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Schulz, Charles M. 1922–2000

Schulz, Charles M. 1922–2000

(Charles Monroe Schulz)

PERSONAL: Born November 26, 1922, in Minneapolis, MN; died of colon cancer, February 12, 2000, in Santa Rosa, CA; son of Carl (a barber) and Dena (Halverson) Schulz; married Joyce Halverson, April 18, 1949 (divorced, 1972); married Jean Clyde (some sources say last name was Forsyth), 1973; children: (first marriage) Meredith, Charles Monroe, Craig, Amy, Jill. Education: Studied cartooning in art school, 1940. Hobbies and other interests: Outdoor sports, especially ice hockey and golf.

CAREER: Cartoonist and illustrator. Art instructor at Art Instruction Schools, Inc. (correspondence school), Minneapolis, MN; cartoonist, St. Paul Pioneer Press and Saturday Evening Post, 1948–49; creator of syndicated comic strip, "Peanuts," 1950. Military service: U.S. Army, 1943–45, served with Twentieth Armored Division in Europe; became staff sergeant.

AWARDS, HONORS: Reuben Award as outstanding cartoonist of the year, National Cartoonists' Society, 1955 and 1964; Yale Humor Award as outstanding humorist of the year, 1956; School Bell Award, National Education Association, 1960; L.H.D., Anderson College, 1963; Peabody Award and Emmy Award, both 1966, for CBS cartoon special, "A Charlie Brown Christmas"; D.H.L., St. Mary's College of California, 1969; named International Cartoonist of the Year, International Pavilion of Humor (Montreal, Canada), 1978; Charles M. Schulz Award, United Feature Syndicate, 1980, for his contribution in the field of cartooning; Ordre des arts et des lettres (France), 1990; named one of top twenty-five newspaper people of the twentieth century, Editor and Publisher, 1999; Lifetime Achievement Award, National Cartoonists' Society, 2000; Congressional Gold Medal, 2000.

WRITINGS:

CARTOON BOOKS

Peanuts, Rinehart (New York, NY), 1952.

More Peanuts, Rinehart (New York, NY), 1954.

Good Grief, More Peanuts!, Rinehart (New York, NY), 1956.

Good Ol' Charlie Brown, Rinehart (New York, NY), 1957.

Snoopy, Rinehart (New York, NY), 1958.

Young Pillars, Warner Press (Anderson, IN), 1958.

But We Love You, Charlie Brown, Rinehart (New York, NY), 1959.

Peanuts Revisited: Favorites Old and New, Rinehart (New York, NY), 1959.

You're out of Your Mind, Charlie Brown, Rinehart (New York, NY), 1959.

"Teenager" Is Not a Disease, Warner Press (Anderson, IN), 1961.

Happiness Is a Warm Puppy, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1962, enlarged edition, 1979.

Security Is a Thumb and a Blanket, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1963, reprinted, 1983.

Christmas Is Together-Time, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1964.

I Need All the Friends I Can Get, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1964, reprinted, 1981.

What Was Bugging Ol' Pharaoh?, Warner Press (Anderson, IN), 1964.

A Charlie Brown Christmas (adapted from the television production), World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1965, reprinted, Miniature Editions (Philadelphia, PA), 2003.

Love Is Walking Hand in Hand, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1965.

Charlie Brown's All-Stars (adapted from the television production), World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1966.

Home Is on Top of a Doghouse, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1966, reprinted, 1982.

Charlie Brown's Reflections, Hallmark (Kansas City, MO), 1967.

Happiness Is a Sad Song, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1967.

It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1967.

Teenagers, Unite!, Bantam (New York, NY), 1967.

"He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown!" (adapted from the television production), World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1968.

Suppertime!, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1968.

You're in Love, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1968.

Charlie Brown's Yearbook (includes "He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown!"; It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown; You're in Love, Charlie Brown; and Charlie Brown's All-Stars), World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1969.

Peanuts School Year Date Book, 1969–1970, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1969.

For Five Cents, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1970.

It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1970.

It Really Doesn't Take Much to Make a Dad Happy, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1970.

Peanuts Date Book 1972, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1970.

It's Fun to Lie Here and Listen to the Sounds of the Night, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1970, reprinted, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2002.

The World according to Lucy, Hallmark (Kansas City, MO), 1970.

Winning May Not Be Everything, But Losing Isn't Anything!, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1970.

Play It Again, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1971.

You're Elected, Charlie Brown, World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1972.

Snoopy's Secret Life, Hallmark (Kansas City, MO), 1972.

The Peanuts Philosophers, Hallmark (Kansas City, MO), 1972.

Love à la Peanuts, Hallmark (Kansas City, MO), 1972.

It's Good to Have a Friend, Hallmark (Kansas City, MO), 1972.

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving, Random House (New York, NY), 1974.

There's No Time for Love, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), Random House (New York, NY), 1974.

It's a Mystery, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1975.

Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1976.

It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), Random House (New York, NY), 1976.

You're a Good Sport, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1976.

Hooray for You, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1977.

It's Another Holiday, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1977.

Summers Fly, Winters Walk, Volumes I-II, Holt (New York, NY), 1977, Volume III, Fawcett, 1980.

It's Arbor Day, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), Random House (New York, NY), 1977.

The Loves of Snoopy, Hodder & Stoughton (London, England), 1978.

Lucy Rules OK?, Hodder & Stoughton (London, England), 1978.

The Misfortunes of Charlie Brown, Hodder & Stoughton (London, England), 1978.

Snoopy and His Friends, Hodder & Stoughton (London, England), 1978.

What a Nightmare, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1978.

It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), Random House (New York, NY), 1978.

Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown, and Don't Come Back! (adapted from the film production), Random House (New York, NY), 1980.

You're Not Elected, Charlie Brown, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1980.

Life Is a Circus, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), Random House (New York, NY), 1981.

She's a Good Skate, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), Random House (New York, NY), 1981.

Also author of Snoopy on Wheels, 1983; Snoopy and the Twelve Days of Christmas, 1984; Peanuts at School, 1986; and If Beagles Could Fly, 1990.

PUBLISHED BY HOLT (NEW YORK, NY)

Go Fly a Kite, Charlie Brown, 1960.

Peanuts Every Sunday, 1961.

It's a Dog's Life, Charlie Brown, 1962.

Snoopy Come Home, 1962.

You Can't Win, Charlie Brown, 1962.

You Can Do It, Charlie Brown, 1963.

As You Like It, Charlie Brown, 1964.

We're Right behind You, Charlie Brown, 1964.

There's a Vulture Outside, 1965.

Sunday's Fun Day, Charlie Brown, 1965.

You Need Help, Charlie Brown, 1965.

Snoopy and the Red Baron, 1966.

The Unsinkable Charlie Brown, 1966.

What's Wrong with Being Crabby?, 1966, reprinted, 1992.

Who's the Funny-Looking Kid with the Big Nose?, 1966.

You're Something Else, Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1967.

It's a Long Way to Tipperary, 1967.

You'll Flip, Charlie Brown, 1967.

Peanuts Treasury (American Library Association Notable Book), foreword by Johnny Hart, 1968.

You're You, Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1968.

A Boy Named Charlie Brown (adapted from the film production), 1969.

You've Had It, Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1969.

Snoopy and His Sopwith Camel, 1969.

Peanuts Classics, 1970.

Snoopy and "It Was a Dark and Stormy Night," 1970.

You're Out of Sight, Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1970.

You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1971.

"Ha Ha, Herman," Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1972.

Snoopy's Grand Slam, 1972.

The "Snoopy, Come Home" Movie Book (adapted from the film production), 1972.

Thompson Is in Trouble, Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1973.

You're the Guest of Honor, Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1973.

The Snoopy Festival, 1974.

Win a Few, Lose a Few, Charlie Brown: A New Peanuts Book, 1974.

Speak Softly, and Carry a Beagle: A New Peanuts Book, 1975.

Don't Hassle Me with Your Sighs, Chuck, 1976.

"I Never Promised You an Apple Orchard": The Collected Writings of Snoopy, Being a Compendium of His Puns, Correspondence, Cautionary Tales, Witticisms, Titles Original and Borrowed, with Critical Commentary by His Friends, and, Published for the First Time in Its Entirety, the Novel "Toodleoo, Caribou!," a Tale of the Frozen North, 1976.

Always Stick Up for the Underbird: Cartoons from "Good Grief, More Peanuts!," and "Good Ol' Charlie Brown," 1977.

It's Great to Be a Superstar: Cartoons from "You're Out of Sight, Charlie Brown," and "You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown," 1977.

How Long, Great Pumpkin, How Long?: Cartoons from "You're the Guest of Honor, Charlie Brown," and "Win a Few, Lose a Few, Charlie Brown," 1977.

It's Hard Work Being Bitter: Cartoons from "Thompson Is in Trouble, Charlie Brown," and "You're the Guest of Honor, Charlie Brown," 1977.

There Goes the Shutout: Cartoons from "More Peanuts" and "Good Grief, More Peanuts!," 1977.

My Anxieties Have Anxieties: Cartoons from "You're You, Charlie Brown," and "You've Had It, Charlie Brown," 1977.

Sandlot Peanuts, introduction by Joe Garagiola, 1977.

A Smile Makes a Lousy Umbrella: Cartoons from "You're Something Else, Charlie Brown," and "You're You, Charlie Brown," 1977.

Stop Snowing on My Secretary: Cartoons from "You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown," and "Ha Ha, Herman, Charlie Brown," 1977, reprinted, 1992.

The Beagle Has Landed, 1978.

Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown (adapted from the television production), 1978.

Snoopy's Tennis Book: Featuring Snoopy at Wimbledon and Snoopy's Tournament Tips, introduction by Billie Jean King, 1979.

And a Woodstock in a Birch Tree, 1979.

Here Comes the April Fool!, 1980.

Things I Learned after It Was Too Late (and Other Minor Truths), 1981.

Dr. Beagle and Mr. Hyde 1981.

You're Weird, Sir!, 1982.

Classroom Peanuts, 1982.

Kiss Her, You Blockhead!, 1983.

And the Beagles and the Bunnies Shall Lie Down Together: The Theology in Peanuts, 1984.

Things I've Had to Learn Over and Over and Over: (Plus a Few Minor Discoveries), 1984.

I'm Not Your Sweet Babboo!, 1984.

Big League Peanuts, 1985.

The Way of the Fussbudget Is Not Easy, 1986.

Don't Hassle Me with Your Sighs, Chuck, 1993.

Duck, Here Comes Another Day!, 1994.

Snoopy's Love Book, 1994.

The Cheshire Beagle, 1994.

Nothing Echoes Like an Empty Mailbox, 1995.

Sarcasm Does Not Become You, Ma'am, 1995.

I Heard a D Minus Call Me, 1995.

Also author of A Kiss on the Nose Turns Anger Aside, The Mad Punter Strikes Again, Thank Goodness for People, What Makes Musicians So Sarcastic?,What Makes You Think You're So Happy?, and Fly, You Stupid Kite, Fly.

PUBLISHED BY FAWCETT (NEW YORK, NY)

Good Ol' Snoopy (contains selections from Snoopy), 1958.

