Kübler-Ross, Elisabeth (1926–2004)

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Kübler-Ross, Elisabeth (1926–2004)

Swiss psychiatrist and thanatologist. Born Elisabeth Kübler in Zurich, Switzerland, July 8, 1926; died Aug 24, 2004, in Scottsdale, Arizona; dau. of Ernest Kübler (businessman) and Emma (Villager) Kübler; University of Zurich Medical School, MD, 1957; m. Emanuel Ross, 1958 (div.); children: Kenneth; Barbara.

Pioneer in field of thanatology, whose groundbreaking work with dying patients transformed Western medicine's approach toward the terminally ill, affected public policy and scholarly research, and radically altered Western society's attitudes toward death and dying; moved to US (1958); worked as rotating intern at Community Hospital, Glen Cove, NY (1958–59); became US citizen (1961); was a research fellow at Manhattan State Hospital (1959–61), resident at Montefiore Hospital, the Bronx (1961–62) and fellow in psychiatry, Psychopathic Hospital, University of Colorado Medical School (1962–65); was an assistant professor in psychiatry, Billings Hospital, University of Chicago (1965–70); published On Death and Dying in which she identified the 5 "stages" of dying: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance (1969); served as medical director of Family Service and Mental Health Center of South Cook Co., Chicago Heights, IL (1970–73); was president and chair of board of Shanti Nilaya Growth and Health Center, Escondido, CA (1977–83); focused efforts on AIDS (1980s); moved to Virginia (1983), then Scottsdale, AZ (1994). Writings include Death: The Final Stages of Growth (1975), To Live Until We Say Goodbye (1978), Working It Through (1981), Living With Death and Dying (1981), Remember the Secret (1981), On Children and Death (1985), AIDS: The Ultimate Challenge (1988) and On Life After Death (1991).

See also Derek Gill, Quest: The Life of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross (Harper & Row, 1980); and Women in World History.

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Kübler-Ross, Elisabeth (1926–2004)

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