 10027. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, assistant professor of economics, 1984-91; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Wharton School of Business, visiting associate professor, 1991-92; University of Illinois, Urbana, associate professor, 1992-96; Columbia University, New York, NY, Paul M. Montrone professor of finance and economics, 1996-2003, Henry Kaufman professor of financial institutions, 2003—, Jerome Chazen Institute of International Business, academic director, 2004—, Center for International Business and Education Research, director, 2005-07. National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, MA, research associate, 1991, 1996—; codirector for the project on finance deregulation at the American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC, 1997—; Gauss Fund, LP, managing partner; consultant or visiting scholar for the Federal Reserve Banks of New York City, Chicago, Cleveland, St. Louis, and Philadelphia, the Federal Reserve Board, the World Bank, and the governments of Mexico, Argentina, Japan, China, El Salvador, Connecticut, and Massachusetts; serves on the editorial boards for the Journal of Banking and Finance, Journal of Financial Services Research, Journal of Financial Intermediation, Journal of Economic History, Journal of Economics and Business, and Explorations in Economic History.

MEMBER:

Greater Atlantic Financial Corporation (chair), Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee, Hillman Capital Management (advisory board, 2001—), Mercia Corporation (board member, 2004—), Axion Estin Foundation (vice president, 2005—), Suvidha Starnet Ltd. (board member, 2006—).

AWARDS, HONORS:

National Science Foundation Research grantee, 1994-96.

WRITINGS:

Universal Banking and the Financing of Industrial Development, World Bank (Washington, DC), 1995.

(With Charles P. Himmelberg) Government Credit Policy and Industrial Performance: Japanese Machine Tool Producers, 1963-1991, World Bank (Washington, DC), 1995.

The Postmodern Bank Safety Net: Lessons from Developed and Developing Economies, AEI Press (Washington, DC), 1997.

(With Jason Karceski) Is the Bank Merger Wave of the 1990s Efficient? Lessons from Nine Case Studies, AEI Press (Washington, DC), 1998.

(With Joseph R. Mason) High Loan-to-Value Mortgage Lending: Problem or Cure?, AEI Press (Washington, DC), 1999.

(With Andrew Powell) Can Emerging Market Bank Regulators Establish Credible Discipline? The Case of Argentina, 1992-1999, Banco Central de la República Argentina (Buenos Aires, Argentina), 2000.

U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 2000.

(With David O. Beim) Emerging Financial Markets, McGraw-Hill/Irwin (Boston, MA), 2001.

A Global Manifesto for Public Policy, Institute for Economic Affairs (Washington, DC), 2002.

(With Joseph R. Mason) Resolving the Puzzle of the Underissuance of National Bank Notes, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2004.

(With Daniela Klingebiel and Luc Laeven) A Taxonomy of Financial Crisis Resolution Mechanisms: Cross-country Experience, World Bank (Washington, DC), 2004.

(With Donna M. Hitscherich) Banker Fees and Acquisition Premia for Targets in Cash Tender Offers: Challenges to the Popular Wisdom on Banker Conflicts, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2005.

(With Thanavut Pornrojnangkool) Monopoly-creating Bank Consolidation? The Merger of Fleet and BankBoston, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2005.

(With Antonio Geldson de Carvalho and Joao Amaro de Matos) Venture Capital as Human Resource Management, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2005.

U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 2006.

Bank Failures in Theory and History [Electronic Resource]: The Great Depression and Other "Contagious" Events, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2007.

(With Doron Nissim) Activity-based Valuation of Bank Holding Companies, National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge, MA), 2007.

(Editor) China's Financial Transition at a Crossroads, Columbia University Press (New York, NY), 2007.

(Editor, with Jagdish N. Bhagwati) Sustaining India's Growth Miracle, Columbia University Press (New York, NY), 2008.

Contributor to numerous books and academic journals.

SIDELIGHTS:

Charles William Calomiris was born November 8, 1957, in Washington, DC. He studied economics in college, earning his undergraduate degree at Yale University and continuing on to earn his doctorate, also in economics, at Stanford University. He began to teach at the university level in 1984, when he became an assistant professor of economics at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. He continued teaching, first at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, then the University of Illinois at Urbana, and then ultimately at Columbia University's Graduate School of Business, where he began as the Paul M. Montrone professor of finance and economics and then, in 2003, became the Henry Kaufman professor of financial institutions. In addition, Calomiris serves as the academic director for Columbia's Jerome Chazen Institute of International Business. He also works as a research associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research, is a managing partner of Gauss Fund, LP, and serves as either a consultant or a visiting scholar for the Federal Reserve Banks of New York, Chicago, Cleveland, St. Louis, and Philadelphia, the Federal Reserve Board, the World Bank, and the governments of Mexico, Argentina, Japan, China, El Salvador, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. Calomiris also sits on the editorial boards for a number of journals and periodicals, such as the Journal of Banking and Finance, Journal of Financial Services Research, Journal of Financial Intermediation, Journal of Economic History, Journal of Economics and Business, and Explorations in Economic History. An expert in banking and global finance, Calomiris has studied at the World Bank as well as teaching there. He is the author of numerous books pertaining to universal finance and banking.

In U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, Calomiris collects a number of articles, most of which have been previously published, pertaining to the global financial system as it relies on banks, analyzing the stability of the various institutions and the global structure as a whole. The articles cover topics such as the insurance that supposedly covers investors up to a certain dollar amount and ways in which investment banking institutions can be competitive. Regarding the questionable stability of the banking industry as a whole, Calomiris places the blame on the way in which the industry itself is organized, pointing a finger at the means by which federal and local government regulations limit the ways in which a bank may branch. George J. Benston, in a review for the Cato Journal, noted that, despite the new introduction, the various articles in their original forms fail to blend easily one to the next, but he ultimately found the whole to be "an excellent empirical compilation with great analyses of data that are relevant to many of the issues that confront us today."

Calomiris served as the editor for China's Financial Transition at a Crossroads, a book that takes a hard look at the structure of China's financial system and how its inherent weakness is putting a damper on the overall growth potential of the Chinese economy. The various contributors discuss the different aspects of the Chinese economy, from the banking system, to credit that is proliferated from the banks, to assorted businesses that are backed by the state, as well as to the general consumer public. Richard N. Cooper, in a review for Foreign Affairs, rightfully pointed out that the economy in China has been undergoing such a rapid set of changes that no book would be able to keep up, as most of its information would be out of date by the time the volume hits the shelves. Cooper concluded, however, that "this is an excellent overview of China's financial markets."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Business History Review, March 22, 2001, Richard S. Grossman, review of U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, p. 215.

Cato Journal, January 1, 2001, George J. Benston, review of U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, p. 487.

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, December 1, 2000, J. Prager, review of U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, p. 752.

Economic Journal, February 1, 2002, review of U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, p. 144.

Foreign Affairs, November 1, 2007, Richard N. Cooper, review of China's Financial Transition at a Crossroads, p. 186.

Journal of Economic History, September 1, 2001, Richard Sylla, review of U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, p. 841.

Journal of Economic Literature, September 1, 2000, review of U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, p. 655; March 1, 2001, review of U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, p. 224.

NBER Reporter, December 22, 1994, "Historical Macroeconomic and American Macroeconomic History," p. 57.

Regulation, June 22, 2001, Peter Van Doren, review of U.S. Bank Deregulation in Historical Perspective, p. 62.

ONLINE

AEI,http://www.aei.org/ (June 18, 2008), author profile.

Columbia University Graduate School of Business,http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/ (June 18, 2008), faculty profile.

Global List,http://www.theglobalist.com/ (June 18, 2008), author profile.