Wonderful World of Peanuts (contains selections from More Peanuts), 1963.

Hey, Peanuts! (contains selections from More Peanuts), 1963.

Good Grief, Charlie Brown! (contains selections from Good Grief, More Peanuts!), 1963.

For the Love of Peanuts (contains selections from Good Grief, More Peanuts!), 1963.

Fun with Peanuts (contains selections from Good Ol' Charlie Brown), 1964.

Here Comes Charlie Brown (contains selections from Good Ol' Charlie Brown), 1964.

Very Funny, Charlie Brown! (contains selections from You're Out of Your Mind, Charlie Brown!), 1965.

What Next, Charlie Brown? (contains selections from You're Out of Your Mind, Charlie Brown!), 1965.

Here Comes Snoopy (contains selections from Snoopy), 1966.

We're On Your Side, Charlie Brown (contains selections from But We Love You, Charlie Brown), 1966.

You Are Too Much, Charlie Brown (contains selections from But We Love You, Charlie Brown), 1966.

You're a Winner, Charlie Brown (contains selections from Go Fly a Kite, Charlie Brown), 1967.

Let's Face It, Charlie Brown (contains selections from Go Fly a Kite, Charlie Brown), 1967.

Who Do You Think You Are, Charlie Brown? (contains selections from Peanuts Every Sunday), 1968.

You're My Hero, Charlie Brown (contains selections from Peanuts Every Sunday), 1968.

This Is Your Life, Charlie Brown (contains selections from It's a Dog's Life, Charlie Brown), 1968.

Slide, Charlie Brown, Slide (contains selections from It's a Dog's Life, Charlie Brown), 1968.

All This and Snoopy, Too (contains selections from You Can't Win, Charlie Brown), 1969.

Here's to You, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You Can't Win, Charlie Brown), 1969.

Nobody's Perfect, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You Can Do It, Charlie Brown), 1969.

You're a Brave Man, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You Can Do It, Charlie Brown), 1969.

Peanuts for Everybody (contains selections from We're Right behind You, Charlie Brown), 1970.

You've Done It Again, Charlie Brown (contains selections from We're Right behind You, Charlie Brown), 1970.

We Love You, Snoopy (contains selections from Snoopy, Come Home), 1970.

It's for You, Snoopy (contains selections from Sunday's Fun Day, Charlie Brown), 1971.

Have It Your Way, Charlie Brown (contains selections from Sunday's Fun Day, Charlie Brown), 1971.

You're Not for Real, Snoopy (contains selections from You Need Help, Charlie Brown), 1971.

You're a Pal, Snoopy (contains selections from You Need Help, Charlie Brown), 1972.

What Now, Charlie Brown? (contains selections from The Unsinkable Charlie Brown), 1972.

You're Something Special, Snoopy! (contains selections from The Unsinkable Charlie Brown), 1972.

You've Got a Friend, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You'll Flip, Charlie Brown), 1972.

Who Was That Dog I Saw You With, Charlie Brown? (contains selections from You're You, Charlie Brown), 1973.

There's No One Like You, Snoopy (contains selections from You're You, Charlie Brown), 1973.

It's All Yours, Snoopy (contains selections from You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown), 1975.

Peanuts Double, Volume I, 1976, Volume II, 1978.

Watch out, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You're Out of Sight, Charlie Brown), 1977.

You've Got to Be You, Snoopy (contains selections from You've Come a Long Way, Charlie Brown), 1978.

You're on Your Own, Snoopy (contains selections from "Ha Ha, Herman," Charlie Brown), 1978.

You Can't Win Them All, Charlie Brown (contains selections from "Ha Ha, Herman," Charlie Brown), 1978.

It's Your Turn, Snoopy (contains selections from You're the Guest of Honor, Charlie Brown), 1978.

You Asked for It, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You're the Guest of Honor, Charlie Brown), 1978.

It's Show Time, Snoopy (contains selections from Speak Softly, and Carry a Beagle), 1978.

You've Got to Be Kidding, Snoopy, 1978.

They're Playing Your Song, Charlie Brown, 1978.

You're So Smart, Snoopy (contains selections from You're Out of Sight, Charlie Brown), 1978.

Charlie Brown and Snoopy (contains selections from As You Like It, Charlie Brown), 1978.

You're the Greatest, Charlie Brown (contains selections from As You Like It, Charlie Brown), 1978.

Try It Again, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You're Something Else, Charlie Brown), 1978.

Your Choice, Snoopy (contains selections from You're Something Else, Charlie Brown), 1978.

Take It Easy, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You'll Flip, Charlie Brown), 1978.

You've Got It Made, Snoopy (contains selections from You've Had It, Charlie Brown), 1978.

Don't Give Up, Charlie Brown (contains selections from You've Had It, Charlie Brown), 1978.

That's Life, Snoopy (contains selections from Thompson Is in Trouble, Charlie Brown), 1978.

You've Come a Long Way, Snoopy (contains selections from Thompson Is in Trouble, Charlie Brown), 1979.

Play Ball, Snoopy (contains selections from Win a Few, Lose a Few, Charlie Brown), 1979.

Let's Hear It for Dinner, Snoopy, 1979.

Keep Up the Good Work, Charlie Brown, 1979.

Think Thinner, Snoopy, 1979.

Stay with It, Snoopy (contains selections from Summers Fly, Winters Walk, Volume III), 1980.

Sing for Your Supper, Snoopy, 1981.

Snoopy, Top Dog (contains selections from The Beagle Has Landed), 1981.

You're Our Kind of Dog, Snoopy (contains selections from And a Woodstock in a Birch Tree), 1981.

Also author of Love and Kisses, Snoopy.

