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ham1 / ham/ • n. 1. meat from the upper part of a pig's leg salted and dried or smoked: thin slices of ham | a honey-baked ham. 2. (hams) the backs of the thighs or the thighs and buttocks: he squatted down on his hams. ham2 • n. 1. an excessively theatrical actor: nobody gets to emote more than a ham on the witness stand. ∎  excessively theatrical acting. 2. inf. an amateur radio operator. • v. (hammed , ham·ming ) [intr.] inf. overact: he was hamming it up, doing all the voices and the effects.

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ham

ham The whole hind leg of the pig, removed from the carcass and cured; Hams cured or smoked in different ways have different flavours; some have protected geographical designation and sometimes the process is secret. A 100‐g portion is a rich source of protein, niacin, and vitamin B1; a good source of copper; a source of vitamin B2, iron, zinc, and selenium; contains 5 g of fat, of which 40% is saturated; supplies 120 kcal (500 kJ). See also bacon; gammon.

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Ham (in the Bible)

Ham, in the Bible, son of Noah. In biblical ethnography, Ham is the father of the nations Cush, Mizraim, Phut, and Canaan. In a story separate from the flood narrative, the legend related in the Book of Genesis and in the Qur'an suggests that Canaan was a son of Noah. The "Land of Ham" is a designation for Egypt in the Psalms. The Hamitic languages were named after this son of Noah.

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ham (food)

ham, hind leg of a hog above the hock joint, prepared for food by curing or smoking. Ham is one of the earliest of preserved meats; it is now a leading product of the meatpacking industry. The flavor and quality of ham depend on the age, condition, and feeding of the swine and on the smoke used in curing. The Westphalian hams of Germany are smoked with juniper brush; birchwood also is used in N Europe; hickory is favored in the United States. The delicate flavor of the relatively lean Smithfield hams of Virginia is attributed in part to the roots, acorns, and nuts upon which the hogs feed. The major consumers of ham are Denmark, Germany, and the United States.

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ham

ham hollow or bend of the knee OE.; thigh of a hog used for food XVII. OE. ham, hom = MLG. hamme, OHG. hamma (G. dial. hamm), rel. to synon. MLG. hame, OHG. hama, ON. hǫm, f. Gmc. *þam- be crooked.
Hence hamstring one of the tendons at the back of the knee. XVI; hence as vb. disable (as if) by cutting these XVII.

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Ham

Ham

According to Norwegian legend, Ham was a storm fiend in the shape of an eagle with black wings, sent by Helgi to engulf Frithjof as he sailed for the island of Yarl Angantyr. The story is told in the Saga of Grettir.

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ham

ham1 an excessively theatrical actor. The term (originally US, from the late 19th century) may be from the first syllable of amateur (compare with the US slang term hamfatter ‘inexpert performer’).

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Ham

Ham / ham/ (in the Bible) a son of Noah (Gen. 10:1), traditional ancestor of the Hamites.

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ham

ham2 ham-and-egger in the US, informal term for an ordinary, average man.

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ham

hamam, Amsterdam, Assam, Bram, cam, cham, cheongsam, clam, cram, dam, damn, drachm, dram, exam, femme, flam, gam, glam, gram, ham, jam, jamb, lam, lamb, mam, mesdames, Omar Khayyám, Pam, pram, pro-am, ram, Sam, scam, scram, sham, Siam, slam, Spam, swam, tam, tram, Vietnam, wham, yam •in memoriam • ad nauseam •iamb, Priam •grandam • Edam • goddam •quondam • Potsdam • cofferdam •Rotterdam • Oxfam • Birmingham •Abraham • logjam • CAD-CAM •minicam • Nicam •Eelam, Elam •flimflam • oriflamme • Suriname •ad personam • diazepam • tangram •ashram • telegram • milligram •epigram • centigram • dithyramb •program, programme •cardiogram • radiogram • echogram •mammogram •aerogramme (US aerogram) •microgram • dirham •electrocardiogram • ideogram •heliogram • diaphragm • diagram •parallelogram • kilogram • hologram •encephalogram • anagram •monogram • sonogram • kissogram •pentagram • cryptogram • photogram •tam-tam • wigwam • whim-wham

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Ham

HAM

HAM (Heb. הָם), biblical city in Transjordan where Chedorlaomer, king of Elam, and his allies defeated the Zuzim in their campaign against the rebellious Canaanite kings (Gen. 14:5). In this biblical reference, Ham appears between Ashteroth-Karnaim and Kiriathaim, both of which are located in Transjordan, and it has therefore been identified with Tel Ham, 4½ mi. (7 km.) south of Arbel (Irbid) in Gilead. The identification of Ham with a place of the same name in the list of Thutmose iii (no. 118) is doubtful. At Tel Ham three megalithic walls and pottery from the Early Canaanite period have been found but no remains from the Patriarchal (Middle Bronze) Age have been uncovered there so far.

bibliography:

Maisler (Mazar), in: Koveẓ ha-Ḥevrah la-Ḥakirat Ereẓ Yisrael va-Attikoteha, 4 (1945), 68; Bergman, in: jpos, 16 (1936), 237ff.; Glueck, Explorations, 1 (1951), 165f.; Aharoni, Land, index.

