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roast

roast / rōst/ • v. [tr.] 1. cook (food, esp. meat) by prolonged exposure to heat in an oven or over a fire: she was going to roast a leg of lamb for Sunday dinner | [as adj.] (roasted) roasted chestnuts. ∎  [intr.] (of food) be cooked in such a way: she checked the meat roasting in the oven. ∎  process (a foodstuff, metal ore, etc.) by subjecting it to intense heat: coffee beans are roasted and ground. ∎  make (someone or something) very warm, esp. by exposure to the heat of the sun or a fire: the fire was hot enough to roast anyone who stood close to it. ∎  [intr.] become very hot: Jessica could feel her face begin to roast. 2. criticize or reprimand severely: if you waste his time he'll roast you. ∎  offer a mocking tribute to (someone) at a roast. • adj. (of food) having been cooked in an oven or over an open fire: a plate of cold roast beef. • n. 1. a cut of meat that has been roasted or that is intended for roasting: carving the Sunday roast. ∎  a dish or meal of roasted food. ∎  the process of roasting something, esp. coffee, or the result of this. ∎  a particular type of roasted coffee: continental roasts. ∎  an outdoor party at which meat, esp. of a particular type, is roasted: Harold put on a terrific pig roast. 2. a banquet to honor a person at which the honoree is subjected to good-natured ridicule.

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roast

roast Originally meant to cook meat over an open fire on a spit; now refers to cooking in an enclosed oven, and so is ‘dry heating’. With meat the juices evaporate on the surface, producing the Maillard complex characteristic of roasted meat.

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roast

roast XIII. — OF. rostir (mod. rôtir) — WGmc. *raustjan (Du. roosten, OHG. rōsten, G. rösten).

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roast

roastboast, coast, ghost, host, most, oast, post, roast, toast •backmost • headmost • leftmost •endmost • midmost • hindmost •rightmost • topmost • foremost •almost • northernmost • downmost •outmost • southernmost • upmost •utmost • rearmost • lowermost •undermost • innermost • uppermost •aftermost •centremost (US centermost) •westernmost • easternmost •bottommost • outermost • uttermost •nethermost • furthermost •lamp post • bedpost • gatepost •Freepost • impost • guidepost •milepost • signpost • doorpost •outpost • goalpost • newel post •fingerpost • sternpost

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