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Morse Code ( (table))

Morse Code

Morse Code
International Morse Code
Letters
A · –
B – · · ·
C – · – ·
D – · ·
E ·
F · · – ·
G – – ·
H · · · ·
I · ·
J · – – –
K – · –
L · – · ·
M – –
N – ·
O – – –
P · – – ·
Q – – · –
R · – ·
S · · ·
T
U · · –
V · · · –
W · – –
X – · · –
Y – · – –
Z – – · ·
Numbers and Punctuation
1 · – – – –
2 · · – – –
3 · · · – –
4 · · · · –
5 · · · · ·
6 – · · · ·
7 – – · · ·
8 – – – · ·
9 – – – – ·
0 – – – – –
Period · – · – · –
Comma – – · · – –
American Morse Code
The American Morse differs in the following symbols:
Letters
C · ·  ·
F · – ·
J – · – ·
L ——
O ·  ·
P · · · · ·
Q · · – ·
R ·  · ·
X · – · ·
Y · ·  · ·
Z · · ·  ·
Numbers and Punctuation
1 · – – ·
2 · · – · ·
3 · · · – ·
4 · · · · –
5 – – –
6 · · · · · ·
7 – – · ·
8 – · · · ·
9 – · · –
0 ——
Period · · – – · ·
Comma · – · –

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Morse code

Morse code [for S. F. B. Morse], the arbitrary set of signals used on the telegraph (see code). It may also be used with a flash lamp for visible signaling. The international (or continental) Morse code is a simplified form generally used in radio telegraphy. The American Morse differs from the international Morse in 11 letters, in all the numerals except the numeral 4, and in the punctuation code. The unit of the code is the dot, representing a very brief depression of the telegraph key. The dash represents a depression lasting three times as long as a dot. Between the depressions there is a pause equal in time to one dot, except in a few letters and signs, when there is a wait of two dots. The pause between letters in a word lasts as long as one dash, between words it lasts as long as two dashes. The International Morse code is shown in the table entitled Morse Code. Morse code is now mainly used by amateur (ham) radio operators. The U.S. Coast Guard stopped monitoring Morse code transmissions in 1995 when their use in sending distress calls had been almost entirely superseded by automated systems using satellite relay.

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Morse code

Morse code / ˈmôrs/ • n. an alphabet or code in which letters are represented by combinations of long and short signals of light or sound. • v. [tr.] signal (something) using Morse code.

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Morse

Morse an alphabet or code in which letters are represented by combinations of long and short light or sound signals, named (in the mid 19th century) after Samuel F. B. Morse (1791–1872), American inventor.

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morse

morse1 fastening of a cope. XV. — OF. mors — L. morsus bite, catch, f. mors-, pp. stem of mordēre bite.

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morse

morse2 walrus. XV. ult. — Lappish moršša, whence Finnish morsu, Russ. morzh.

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morse

morse3 signalling code invented by S. F. B. Morse (1791–1872). XIX.

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morse

morsecoarse, corse, course, divorce, endorse (US indorse), enforce, force, gorse, hoarse, horse, morse, Norse, perforce, reinforce, sauce, source, torse •Wilberforce • workforce • packhorse •carthorse • racehorse • sea horse •hobby horse • Whitehorse •sawhorse, warhorse •clothes horse • shire horse •workhorse • racecourse • concourse •intercourse • watercourse •outsource

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