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saponin

saponin Any of a class of glycosides, found widely in plants, that have detergent properties and form a lather when shaken with water. They are especially concentrated in the soapwort (Saponaria officinalis), whose foliage was formerly boiled and used as a soap substitute. Chemically saponins consist of a sugar group (e.g. glucose) linked to a steroid or triterpene group; a related group of compounds, the sapogenins, have no sugar group. Their presence in plants is thought to act as a deterrent to herbivores – they are bitter-tasting and cause gastric irritation if ingested. They are also highly toxic to fish. If injected into the bloodstream they disrupt red cells, through their effects on plasma membranes.

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saponin

saponin Any member of a class of glycosides that form colloidal (see COLLOID) solutions in water and foam when shaken. Saponins have a bitter taste, hydrolyse (see HYDROLYSIS) red blood cells, and are very toxic to fish. They occur in a wide variety of plants, including Saponaria officinalis (soapwort), which produces a lathery liquid, once widely used for washing wool and still used for delicate textiles, including antique ones.

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"saponin." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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saponin

saponin Any member of a class of glycosides that form colloidal solutions in water and foam when shaken. Saponins have a bitter taste, hydrolyse red blood cells, and are very toxic to fish. They occur in a wide variety of plants, including Saponaria officinalis (soapwort), which produces a lathery liquid, once widely used for washing wool and still used for delicate textiles, including antique ones.

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"saponin." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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saponin

sap·o·nin / ˈsapənən/ • n. Chem. a toxic compound that is present in soapwort and makes foam when shaken with water. ∎  any of the class of steroid and terpenoid glycosides typified by this, examples of which are used in detergents and foam fire extinguishers.

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"saponin." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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saponin

saponin: see soap plant.

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"saponin." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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