Abinales, Patricio N.

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ABINALES, Patricio N.

PERSONAL:

Male. Education: University of the Philippines, B.A.; Cornell University, M.A., Ph.D.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Kyoto, Japan. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER:

Kyoto University, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto, Japan, associate professor.

WRITINGS:

(Editor) The Revolution Falters: The Left in Philippine Politics after 1986, Southeast Asia Program Publications (Ithaca, NY), 1996.

Images of State Power: Essays on Philippine Politics from the Margins, University of the Philippines Press (Quezon, Philippines), 1998.

Making Mindanao: Cotabato and Davao in the Formation of the Philippine Nation-State, Ateneo de Manila University Press (Quezon, Philippines), 2000.

Fellow Traveler: Essays on Filipino Communism, University of the Philippines Press (Quezon, Philippines), 2001.

Love, Sex, and Filipino Communism; or, Hinggil sa pagpipigil ng panggigigil, Anvil Publications (Manila, Philippines), 2004.

(Editor, with Ishikawa Noboru and Tanabe Akio) Dislocating Nation-States: Globalization in Asia and Africa, Trans Pacific Press (Melbourne, Australia), 2005.

(Editor, with Shiraishi Takashi) After the Crisis: Hegemony, Technocracy, and Governance in Southeast Asia, Trans Pacific Press (Melbourne, Australia), 2005.

(With Donna J. Amoroso) State and Society in the Philippines, Rowman & Littlefield (Lanham, MD), 2005.

Member of editorial board and Southeast Asian editor, Critical Asian Studies.

SIDELIGHTS:

Patricio N. Abinales is a scholar whose research focuses on the Philippines and the ways in which U.S. political and economic policies affect the region, Philippine nationalism, and Mindanao. He has also extensively researched the origins of the communist position in opposition to the Marcos regime, particularly in the southern portion of the country. His first book, The Revolution Falters: The Left in Philippine Politics after 1986, is a collection of six essays that address the notion that, even after the fall of the Marcos regime, those inclined toward the left of the political spectrum were maintaining their stand despite the fact that there was no longer anything to stand against. Mary Somers Heidhues concluded in a review for Journal of Southeast Asian Studies: "The collection is well-researched, using contemporary press reports, documents, field work, and participant interviews, and it displays sympathy toward those who want change in Philippine society without losing its scholarly balance." "This is an important book," declared Robert L. Youngblood in Pacific Affairs. "While each chapter stands on it own, together they provide an informative picture of the CPP [Communist Party of the Philippines]. Additionally, the book's footnotes are a gold mine for further research. Abinales and his coauthors are to be congratulated."

Making Mindanao: Cotabato and Davao in the Formation of the Philippine Nation-State looks at attempts to transform the Philippines into a solid state through the integration of various sub-populations. Ivan Molloy, in a review for Pacific Affairs, reported that "Abinales' historical approach rightly pays significant attention to the U.S. colonial period and how the U.S. military resisted Mindanao and the Muslim Filipinos' (Moros) integration into the rest of the Philippines during the initial years of the republic." He concluded that although in "explaining Philippine state-making it falls short," he felt "it is worthy in its contribution as a selective history."

State and Society in the Philippines provides not just a general history of the Philippines, but also an explanation regarding its status as a nation-state and the dynamics responsible for the creation of the country's politics, economy, and history since the Spanish period. Noel M. Morada, in a review for Contemporary Southeast Asia, concluded that the book is "quite successful in describing and explaining the changing nature and character of the state throughout different periods in Philippine history."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Contemporary Southeast Asia, December, 2005, Noel M. Morada, review of State and Society in the Philippines, p. 532.

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, July-August, 2006, G.A. McBeath, review of State and Society in the Philippines, p. 2068.

Journal of Asian Studies, November, 2003, Paul D. Hutchcroft, review of Making Mindanao: Cotabato and Davao in the Formation of the Philippine Nation-State, p. 1313.

Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, September, 1997, Mary Somers Heidhues, review of The Revolution Falters: The Left in Philippine Politics after 1986, p. 443.

Pacific Affairs, summer, 1998, Robert L. Youngblood, review of The Revolution Falters, p. 280; winter, 2002, Ivan Molloy, review of Making Mindanao, p. 648; winter, 2005, Aprodicio Laquian, review of State and Society in the Philippines, p. 681.

Reference & Research Book News, August, 2005, review of After the Crisis: Hegemony, Technocracy, and Governance in Southeast Asia, p. 51; review of State and Society in the Philippines, p. 53; review of Dislocating Nation-States: Globalization in Asia and Africa, p. 97.

ONLINE

Shifting Terrain,http://shiftingterrain.com/ (July 24, 2006), brief biography of Patricio N. Abinales.