"SNOOPY'S FACTS AND FUN BOOK" SERIES

Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Boats, Random House (New York, NY), 1979.

Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Houses, Random House (New York, NY), 1979.

Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Planes, Random House (New York, NY), 1979.

Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Seasons, Random House (New York, NY), 1979.

Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Farms, Random House (New York, NY), 1980.

Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Nature, Random House (New York, NY), 1980.

Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Seashores, Random House (New York, NY), 1980.

Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Trucks, Random House (New York, NY), 1980.

OTHER

Peanuts Project Book, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1963.

(With Kenneth F. Hall) Two-by-Fours: A Sort of Serious Book about Small Children, Warner Press (Anderson, IN), 1965.

(Contributor) Jeffrey H. Loria and others, What's It All about, Charlie Brown?: Peanuts Kids Look at America Today, Holt (New York, NY), 1968.

(Contributor) Robert L. Short, The Parables of Peanuts, Harper (New York, NY), 1968.

(With Lee Mendelson) Charlie Brown and Charlie Schulz: In Celebration of the Twentieth Anniversary of Peanuts, World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1970.

(Author of foreword) Morrie Turner, Nipper, Westminster (Philadelphia, PA), 1970.

(With Kathryn Wentzel Lumley) Snoopy's Secret Code Book (spelling and pronunciation guide), Holt (New York, NY), 1971.

The Charlie Brown Dictionary, Random House (New York, NY), 1973.

Peanuts Jubilee: My Life and Art with Charlie Brown and Others, Holt (New York, NY), 1975.

Charlie Brown's Super Book of Things to Do and Collect: Based on the Charles M. Schulz Characters, Random House (New York, NY), 1975.

Charlie Brown's Super Book of Questions and Answers about All Kinds of Animals from Snails to People!, Random House (New York, NY), 1976.

Charlie Brown's Second Super Book of Questions and Answers: About the Earth and Space from Plants to Planets!, Random House (New York, NY), 1977.

Charlie Brown's Third Super Book of Questions and Answers: About All Kinds of Boats and Planes, Cars and Trains, and Other Things That Move!, Random House (New York, NY), 1978.

Charlie Brown's Fourth Super Book of Questions and Answers: About All Kinds of People and How They Live!, Random House (New York, NY), 1979.

(With Lee Mendelson) Happy Birthday, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1979.

(With R. Smith Kiliper) Charlie Brown, Snoopy and Me: And All the Other Peanuts Characters, Doubleday (Garden City, NY), 1980.

Charlie Brown's Fifth Super Book of Questions and Answers: About All Kinds of Things and How They Work!, Random House (New York, NY), 1981.

Someday You'll Find Her, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1982.

It's Magic, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1982.

Charlie Brown's Encyclopedia of Energy: Based on the Charles M. Schulz Characters: Where We've Been, Where We're Going, and How We're Getting There, Random House (New York, NY), 1982.

Is This Good-Bye, Charlie Brown?, Random House (New York, NY), 1984.

Snoopy's Getting Married, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1986.

Happy New Year, Charlie Brown, Random House (New York, NY), 1986.

Dogs Don't Eat Dessert, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1987.

You're on the Wrong Foot Again, Charlie Brown, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1987.

By Supper Possessed, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Sally, School Is My World, Sparkler Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Talk Is Cheep, Charlie Brown, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Snoopy, My Greatest Adventures, Sparkler Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Schroeder, Music Is My Life, Sparkler Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Get in Shape, Snoopy!, Western Pub. Co. (Racine, WI), 1989.

I Take My Religion Seriously, Warner Press (Anderson, IN), 1989.

It Doesn't Take Much to Attract a Crowd, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1989.

Brothers and Sisters, It's All Relative: A Peanuts Book, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1989.

Snoopy around the World, photographs by Alberto Rizzo, H.N. Abrams (New York, NY), 1990.

Why, Charlie Brown, Why?: A Story about What Happens When a Friend Is Very Ill, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1990.

An Educated Slice: Starring Snoopy As the World Famous Golfer, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1990.

Don't Be Sad, Flying Ace, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1990.

You're a Star, Snoopy!, Western Publishing (Racine, WI), 1990.

Could You Be More Pacific?, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1991.

Dr. Snoopy's Advice to Pet Owners, illustrations by Charles M. Schulz, Andrews & McMeel (Kansas City, MO), 1993.

Mischief on Daisy Hill: Featuring the Daisy Hill Puppies, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1993.

Creatures, Large and Small, Derrydale Books (New York, NY), 1994.

The Cheshire Beagle, Holt (New York, NY), 1994.

Around the World in 45 Years: Charlie Brown's Anniversary Celebration, Andrews & McMeel (Kansas City, MO), 1994.

Land and Space, Derrydale Books (New York, NY), 1994.

Being a Dog Is a Full-Time Job: A Peanuts Collection, Andrews & McMeel (Kansas City, MO), 1994.

People and Customs of the World, Derrydale Books (New York, NY), 1994.

Make Way for the King of the Jungle: A Peanuts Collection, Andrews & McMeel (Kansas City, MO), 1995.

Pop! Goes the Beagle, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1996.

Life's Answers (and Much, Much More), Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Bah, Humbug!, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Snoopy's Christmas Tree, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1996.

Your Dog Plays Hockey?, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1996.

Friends for Life, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Way beyond Therapy, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Trick or Treat, Great Pumpkin, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1996.

Kick the Ball, Marcie!, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1996.

