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tag

tag1 / tag/ • n. 1. a label attached to someone or something for the purpose of identification or to give other information. ∎  an electronic device that can be attached to someone or something for monitoring purposes, e.g., to deter shoplifters. ∎  a nickname or description popularly given to someone or something. ∎  a license plate of a motor vehicle. ∎  Comput. a character or set of characters appended to or enclosing an item of data in order to identify it. 2. a small piece or part that is attached to a main body. ∎  a ragged lock of wool on a sheep. ∎  the tip of an animal's tail when it is distinctively colored. ∎  a loose or spare end of something; a leftover. ∎  a metal or plastic point at the end of a shoelace that stiffens it, making it easier to insert through an eyelet. 3. a frequently repeated quotation or stock phrase. ∎  Theater a closing speech addressed to the audience. ∎  the refrain of a song. ∎  a musical phrase added to the end of a piece. ∎  Gram. a short phrase or clause added to an already complete sentence, as in I like it, I do.See also tag question. • v. (tagged , tag·ging ) [tr.] 1. attach a label to: the bears were tagged and released. ∎  [tr.] give a specified name or description to: he left because he didn't want to be tagged as a soap star. ∎  attach an electronic tag to: [as n.] (tagging) laser tattooing is used in the tagging of cattle. ∎  Comput. add a character or set of characters to (an item of data) in order to identify it for later retrieval. ∎  Biol. & Chem. label (something) with a radioactive isotope, fluorescent dye, or other marker: pieces of DNA tagged with radioactive particles. 2. [tr.] add to something, esp. as an afterthought or with no real connection: she meant to tag her question on at the end of her remarks. ∎  [intr.] follow or accompany someone, esp. without invitation: that'll teach you not to tag along where you're not wanted. 3. shear away ragged locks of wool from (sheep). tag2 • n. a children's game in which one chases the rest, and anyone who is touched then becomes the pursuer. ∎  Baseball the action of tagging out a runner or tagging a base: he narrowly avoided a sweeping tag by the first baseman. ∎  [as adj.] denoting a form of wrestling involving tag teams.See tag team. • v. (tagged , tag·ging ) [tr.] touch (someone being chased) in a game of tag. ∎  (tag out) Baseball put out (a runner) by touching them with the ball or with the glove holding the ball: catching their fastest runner in a rundown and tagging him out. ∎ Baseball (of a base runner, or a fielder with the ball) touch (a base) with the foot: the short center fielder could field the ball and tag second base for a force out. ∎  [intr.] (usu. tag up) Baseball (of a base runner) touch the base one has occupied after a fly ball is caught, before running to the next base: when the ball was hit, he went back to the bag to tag up.

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TAG

TAG. A term in LINGUISTICS for several types of structure in which one or more words are tagged on to a clause or sentence, including: (1) Continuation tags. Words and phrases used as shorthand at the end of a list: etc.; and so on; and so forth. (2) Questioning and commenting tags. Questions, questioning words, and commenting words that can be added to statements are common in formal conversation: ‘She's pretty, don't you think?’; ‘You'll pay me back tomorrow, OK?’; ‘It's difficult, I suppose’; ‘You know, it can't be easy for her.’ Such forms can usually be rearranged as standard questions and statements: Don't you think she's pretty?; I suppose (that) it's difficult. (3) Focusing and emphasizing tags. These usually restate the subject and sometimes the verb: ‘She's amazing, (is) my grandmother’; ‘My grandmother, she's amazing’; ‘She's amazing, she is’; ‘She comes here often, does Joan’ (a usage common in the North of England). See LATIN TAG, QUESTION TAG, TAG QUESTION.

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tag

tag
1. To mark in some distinctive fashion any node in a data structure that has been traversed. Using this technique precautions can be taken against revisiting nodes, e.g. in a circular list.

2. Short for tag field. A field that is used to discriminate between variants of the same type.

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tag

tag1 small pendent piece, orig. on a garment XIV (implied in tagged); ornamental pendant XVI; point of metal, etc. at the end of a lace; something appended to a piece of writing, etc., brief quotation XVIII. of unkn. orig.
Hence tag vb. XVI mark with a tag.

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tag

tag a brief and usually familiar quotation added for special effect; a much used quotation or stock phrase. The word in this sense is recorded from the early 18th century.

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Tag

Tag

the rabble; the lowest class of the populace, 1607. See also rag-tag.

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tag

tag2 children's game, otherwise called tig. XVIII of unkn. orig.

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tag

tagbag, blag, brag, Bragg, crag, dag, drag, fag, flag, gag, hag, jag, lag, mag, nag, quag, rag, sag, scrag, shag, slag, snag, sprag, stag, swag, tag, wag, zag •ragbag • saddlebag •handbag, sandbag •gasbag • ratbag • air bag • mailbag •fleabag, tea bag •beanbag • windbag • kitbag • dillybag •carpet bag • washbag • growbag •nosebag •bumbag, scumbag •punchbag • Stalag • jetlag • greylag •gulag • dishrag • bullyrag • Morag •ragtag • dog tag • Sontag • wigwag •chinwag •scallywag (US scallawag) • zigzag

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TAG

TAG Taxon Advisory Group
• (USA) The Adjutant-General

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