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touchdown

touch·down / ˈtəchˌdoun/ • n. 1. the moment at which an aircraft's wheels or part of a spacecraft make contact with the ground during landing: two hours until touchdown. 2. Football a six-point score made by carrying or passing the ball into the end zone of the opposing side, or by recovering it there following a fumble or blocked kick. ∎  Rugby an act of touching the ground with the ball behind the opponents' goal line, scoring a try.

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touchdown

touchdownbrown, Browne, clown, crown, down, downtown, drown, frown, gown, low-down, noun, renown, run-down, town, upside-down, uptown •crackdown • clampdown • Ashdown •markdown • letdown • meltdown •breakdown, shakedown, takedown •kick-down • thistledown • sit-down •climbdown • countdown •Southdown •godown, hoedown, showdown, slowdown •put-down • touchdown • tumbledown •comedown •rundown, sundown •shutdown • eiderdown • nightgown •pronoun • Jamestown • Freetown •midtown • Bridgetown • Kingstown •shanty town • Georgetown • Motown •hometown • toytown • Newtown •Charlottetown • Chinatown

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Touchdown

Touchdown ★★½ 1931

College football coach Dan Curtis (Arlen) is a winatallcosts kind of guy, that is until one of players is seriously injured after Curtis pushes him too hard. Things come to a head when the team is set to play their archrival, and Curtis has to decide which is more important—his team or the win? m/B VHS . Richard Arlen, Peggy Shannon, Jack Oakie, Regis Toomey, George Barbier, J. Farrell MacDonald, George Irving; D: Norman Z. McLeod; W: Grover Jones, William Slavens McNutt.

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