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terminate

ter·mi·nate / ˈtərməˌnāt/ • v. [tr.] bring to an end: he was advised to terminate the contract. ∎  [intr.] (terminate in) (of a thing) have its end at (a specified place) or of (a specified form): the chain terminated in an iron ball covered with spikes. ∎  [intr.] (of a train, bus, or boat service) end its journey: the train will terminate at Stratford. ∎  end (a pregnancy) before term by artificial means. ∎  end the employment of (someone); dismiss: Adamson's putting pressure on me to terminate you. ∎  assassinate (someone, esp. an intelligence agent): he was terminated by persons unknown. ∎ archaic form the physical end or extremity of (an area). PHRASES: terminate someone with extreme prejudice murder or assassinate someone (used as a euphemism).

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termination

termination
1. The end of execution of a process. A process that reaches a successful conclusion terminates normally by issuing a suitable supervisor call to the operating system. See also abnormal termination.

2. of an Ethernet. The device attached to the end of an Ethernet segment that suppresses any reflection from the end of the cable. The terminator is a simple resistor, whose resistance is equal to the characteristic impedance of the cable to which it is attached, standardized as being 50 ohms. The termination totally absorbs any incoming signal, and eliminates reflections back into the segment. See also bus terminator.

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Termination

TERMINATION

Cessation; conclusion; end in time or existence.

When used in connection with litigation, the term signifies the final determination of the action.

The termination or cancellation of a contract signifies the process whereby an end is put to whatever remains to be performed thereunder. It differs from rescission, which refers to the restoration of the parties to the positions they occupied prior to the contract.

The termination of a lease refers to the severance of the landlord and tenant relationship before the leasehold term expires through the ordinary passage of time.

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termination

termination. Label-stop or anything stopping a moulding.

2. Terminal, e.g. finial on a pinnacle or urn on a pedestal.

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terminate

terminateagnate, magnate •incarnate, khanate •impregnate •coordinate, subordinate •decaffeinate • paginate • originate •oxygenate •cachinnate, machinate •pollinate •contaminate, laminate •disseminate, ingeminate, inseminate •discriminate, eliminate, incriminate, recriminate •abominate, dominate, nominate •illuminate, ruminate •fulminate • culminate •exterminate, germinate, terminate, verminate •marinate • peregrinate • indoctrinate •chlorinate • urinate •assassinate, deracinate, fascinate •vaccinate • hallucinate • Latinate •procrastinate • predestinate •agglutinate • rejuvenate • resinate •designate • cognate • neonate •lunate • alienate • carbonate •hibernate • odonate • hyphenate •emanate •impersonate, personate •fractionate • detonate • intonate •consternate • alternate • Italianate •resonate

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