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card1 / kärd/ • n. 1. a piece of thick, stiff paper or thin pasteboard, in particular one used for writing or printing on: notes jotted down on a card. ∎  such a piece of thick paper printed with a picture and used to send a message or greeting: a birthday card. ∎  a small piece of such paper with a person's name and other details printed on it for identification, for example a business card. 2. a small rectangular piece of plastic issued by a bank, containing personal data in a machine-readable form and used chiefly to obtain cash or credit. ∎  a similar piece of plastic used for other purposes such as paying for a telephone call or gaining entry to a room or building. 3. a playing card: a deck of cards. ∎  (cards) a game played with playing cards. 4. Comput. short for expansion card. 5. inf. a person regarded as odd or amusing. 6. a program of events at a racetrack. ∎  a record of scores in a sports event; a scorecard. ∎  a list of holes on a golf course, on which a player's scores are entered. • v. [tr.] 1. write (something) on a card, esp. for indexing. 2. check the identity card of (someone), in particular as evidence of legal drinking age. 3. inf. (in golf and other sports) score (a certain number of points on a scorecard): he carded 68 in the final round. PHRASES: hold all the cards be in a very strong or advantageous position. in the cards inf. very possible or likely: an overwhelming military triumph is in the cards. play the —— card exploit the specified issue or idea mentioned, esp. for political advantage: he saw an opportunity to play the peace card. play one's cards right make the best use of one's assets and opportunities. put (or lay) one's cards on the table be completely open and honest. card2 • v. [tr.] comb and clean (raw wool, hemp fibers, or similar material) with a sharp-toothed instrument in order to disentangle the fibers before spinning. • n. a toothed implement or machine for this purpose. DERIVATIVES: card·er n.

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card

card 1 implement orig. consisting of teasel heads set in a frame, for raising the nap on cloth; toothed instrument for combing out fibre. XV. — (O)F. carde — Pr. carda, f. cardar tease, comb :- popL. *caritāre, f. cārere card.
So card vb. XIV.

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"card." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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card

card 2 piece of pasteboard XV; †map, chart XVI. — (with unexpl. d) (O)F. carte — L. charta papyrus leaf, paper (whence F. charte CHART) — Gr. khártēs leaf of papyrus, written work; supposed to be of Egyptian orig.

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card

card a card up one's sleeve a plan in reserve, a hidden advantage (see also have an ace up one's sleeve).

See also house of cards, play the — card.

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card

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card

cardAssad, aubade, avant-garde, backyard, ballade, bard, Bernard, bombard, canard, card, charade, chard, couvade, croustade, Cunard, facade, glissade, guard, hard, ill-starred, interlard, lard, Montagnard, nard, pard, petard, pomade, promenade, regard, retard, rodomontade, roulade, saccade, Sade, salade, sard, shard, unmarred, unscarred, yard •Bayard • galliard • Savoyard •Svalbard •bombarde, Lombard •Goddard • blackguard • vanguard •Asgard • safeguard • Midgard •bodyguard • lifeguard • Bogarde •coastguard • mudguard • rearguard •fireguard • Kierkegaard • diehard •blowhard •Jacquard, placard •flashcard • railcard • racecard • Picard •scorecard • showcard • phonecard •Ballard, mallard •Willard • Abelard • bollard • Barnard •Maynard, reynard •communard • Oudenarde • Stoppard •Gerard • Everard • brassard •Hansard, mansard •Trenchard • Ostade • leotard •boulevard • scrapyard • farmyard •barnyard • graveyard • brickyard •shipyard •dockyard, stockyard •foreyard • courtyard • boatyard •woodyard • junkyard • churchyard

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