Love Isn't Easy, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Dogs Are from Jupiter, Cats Are from the Moon, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Happy Birthday! (And One to Glow On), Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

It's Christmas!, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Somebody Loves You, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Me, Stressed Out?, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

I Love You!, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Season's Greetings!, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

See You Later, Litigator!, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Birthdays Are No Piece of Cake, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Snoopy, Not Your Average Dog, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

You Can Count on Me, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

'Tis the Season to Be Crabby, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Have Another Cookie (It'll Make You Feel Better), Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Sally's Christmas Miracle, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1996.

A Good Caddie Is Hard to Find, Collins Publishers (San Francisco, CA), 1996.

Happy Valentine's Day, Sweet Babboo!, HarperFestival (New York, NY), 1997.

Insights from the Outfield, Collins (New York, NY), 1997.

Born Crabby, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1997.

Life Is Like a Ten-Speed Bicycle, Collins (New York, NY), 1997.

You're Divine, Valentine!, Collins (New York, NY), 1997.

Charlie Brown: Not Your Average Blockhead, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1997.

Love Is in the Air, Collins (New York, NY), 1997.

Lucy, Not Just Another Pretty Face, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Happy New Year!, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Have Fun at Beanbag Camp!, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Aaugh! A Dog Ate My Book Report, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1998.

I've Been Traded for Pizza?, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Beware of the Snoring Ghost!, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1998.

Bon Voyage!, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1998.

My Best Friend, My Blanket, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Punt, Pass, and Peanuts, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

The Round-Headed Kid and Me, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Travels with My Cactus, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

The Doctor Is In(sane), HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Everyone Gets Gold Stars but Me!, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1998.

Our Lines Must Be Crossed!, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

You're Our New Mascot, Chuck!, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1998.

You're the Tops, Pops!, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1998.

Leaf It to Sally Brown, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Lighten Up, It's Christmas!, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Sally's Christmas Play, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

You Have a Brother Named Spike?, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1998.

A Flying Ace Needs Lots of Root Beer, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1998.

Calling All Cookies!, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1999.

Dogs Are Worth It!, HarperPerennial (New York, NY), 1999.

Good Grief! Gardening Is Hard Work!, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1999.

I Told You So, You Blockhead, HarperPerennial (New York, NY), 1999.

Shall We Dance, Charlie Brown?, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1999.

It's Baseball Season, Again!, HarperHorizon (New York, NY), 1999.

Now That's Profound, Charlie Brown, HarperPerennial (New York, NY), 1999.

Peanuts: A Golden Celebration: The Art and the Story of the World's Best-Loved Comic Strip, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1999.

The World Is Filled with Mondays, HarperPerennial (New York, NY), 1999.

Peanuts 2000, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2000.

It's a Big World, Charlie Brown, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2001.

It's a Dog's Life, Snoopy, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2001.

A Peanuts Christmas, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2002.

A Peanuts Valentine, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2003.

TELEPLAYS

A Charlie Brown Christmas, CBS-TV, December 9, 1965.

Charlie Brown's All-Stars, CBS-TV, June 8, 1966.

It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, October 27, 1966.

You're in Love, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, June 12, 1967.

He's Your Dog, Charlie Brown!, CBS-TV, February 14, 1968.

It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, September 27, 1969.

Play It Again, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, March 28, 1971.

It's the Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, 1972.

You're Elected, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, October 29, 1972.

There's No Time for Love, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, March 11, 1973.

Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, January, 1976.

It's Arbor Day, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, March 16, 1976.

It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, 1978.

Life Is a Circus, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, 1981.

She's a Good Skate, Charlie Brown, CBS-TV, 1981.

Also writer of screenplays for feature-length animated films, A Boy Named Charlie Brown, National General Pictures, 1969,Snoopy, Come Home, National General Pictures, 1972, and Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown, and Don't Come Back!, Paramount, 1980.

ILLUSTRATOR

Art Linkletter, Kids Say the Darndest Things, Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1957.

Art Linkletter, Kids Still Say the Darndest Things, Geis (New York, NY), 1961.

Bill Adler, compiler, Dear President Johnson, Morrow (New York, NY), 1964.

Fritz Ridenour, editor, I'm a Good Man, But …, Regal Books (Glendale, CA), 1969.

June Dutton, Peanuts Cookbook, Determined Productions (San Francisco, Ca), 1969.

June Dutton, Peanuts Lunch Bag Cookbook, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1970.

All I Want for Christmas Is …: Open Letters to Santa, Hallmark (Kansas City, MO), 1972.

Evelyn Shaw, The Snoopy Doghouse Cook Book, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1979.

Tubby Book Featuring Snoopy, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1980.

Monica Bayley, The Snoopy Omnibus of Fun Facts from the Snoopy Fun Fact Calendars, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1982.

J.C. Suares, editor and designer, The Snoopy Collection, introduction by Nancy Smart, photographs by Don Hamerman, Stewart, Tabori & Chang (New York, NY), 1982.

June Dutton, Snoopy and the Gang out West, Determined Productions (San Francisco, CA), 1982.

Nancy Hall, Snoopy's ABC's, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Nancy Hall, Snoopy's Book of Shapes, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Nancy Hall, Snoopy's 1, 2, 3, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Harry Coe Verr, Let's Fly a Kite, Charlie Brown!: A Book about the Seasons, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Justine Korman, Snoopy's A Little Help from My Friend, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Nancy Hall, Snoopy's Book of Colors, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Nancy Hall, Snoopy's Book of Opposites, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Norman Simone, Come Back, Snoopy, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Abraham J. Twerski, When Do the Good Things Start?, Topper Books, 1988.

Margo Lundell, Where's Woodstock?, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Justine Korman, It's How You Play the Game, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Marci McGill, Snoopy, the World's Greatest Author, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Justine Korman, Snoopy's Two-Minute Stories, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Western Publishing (Racine, WI), 1988.

