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dodo

do·do / ˈdōdō/ • n. (pl. -os or -oes) an extinct flightless bird (Raphus cucullatus, family Raphidae) with a stout body, stumpy wings, a large head, and a heavy hooked bill. It was found on Mauritius until the end of the 17th century. ∎ inf. an old-fashioned and ineffective person or thing.

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dodo

dodo Extinct, flightless bird that lived on the Mascarene Islands in the Indian Ocean. The last dodo died in c.1790. The true dodo (Raphus cucullatus) of Mauritius and the similar Réunion solitaire (Raphus solitarius) were heavy-bodied birds with large heads and large hooked bills. Weight: to 23kg (50lb).

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dodo

dodo a large extinct flightless bird with a stout body, which was found on Mauritius until the end of the 17th century. The name, recorded from the early 17th century, comes from Portuguese doudo ‘simpleton’, because the bird had no fear of man and was easily killed.

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dodo

dodo XVII. — Pg. doudo simpleton. fool;,applied to the bird because of its clumsy appearance.

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Dodo (in the Bible)

Dodo (dō´dō), in the Bible, father of the mighty man Eleazar. An alternate form is Dodai.

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dodo (extinct bird)

dodo, a flightless forest-dwelling bird of Mauritius, extinct since the late 17th cent. The dodo was closely related to the two species of solitaire bird, extinct flightless giants found on the other islands in the Mascarene Islands. Although related to the pigeon, the dodo was larger than the wild turkey. The plumage was dark gray with a whitish breast, tail, and wings, and the large black bill had a horny terminal cap. The dodo laid only one egg at a time, on the ground. Although the bird's flesh was tough and unpalatable, European sailors and the pigs and rats they brought to Mauritius slaughtered the birds and destroyed its eggs, and it became extinct in roughly 50 years. The dodo appears in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, where it may be the author's surrogate.

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dodo

dodoforeshadow, shadow •Faldo •accelerando, bandeau, Brando, glissando, Orlando •eyeshadow •aficionado, amontillado, avocado, Bardo, Barnardo, bastinado, bravado, Colorado, desperado, Dorado, eldorado, incommunicado, Leonardo, Mikado, muscovado, Prado, renegado, Ricardo, stifado •commando •eddo, Edo, meadow •crescendo, diminuendo, innuendo, kendo •carbonado, dado, Feydeau, gambado, Oviedo, Toledo, tornado •aikido, bushido, credo, Guido, Ido, libido, lido, speedo, teredo, torpedo, tuxedo •widow • dildo • window •Dido, Fido, Hokkaidocondo, rondeau, rondo, secondo, tondo •Waldo •dodo, Komodo, Quasimodo •escudo, judo, ludo, pseudo, testudo, Trudeau •weirdo • sourdough • fricandeau •tournedos • Murdo

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