[Michael Avi-Yonah]

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Ham

HAM

HAM (Heb. חָם), one of the three sons of Noah. Although he is always placed between Shem and Japheth (Gen. 5:32; 6:10, et al.), he appears to have been the youngest of the three (9:24). The Bible relates how Ham observed Noah drunk and naked in his tent. He "saw his father's nakedness," implying in the biblical Hebrew a sexual act or even rape, i.e., sodomized him (cf. "see the nakedness" in Lev. 20:17, and see Sanh. 70a). In contrast, when he told his brothers of the incident, they at once covered Noah, doing so with the utmost delicacy (9:22–23). When Noah became aware of what had transpired, he cursed Canaan for his action: "Cursed be Canaan; the lowest of slaves to his brothers" (9:24–25). The reason for Noah cursing Canaan, and not Ham, is not clear. Actually "Ham the father of" in verses 18b and 22 seems to be a somewhat crude link between verses 18–19 and 20ff., in which Noah's sons are Shem, Japheth, and Canaan. Ugaritic epic poetry makes it clear that a son had the obligation to take special care of his drunken father, and not to disgrace him (cf. Isa. 51:17–18). Accordingly, the biblical depiction of Ham-Canaan's depravity is probably to be taken as an ethnic slur rather than as a reflection of Canaanite reality (see *Canaan, Curse of), a tendency continued in Jewish Midrash (see below). Ham had four sons, Cush, Mizraim, Put, and Canaan, who became the progenitors of numerous nations (Gen. 10:6–20). As the home of the most important nation descended from Ham, Egypt is poetically called "Ham" in one psalm whose date is controversial (Ps. 78:51), and "the land of Ham" in two late psalms (Ps. 105:23, 27; 106:22; cf. Genesis Apocryphon, 19:13). Egypt is apparently the nucleus of the Hamite genealogy, the others having been added because of geographical proximity or political ties.

[Max Wurmbrand /

S. David Sperling (2nd ed.)]

In the Aggadah

Ham's descendant (Cush) is black skinned as a punishment for Ham's having had sexual intercourse in the ark (Sanh. 108b). When Ham saw his drunken father exposed, he emasculated him, saying, "Adam had but two sons, and one slew the other; this man Noah has three sons, yet he desires to beget a fourth" (Gen. R. 36:5). Noah therefore cursed Canaan (Gen. 9:25), Ham's fourth son, since through this act he was deprived of a fourth son (Gen. R. 36:7). According to another opinion, Ham committed sodomy with his father (Sanh. 70a) and Noah cursed Canaan because Ham, together with his father and two brothers, had previously been blessed by God (Gen. R. loc. cit.). Another tradition attributes the curse to the fact that it was Canaan who castrated Noah. Ham was nevertheless to blame because he informed his brothers of their father's nakedness (pdre 23). Canaan was so wicked that his last will and testament to his children was: "Love one another, love robbery, love lewdness, hate your masters, and do not speak the truth" (Pes. 113b). Ham was also punished in that his descendants, the Egyptians and Ethiopians, were taken captive and led into exile with their buttocks uncovered (Isa. 20:4; Gen. R. 36:6). Ham was responsible for the ultimate transfer to Nimrod of the garments which God had made for Adam and Eve before their expulsion from the Garden of Eden. From Adam and Eve these garments went to Enoch, and from him to Methuselah, and finally to Noah, who took them into the ark with him. When the inmates of the ark were about to leave their refuge, Ham stole the garments and kept them concealed for many years. Finally, he passed them on to his firstborn son, Cush, who eventually gave them to his son, Nimrod, when he reached his 20th year (pdre 24; Sefer ha-Yashar, Noaḥ, 22).

[Aaron Rothkoff]

bibliography:

A. Reubeni, Shem, Ḥam ve-Yafet… (1932), 71–182; J. Skinner, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Genesis (1912), 181–7, 200–4: Jeremias, Alte Test; Maisler (Mazar), in: EretzIsrael, 3 (1954), 18–32; U. Cassuto, A Commentary on the Book of Genesis (1964); Ginzberg, Legends, 1 (1942), 166–73, 177; 5 (1947), 188–95. add. bibliography: N. Sarna, jps Torah Commentary Genesis (1989), 63–72; E. Isaac, in: abd, 3, 31–2.

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