Margo Lundell, Charlie Brown's Two Minute Stories, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Western Publishing (Racine, WI), 1988.

Diane Namm, A Charlie Brown Christmas, background illustrations by Art and Kim Ellis, Golden Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Robert L. Short, Short Meditations on the Bible and Peanuts, Westminster/John Knox Press (Louisville, KY), 1990.

Abraham J. Twerski, Waking Up Just in Time: A Therapist Shows How to Use the Twelve-Steps Approach to Life's Ups and Downs, Topper Books (New York, NY), 1990.

Abraham J. Twerski, I Didn't Ask to Be in This Family: Sibling Relationships and How They Shape Adult Behavior and Relationships, Holt (New York, NY), 1996.

ADAPTATIONS: The following titles were based on the "Peanuts" comic strip by Shulz, and were published by Little Simon (New York, NY): Friends Forever, Snoopy, adapted by Tricia Boczkowski, 2001; Kick the Football, Charlie Brown, adapted by Judy Katschke, 2001; A Charlie Brown Valentine, adapted by Justine and Ron Fontes, art adapted by Paige Braddock, 2001; It's Time for School, Charlie Brown, adapted by Judy Katschke, art adapted by Nick LoBianco, 2002; A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving, adapted by Justine and Ron Fontes, art adapted by Tom Brannon, 2002; Lucy's Advice, adapted by Nancy Krulik, art adapted by Peter LoBianco, 2003; Puppy Days, adapted by Lizzie Mack, art adapted by Tom Brannon, 2003.

SIDELIGHTS: Charles M. Schulz, the world-renowned creator of the "Peanuts" comic strip, loved his job. During his lifetime, he maintained that all he "really ever wanted was to be a cartoonist." When the "Peanuts" comic strip began in 1950, Schulz had no idea the phenomenon it would become. A great admirer of Roy Crane, George Herriman, Al Capp, and Milt Caniff in his youth, he had a hard time selling his own comic strip at first; United Feature Syndicate finally bought it in 1950 and named it "Peanuts." Schulz, who wanted to name the strip "Li'l Folks," never really liked the title. "Peanuts" started in just eight newspapers and gradually grew. At the time of his death in 2000, Schulz's comic strip was read by more than 335 million people everyday. It appeared in 2,600 newspapers and 75 countries. Reprints of the comic strip still appear in newspapers today.

Schulz named his Charlie Brown character after a friend at Art Instruction Schools named Charles Frances Brown. Charlie Brown's dog, Snoopy, was modeled after Schulz's own childhood pet, Spike. Many of the other characters in the strip were also based on friends and acquaintances of Schulz. The popularity of the strip is often credited to its ability to relate to almost anyone. "Charlie Brown was the quintessence of ordinariness," reported the Encyclopedia of World Biography.

Lee Mendelson pointed out in his biography of Schulz, "Charlie Brown has become the symbol of mid-century America … because [he is] a basic reflection of his time," the "Mr. Anxious" of the age. Richard R. Lingeman wrote in the New York Times that the "Peanuts" children "precociously know that life can be lousy and their popularity from the late fifties on may be due to their reflecting a secret, self-doubting, self-questioning mood abroad in the nation: Charlie Brown is everybody's loser because everybody is a loser much of the time. "Peanuts" offers a gentle philosophy of human relations, of stoically coping with existence, that is the underside of the preachments of those eupeptic middle-class yeasayers from Norman Vincent Peale to How to Be Your Own Best Friend." Commenting on the universality of the appeal of Charlie Brown, the perpetual loser, Schulz said in Peanuts Jubilee: My Life and Art with Charlie Brown and Others, "Readers are generally sympathetic toward a lead character who is rather gentle, sometimes put upon, and not always the brightest person. Perhaps this is the kind of person who is easiest to love. Charlie Brown has to be the one who suffers because he is a caricature of the average person. Most of us are much more acquainted with losing than we are with winning. Winning is great, but it isn't funny."

Newsmakers 2000 noted, "'Peanuts' opened a new chapter in comics for its focus on the insecurities that everyone faces in life." Unlike many cartoonists, Schulz did all of the work on the comic strip by himself, often drawing material for the strip from his own childhood memories and from his experiences in raising five children. According to Contemporary Heroes and Heroines, "His own youthful disappointments in love, athletics, and school" became part of his comic strip. His personal touch set it apart from other comic strips. Schulz was the only cartoonist ever to have won the Reuben Award (the cartoonist's equivalent of the Oscar, designed by and named after Rube Goldberg) twice, in 1955 and again in 1964.

The popularity of the strip "cuts across every kind of classification for all kinds of special reasons," wrote John Tebbel in a Saturday Review article titled "The Not-So-Peanuts World of Charles M. Shulz." Tebbel continued, "Schroeder, the Beethoven-loving character who is usually seen playing the piano when he isn't playing baseball, appeals to people who had never heard of Beethoven before. The little tyrant Lucy is seen by the small fry as a deliciously contrary girl…. Linus, with his security blanket, seems to speak to everyone who would like to have a blanket of his own in troubled times. And Snoopy, the beagle who has Van Goghs hanging in his doghouse and a World War I aviator's helmet on his head, is the kind of fantasy dog everyone would like to own." Nonetheless, Schulz contended that there really was no specific "philosophy" behind the strip, and that his "chief purpose" was "to get the strips done in time to get down to the post office" before it closed.

