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ham1 / ham/ • n. 1. meat from the upper part of a pig's leg salted and dried or smoked: thin slices of ham | a honey-baked ham. 2. (hams) the backs of the thighs or the thighs and buttocks: he squatted down on his hams. ham2 • n. 1. an excessively theatrical actor: nobody gets to emote more than a ham on the witness stand. ∎  excessively theatrical acting. 2. inf. an amateur radio operator. • v. (hammed , ham·ming ) [intr.] inf. overact: he was hamming it up, doing all the voices and the effects.

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ham

ham The whole hind leg of the pig, removed from the carcass and cured; Hams cured or smoked in different ways have different flavours; some have protected geographical designation and sometimes the process is secret. A 100‐g portion is a rich source of protein, niacin, and vitamin B1; a good source of copper; a source of vitamin B2, iron, zinc, and selenium; contains 5 g of fat, of which 40% is saturated; supplies 120 kcal (500 kJ). See also bacon; gammon.

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Ham (in the Bible)

Ham, in the Bible, son of Noah. In biblical ethnography, Ham is the father of the nations Cush, Mizraim, Phut, and Canaan. In a story separate from the flood narrative, the legend related in the Book of Genesis and in the Qur'an suggests that Canaan was a son of Noah. The "Land of Ham" is a designation for Egypt in the Psalms. The Hamitic languages were named after this son of Noah.

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ham (food)

ham, hind leg of a hog above the hock joint, prepared for food by curing or smoking. Ham is one of the earliest of preserved meats; it is now a leading product of the meatpacking industry. The flavor and quality of ham depend on the age, condition, and feeding of the swine and on the smoke used in curing. The Westphalian hams of Germany are smoked with juniper brush; birchwood also is used in N Europe; hickory is favored in the United States. The delicate flavor of the relatively lean Smithfield hams of Virginia is attributed in part to the roots, acorns, and nuts upon which the hogs feed. The major consumers of ham are Denmark, Germany, and the United States.

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ham

ham hollow or bend of the knee OE.; thigh of a hog used for food XVII. OE. ham, hom = MLG. hamme, OHG. hamma (G. dial. hamm), rel. to synon. MLG. hame, OHG. hama, ON. hǫm, f. Gmc. *þam- be crooked.
Hence hamstring one of the tendons at the back of the knee. XVI; hence as vb. disable (as if) by cutting these XVII.

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Ham

Ham

According to Norwegian legend, Ham was a storm fiend in the shape of an eagle with black wings, sent by Helgi to engulf Frithjof as he sailed for the island of Yarl Angantyr. The story is told in the Saga of Grettir.

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ham

ham1 an excessively theatrical actor. The term (originally US, from the late 19th century) may be from the first syllable of amateur (compare with the US slang term hamfatter ‘inexpert performer’).

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Ham

Ham / ham/ (in the Bible) a son of Noah (Gen. 10:1), traditional ancestor of the Hamites.

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ham

ham2 ham-and-egger in the US, informal term for an ordinary, average man.

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ham

hamam, Amsterdam, Assam, Bram, cam, cham, cheongsam, clam, cram, dam, damn, drachm, dram, exam, femme, flam, gam, glam, gram, ham, jam, jamb, lam, lamb, mam, mesdames, Omar Khayyám, Pam, pram, pro-am, ram, Sam, scam, scram, sham, Siam, slam, Spam, swam, tam, tram, Vietnam, wham, yam •in memoriam • ad nauseam •iamb, Priam •grandam • Edam • goddam •quondam • Potsdam • cofferdam •Rotterdam • Oxfam • Birmingham •Abraham • logjam • CAD-CAM •minicam • Nicam •Eelam, Elam •flimflam • oriflamme • Suriname •ad personam • diazepam • tangram •ashram • telegram • milligram •epigram • centigram • dithyramb •program, programme •cardiogram • radiogram • echogram •mammogram •aerogramme (US aerogram) •microgram • dirham •electrocardiogram • ideogram •heliogram • diaphragm • diagram •parallelogram • kilogram • hologram •encephalogram • anagram •monogram • sonogram • kissogram •pentagram • cryptogram • photogram •tam-tam • wigwam • whim-wham

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