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sphere

sphere / sfi(ə)r/ • n. 1. a round solid figure, or its surface, with every point on its surface equidistant from its center. ∎  an object having this shape; a ball or globe. ∎  a globe representing the earth. ∎ chiefly poetic/lit. a celestial body. ∎ poetic/lit. the sky perceived as a vault upon or in which celestial bodies are represented as lying. ∎  each of a series of revolving concentrically arranged spherical shells in which celestial bodies were formerly thought to be set in a fixed relationship. 2. an area of activity, interest, or expertise: his new wife's skill in the domestic sphere. ∎  a section of society or an aspect of life distinguished and unified by a particular characteristic: political reforms to match those in the economic sphere. • v. [tr.] archaic enclose in or as if in a sphere. ∎  form into a rounded or perfect whole. PHRASES: music (or harmony) of the spheres the natural harmonic tones supposedly produced by the movement of the celestial spheres or the bodies fixed in them. sphere of influence (or interest) a country or area in which another country has power to affect developments although it has no formal authority. ∎  a field or area in which an individual or organization has power to affect events and developments. DERIVATIVES: spher·al / -əl/ adj. ( archaic ).

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sphere

sphere, in geometry, the three-dimensional analogue of a circle. The term is applied to the spherical surface, every point of which is the same distance (the radius) from a certain fixed point (the center), and also to the volume enclosed by such a surface. The curve formed by a plane cutting a sphere is a circle. If the plane goes through the center of the sphere, the circle is called a great circle of the sphere. It is the largest circle that can be drawn upon the sphere, and all great circles of the same or equal spheres are of equal size. The shortest distance between two points on a spherical surface, measured on the surface, is the distance along the great circle through those points. A plane cutting a sphere in a great circle divides the sphere into two equal segments called hemispheres. The diameter of a sphere is the diameter of one of its great circles. The formula for the area of the surface of a sphere is S=4πr2, and for the volume it is V=4/3 πr3, where r is the radius of the sphere. Spherical geometry and spherical trigonometry are methods of determining magnitudes and figures on a spherical surface.

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sphere

sphere globular body or figure; globe conceived as appropriate to a particular planet, hence (one's or its) province or domain XVII. ME. sper(e) — OF. espere, later (with assim. to L.) sphère — late L. sphēra, earlier sphæra — Gr. sphaîra ball, globe.
So spheric, spherical XVI. — late L. sphē-, sphæricus — Gr. sphaîrikós. spheroid XVII.

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sphere

sphere Three-dimensional geometric figure formed by the locus in space of points equidistant from a given point (the centre). The distance from the centre to the surface is the radius, r. The volume is (4/3)πr3 and the surface area is 4πr2.

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Sphere

Sphere

the persons with whom one is normally in contact, 1839; a group of persons of a certain rank, standing, or interest, 1601.

Examples : sphere of sweet affections, 1602; of fortunes, 1671; of the theatre; of the world of music.

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sphere

sphereadhere, Agadir, appear, arrear, auctioneer, austere, balladeer, bandolier, Bashkir, beer, besmear, bier, blear, bombardier, brigadier, buccaneer, cameleer, career, cashier, cavalier, chandelier, charioteer, cheer, chevalier, chiffonier, clavier, clear, Coetzee, cohere, commandeer, conventioneer, Cordelier, corsetière, Crimea, dear, deer, diarrhoea (US diarrhea), domineer, Dorothea, drear, ear, electioneer, emir, endear, engineer, fear, fleer, Freer, fusilier, gadgeteer, Galatea, gazetteer, gear, gondolier, gonorrhoea (US gonorrhea), Greer, grenadier, hear, here, Hosea, idea, interfere, Izmir, jeer, Judaea, Kashmir, Keir, kir, Korea, Lear, leer, Maria, marketeer, Medea, Meir, Melilla, mere, Mia, Mir, mishear, mountaineer, muleteer, musketeer, mutineer, near, orienteer, pamphleteer, panacea, paneer, peer, persevere, pier, Pierre, pioneer, pistoleer, privateer, profiteer, puppeteer, queer, racketeer, ratafia, rear, revere, rhea, rocketeer, Sapir, scrutineer, sear, seer, sere, severe, Shamir, shear, sheer, sincere, smear, sneer, sonneteer, souvenir, spear, sphere, steer, stere, summiteer, Tangier, tear, tier, Trier, Tyr, veer, veneer, Vere, Vermeer, vizier, volunteer, Wear, weir, we're, year, Zaïre

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Sphere

Sphere ★½ 1997 (PG-13)

It must've looked good on paper, but bringing Michael Crichton's decade-old novel to the screen turned out to be a big mistake for all involved. Hoffman, Jackson, and Stone are a team of researchers sent underwater to investigate a mysterious 300-year-old space ship. After realizing the ship has American origins, they stumble across a huge liquid metal sphere that can make their deepest fears come true, in the form of huge squids and sea snakes. Never lives up to the promising premise or high-class looks. Despite three mega-stars and an alist director, it's a hollow excursion low on thrills and originality, but there's plenty of existential ramblings about the power of the mind. 152m/C VHS, DVD . Dustin Hoffman, Sharon Stone, Samuel L. Jackson, Peter Coyote, Queen Latifah, Liev Schreiber; D: Barry Levinson; W: Paul Attanasio, Stephen Hauser; C: Adam Greenberg; M: Elliot Goldenthal.

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Sphere

Sphere

A sphere is a three-dimensional figure that is the set of all points equidistant from a fixed point, called the center. The diameter of a sphere is a line segment that passes through the center and whose endpoints lie on the sphere. The radius of a sphere is a line segment whose one endpoint lies on the sphere and whose other endpoint is the center.

A great circle of a sphere is the intersection of a plane that contains the center of the sphere with the sphere. Its diameter is called an axis and the endpoints of the axes are called poles. (Think of the north and south poles on a globe.) A meridian of a sphere is any part of a great circle.

A sphere of radius r has a surface area of 4πr2 and a volume of 4/3π r3.

A sphere is determined by any four points in space that do not lie in the same plane. Thus there is a unique sphere that can be circumscribed around a tetrahedron. The equation in Cartesian coordinates x, y, and z of a sphere with center at (a, b, c) and radius r is (x a)2+ (y b)2+ (z c)2= r2.

See also Geometry.

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Sphere

Sphere

A sphere is a three dimensional figure that is the set of all points equidistant from a fixed point, called the center. The diameter of a sphere is a line segment which passes through the center and whose endpoints lie on the sphere. The radius of a sphere is a line segment whose one endpoint lies on the sphere and whose other endpoint is the center.

A great circle of a sphere is the intersection of a plane that contains the center of the sphere with the sphere. Its diameter is called an axis and the endpoint of the axes are called poles. (Think of the north and south poles on a globe of the earth.) A meridian of a sphere is any part of a great circle.

A sphere of radius r has a surface area of 4π r2 and a volume of 4/3 π r3.

A sphere is determined by any four points in space that do not lie in the same plane. Thus there is a unique sphere that can be circumscribed around a tetrahedron . The equation in Cartesian coordinates x, y, and z of a sphere with center at (a, b, c) and radius r is (x-a)2 + (yb)2 + (z-c)2 = r2.

See also Geometry.

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