The "Peanuts" comic strip developed well beyond the pages of the newspaper. In 1965, Schulz introduced the lovable characters to television, and during his lifetime, wrote many memorable animated shows about Charlie Brown and his pals, including classic favorites such as A Charlie Brown Christmas and It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown. He also wrote several feature-length animated films about the "Peanuts." But, the "Peanuts" industry does not stop there. "Peanuts" characters adorn T-shirts, lunchboxes, stationery, furniture, and much more. The "Peanuts" cartoon propelled Schulz to fame, and spawned books and documentaries about the cartoonist. Broadway and Off-Broadway musicals were created based on "Peanuts" characters.

Even the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has shown its love for the "Peanuts" cartoon. Snoopy made international history as the official name of the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) of the Apollo 10 manned flight to the moon in 1969. Great Pumpkin sightings are reported almost as often as UFO's, and Schroeder and his toy piano have been immortalized in the stained glass window of the Westminster Presbyterian Church in Buffalo, New York, along with Bach, Martin Luther, Duke Ellington, and Dr. Albert Schweitzer. Through his "Peanuts" cartoon, and Charlie Brown's "everyman" appeal, Schulz touched many lives. "The reader knew [Charlie Brown], knew his fears, sympathized with his sense of inferiority and alienation," noted the Charles M. Schulz Museum Web site.

The award-winning cartoonist laid down his crow-quill pen and announced his retirement on December 14, 1999, after suffering a stroke and a battle with colon cancer. According to the Charles M. Schulz Museum Web site, Schulz said, "I never dreamed that this would happen to me." In the months following his retirement, his office was flooded with letters from fans, lauding the cartoonist for his work. "Charles Schulz has shown us that a comic strip can transcend its small space on the page. It can uplift; it can challenge; it can educate its readers even as it entertains us," said President Bill Clinton in a farewell to Schulz.

Schulz would not live to see his last original Sunday cartoon in print, set to run on February 13, 2000. Schulz passed away in his sleep on February 12, 2000. The Charles M. Schulz Museum Web site noted, "As soon as he ceased to be a cartoonist, he ceased to be."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

BOOKS

Berger, Arthur Asa, The Comic-Stripped American, Walker (New York, NY), 1973.

Contemporary Heroes and Heroines, Book IV, Thomson Gale (Detroit, MI), 2000.

Contemporary Literary Criticism, Volume 12, Thomson Gale (Detroit, MI), 1980.

Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd edition, Thomson Gale (Detroit, MI), 1998.

Gross, Theodore L., editor, Representative Men, Free Press, 1970.

Johnson, Rheta Grimsley, Good Grief: The Story of Charles M. Schulz, Pharos Books (New York, NY), 1989.

Kidd, Chip, editor, Peanuts: The Art of Charles M. Schulz, Pantheon (New York, NY), 2001.

Mascola, Marilyn, Charles Schulz, Great Cartoonist, Rourke Enterprises (Vero Beach, FL), 1989.

Mendelson, Lee, A Charlie Brown Christmas: The Making of a Tradition, HarperResource (New York, NY), 2000.

Mendelson, Lee, and Charles Schulz, Charlie Brown and Charlie Schulz: In Celebration of the Twentieth Anniversary of Peanuts, World Publishing (Cleveland, OH), 1970.

Newsmakers 2000, Issue 3, Thomson Gale (Detroit, MI), 2000.

Reitberger, Reinhold, and Wolfgang Fuchs, Comics: Anatomy of a Mass Medium, translated by Nadia Fowler, Studio Vista (London, England), 1972.

Richards, Carmen, Minnesota Writers, Denison (Minneapolis, MN), 1961.

Schulz, Charles M., Around the World in 45 Years: Charlie Brown's Anniversary Celebration, Andrews & McMeel (Kansas City, MO), 1994.

Schulz, Charles M., I Take My Religion Seriously, Warner Press (Anderson, IN), 1989.

Schulz, Charles M., Peanuts Jubilee: My Life and Art with Charlie Brown and Others, Holt (New York, NY), 1975.

Schulz, Charles M., Peanuts Treasury, foreword by Johnny Hart, Holt (New York, NY), 1968.

Schulz, Charles M., Snoopy around the World, photographs by Alberto Rizzo, Abrams (New York, NY), 1990.

Schulz, Charles M., Things I've Had to Learn Over and Over and Over: (Plus a Few Minor Discoveries), Holt, Rinehart, & Winston (New York, NY), 1984.

Schulz, Charles M., You Don't Look 35, Charlie Brown!, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston (New York, NY), 1985.

Schulz, Monte, and Jody Millward, The Peanuts Trivia and Reference Book, Holt (New York, NY), 1986.

Short, Robert L., The Gospel according to Peanuts, John Knox (Louisville, KY), 1965.

Short, Robert L., The Parables of Peanuts, Harper (New York, NY), 1968.

Trimboli, Giovanni, editor, Charles M. Schulz: Forty Years Life and Art, preface by Umberto Eco, Pharos Books (New York, NY), 1990.

PERIODICALS

Appraisal, spring, 1982, review of Charlie Brown's Fifth Super Book of Questions and Answers, p. 62; spring, 1983, review of Charlie Brown's Encyclopedia of Energy, p. 47.

Art in America, March-April, 1976.

Booklist, November 1, 1974; February 1, 1983, reviews of Charlie Brown's Super Book of Questions and Answers, Charlie Brown's Second Super Book of Questions and Answers, Charlie Brown's Third Super Book of Questions and Answers, and Charlie Brown's Fourth Super Book of Questions and Answers, p. 740, and review of Charlie Brown's Fifth Super Book of Questions and Answers, p. 741; September 1, 1983, review of Charlie Brown Dictionary, p. 97; December 15, 1985, review of You Don't Look 35, Charlie Brown!, p. 603; January 15, 1990, review of Charlie Brown Dictionary, p. 1034; April 15, 1999, review of Why, Charlie Brown, Why?, p. 1625; December 15, 1999, review of Peanuts: A Golden Celebration, p. 750.

