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Black Caucus, Congressional

BLACK CAUCUS, CONGRESSIONAL

BLACK CAUCUS, CONGRESSIONAL (CBC), was formed in 1971 by African American members of the U.S. House of Representatives, with the specific aim of challenging President Richard Nixon's conservative civil rights and social welfare policies. Dominated through 2002 by liberal Democrats from inner-city districts, the CBC annually issued an "alternative budget" that called for increased domestic spending and military cuts. The Caucus lobbied for aid to Africa, sanctions against South Africa under its apartheid regime, as well as expansion of economic opportunities for African Americans. The CBC formed a nonprofit foundation in 1976 to carry out public policy research as well to hold conferences on issues related to the cause of black equality. In the early 2000s, the CBC was criticized for its lack of ideological diversity as well as its inability to work closely with moderate Democrats.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Singh, Robert. The Congressional Black Caucus: Racial Politics in the U.S. Congress. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 1988.

Richard M.Flanagan

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Congressional Black Caucus

Congressional Black Caucus, organization of African-American members of the U.S. House of Representatives. Founded in 1970, it addresses legislative concerns of African Americans and other minority citizens, such as employment, welfare reform, minority business development, and expanded educational opportunities. The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation (est. 1976) conducts research on issues affecting African Americans, publishes a yearly report on key legislation, and sponsors issue forums, leadership seminars, and scholarships.

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