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rick

rick1 / rik/ • n. a stack of hay, corn, straw, or similar material, esp. one built into a regular shape and thatched. ∎  a pile of firewood somewhat smaller than a cord. ∎  a set of shelving for storing barrels. • v. [tr.] form into rick or ricks; stack: the nine cords of good spruce wood ricked up in the back yard. rick2 • n. a slight sprain or strain, esp. in a person's neck or back. • v. [tr.] strain (one's neck or back) slightly.

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Rick

Rick

a heap or pile; a stack of hay, corn, peas, etc., especially one built and thatched. See also mow.

Examples : rick of bricks, 1703; of coal, 1881; of corn, 1382; of grain; of peas; of snow, 1886; of straw, 1589; of wheat, 1557; hayrick, 1895.

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rick

rick1 stack of hay, etc. OE. hrēac = MDu. rooc, roke (Du. rook), ON. hraukr, of unkn. orig.

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rick

rick2 sprain, wrench XVIII; var. of WRICK.

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rick

rickartic, brick, chick, click, crick, dick, flick, hand-pick, hic, hick, kick, lick, mick, miskick, nick, pic, pick, prick, quick, rick, shtick, sic, sick, slick, snick, spic, stick, thick, tic, tick, trick, Vic, wick •alcaic, algebraic, Aramaic, archaic, choleraic, Cyrenaic, deltaic, formulaic, Hebraic, Judaic, Mishnaic, Mithraic, mosaic, Pharisaic, prosaic, Ptolemaic, Romaic, spondaic, stanzaic, trochaic •logorrhoeic (US logorrheic), mythopoeic, onomatopoeic •echoic, heroic, Mesozoic, Palaeozoic (US Paleozoic), Stoic •Bewick •disyllabic, monosyllabic, polysyllabic, syllabic •choriambic, dithyrambic, iambic •alembic •amoebic (US amebic) •aerobic, agoraphobic, claustrophobic, homophobic, hydrophobic, phobic, technophobic, xenophobic •cherubic, cubic, pubic •Arabic, Mozarabic •acerbic • apparatchik • dabchick •peachick

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Rick

Rick ★★½ 2003 (R)

Drawing from Verdi's “Rigoletto,” the widower Rick is a detestable corporate exec who despises his annoying and much younger boss Duke yet degrades himself to score points. He's pushed past the breaking point when he learns that the punk has been sex-chatting online with his teenage daughter and figures putting a hit out on him is the only answer. 93m/C VHS, DVD . Bill Pullman, Aaron Stanford, Agnes Bruckner, Sandra Oh, Dylan Baker, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Marianne Hagan, Jamie Harris, Paz de la Huerta, P.J. Brown, Haviland (Haylie) Morris, Dan Moran, Jerome Preston Bates, Marin Rathje, William Ryall, Daniel Handler, Dennis Parlato, Todd A. Kovner, Kimberly Anne Thompson, Vita Haas, Ben Hauck; W: Daniel Handler; C: Lisa Rinzler; M: Ted Reichman. VIDEO

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