Books for Keeps, September, 1991, review of Why, Charlie Brown, Why?, p. 11.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, December, 1982, review of Charlie Brown's Encyclopedia of Energy, p. 76.

Business World, December 20, 1969.

Christian Science Monitor, November 29, 1968; November 11, 1970.

Curriculum Review, October, 1983, review of Charlie Brown's Encyclopedia of Energy, p. 76.

Detroit Free Press, February 14, 2000, p. A1; October 14, 2001, review of It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, p. 5E.

Globe and Mail, December 18, 1999, review of Peanuts: A Golden Celebration, p. D15; November 24, 2001, review of Peanuts: The Art of Charles Schulz, p. D34.

Journal of Youth Services in Libraries, fall, 1987, review of Is This Good-Bye, Charlie Brown?, p. 72.

Junior Bookshelf, October, 1991, review of Why, Charlie Brown, Why?, p. 219.

Kliatt, spring, 1983, review of It's Chow Time, Snoopy, p. 54; winter, 1983, review of You're Weird, Sir!, p. 80; fall, 1984, review of And the Beagles and the Bunnies Shall Lie Down Together, p. 54; winter, 1985, review of I'm Not Your Sweet Babboo!, p. 77; fall, 1986, review of The Way of the Fussbudget Is Not Easy, p. 77; winter, 1986, review of You Don't Look 35, Charlie Brown!, p. 72; January, 1989, review of Talk Is Cheep, Charlie Brown, p. 61; April, 1989, review of Brothers and Sisters: It's All Relative, p. 66; January, 1990, review of Things I've Had to Learn Over and Over and Over, p. 49, and review of It Doesn't Take Much to At tract a Crowd, p. 49; April, 1990, review of If Beagles Could Fly, p. 52; September, 1990, review of An Educational Slice, p. 53; September, 1991, review of Could You Be More Pacific?, p. 66.

Learning: The Magazine for Creative Teaching, April, 1990, review of Why, Charlie Brown, Why?, p. 76.

Life, March 17, 1967.

Look, July 22, 1958.

Los Angeles Times Book Review, October 20, 1996, review of Trick or Treat, Great Pumpkin, p. 8; February 3, 2002, review of Peanuts: The Art of Charles M. Schulz, p. 12.

New Republic, December 7, 1974.

Newsweek, March 6, 1961; December 27, 1971.

New Yorker, March 18, 1967.

New York Times, May 26, 1969; June 2, 1971.

New York Times Book Review, March 12, 1967; December 7, 1975; December 11, 1977; October 26, 1980.

New York Times Magazine, April 16, 1967.

Publishers Weekly, July 7, 1975; July 27, 1990, review of Snoopy around the World, p. 219; June 24, 1996, reviews of Your Dog Plays Hockey?, Kick the Ball, Marcie!, It's the First Day of School!, and I'll Be Home Soon, Snoopy, p. 62; September 30, 1996, review of Trick or Treat, Great Pumpkin, p. 86, review of Snoopy's Christmas Tree, p. 93, review of Sally's Christmas Miracle, p. 93; October 4, 1999, review of Peanuts: A Golden Celebration, p. 59; December 3, 2001, review of A Charlie Brown Valentine, p. 62.

Punch, February 7, 1968.

Redbook, December, 1967.

Reflections … The Wanderer Review of Literature, summer, 1986, review of Me and Charlie Brown, Volume 1, p. 24.

Saturday Evening Post, January 12, 1957; April 25, 1964.

Saturday Review, April 12, 1969.

School Library Journal, January, 1982, review of Charlie Brown's Fifth Super Book of Questions and Answers, p. 74; February, 1982, review of Dr. Beagle and Mr. Hyde, p. 72; March, 1983, review of Charlie Brown's Encyclopedia of Energy, p. 172; May, 1983, review of Someday You'll Find Her, Charlie Brown, p. 66; December, 1983, review of Snoopy on Wheels, p. 59; January, 1985, review of Is This Good-Bye, Charlie Brown?, p. 80; April, 1986, re-view of You Don't Look 35, Charlie Brown!, p. 109; February, 2002, review of It's a Big World, Charlie Brown, p. 157.

Science Books and Films, May, 1982, review of Charlie Brown's Fifth Super Book of Questions and Answers, p. 273; March, 1983, review of Charlie Brown's Encyclopedia of Energy, p. 207; March, 1985, review of Snoopy's Facts and Fun Book about Seasons, p. 215.

Seventeen, January, 1962.

Time, March 3, 1957; April 9, 1965; January 5, 1970.

Times Educational Supplement, December 14, 1984, review of Snoopy and the Twelve Days of Christmas, p. 24.

Times Literary Supplement, December 3, 1976.

U.S. Catholic, July, 1969.

Valuator, spring, 1969.

Village Voice, March 16, 1967.

Voice of Youth Advocates, February, 1982, review of Dr. Beagle and Mr. Hyde, p. 44; April, 1986, review of You Don't Look 35, Charlie Brown!, p. 54.

Wall Street Journal, October 21, 1999, review of Peanuts: A Golden Celebration, p. W8.

Washington Post, April 4, 1970.

Washington Post Book World, September 16, 1979; March 24, 2002, review of Peanuts: The Art of Charles M. Schulz, p. 9.

ONLINE

Charles M. Shulz Museum Web site, http://www.charlesmschulzmuseum.org/ (June 2, 2003), biography of Charles M. Schulz.

Minnesota Author Biographies Project Web site, http://people.mnhs.org/authors/ (June 2, 2003), "Charles M. Schulz."

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