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Carus-Wilson, Eleanora Mary (1897–1977)

Carus-Wilson, Eleanora Mary (1897–1977)

English medieval economic historian. Born Eleanora Mary Carus-Wilson on December 27, 1897, in Montreal,Canada; died in 1977; daughter of Mary L.G. (Petrie) Carus-Wilson and Ashley Carus-Wilson (professor of electrical engineering at McGill University, Montreal); attended St. Paul's Girls' School; Westfield College, London, B.A., 1921, M.A., 1926.

Eleanora Carus-Wilson began her impressive academic career at her alma mater, London's Westfield College, where she was a part-time lecturer and did research under Eileen Power . During the war years, 1939–1945, she worked in the Ministry of Food, after which she joined the London School of Economics, becoming a professor of economic history in 1948. From 1953 to 1965, Carus-Wilson was at London University, where she carried out a major study in medieval trade. From 1964 to 1965, she was a Ford's lecturer in English history at Oxford.

Carus-Wilson's publications include England's Export Trade 1275–1547 (1963), written in collaboration with her pupil, Olive Coleman . She also contributed a chapter on the cloth industry to Cambridge Economic History of Europe (Vol. II, 1952) and authored a controversial article titled "An Industrial Revolution of the Thirteenth Century" for the Economic History Review (Vol. XI, 1941). In addition to her academic duties, Carus-Wilson served as president of both the Economic History Society and the Society of Medieval Archaeology (1966–69). She was awarded an honorary LL.D. from Smith College in 1968 and became an honorary fellow, LSE, in 1969. She also served as a governor of Westfield College and as president of the Westfield College Association.

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