Dodman, Nicholas H. 1946-

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DODMAN, Nicholas H. 1946-

PERSONAL:

Born January 29, 1946, in London, England; son of Gwendoline Dodman; married Linda Breitman (a veterinarian), June 24, 1989; children: Stevie, Victoria, Keisha, Daniel. Ethnicity: "Caucasian." Education: Glasgow University, Scotland, B.V. M.S., 1970.

ADDRESSES:

Home—200 Wesiboro Rd., North Grafton, MA 01536. Office—Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Rd., North Grafton, MA 01536. Agent—Mary Hall Mayer, The Hall Agency, Eleventh Floor, 69 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Veterinarian, educator, and author. Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA, professor and director of Tufts University Animal Behavior Clinic, 1982—; PetPlace.com, consultant; Veterinary Center PETFAX, consultant.

MEMBER:

American Veterinary Medical Association, American College of Veterinary Behaviorists.

WRITINGS:

The Dog Who Loved Too Much: Tales, Treatments, and the Psychology of Dogs, Bantam Books (New York, NY), 1995.

The Cat Who Cried for Help: Attitudes, Emotions, and the Psychology of Cats, Bantam Books (New York, NY), 1997.

(Editor, with Louis Shuster) Psychopharmacology of Animal Behavior Disorders, Blackwell Science (Malden, MA), 1998.

Dogs Behaving Badly: An A to Z Guide to Understanding and Curing Behavior Problems in Dogs, Bantam Books (New York, NY), 1999.

If Only They Could Speak: Stories about Pets and Their People, Norton (New York, NY), 2002.

Author of scientific studies.

ADAPTATIONS:

The Dog Who Loved Too Much was adapted for audiocassette by Audio Literature, 1995.

WORK IN PROGRESS:

Research on obsessive-compulsive disorders in animals.

SIDELIGHTS:

A leading researcher in animal behavior, veterinarian Nicholas H. Dodman has directed the Tufts University Animal Behavior Clinic for over two decades. His work has led to the creation of humane therapies for problem dogs and cats. As Dodman told CA, he has been influenced by fellow graduate of Glasgow University veterinarian James Herriot and by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. The impetus behind his writing was his realization of "a tremendous need for true, scientific information about behavior problem management. I also wanted owners of pets with behavior problems to know where to go to get help and to know that they aren't alone." Dodman advocates an approach that uses behavior management techniques based on understanding the individual pet's personality and species characteristics as well as environmental factors particular to the individual pet.

Booklist critic Nancy Bent called Dogs Behaving Badly: An A to Z Guide to Understanding and Curing Behavior Problems in Dogs "extremely user-friendly." Bent stated that Dodman's "accessible writing style makes difficult concepts easy to understand." Focusing on how animals attempt to communicate through their behavior, Dodman discusses animal aggression, noise phobia, elimination problems, obsessive licking, irrational fears, separation anxiety, and aging.

"I write to spread the word about effective therapies for pet animal behavior problems," Dodman told CA. "Too many pets die prematurely (are 'put to sleep') because of behavioral problems that their owners erroneously assume are untreatable. It is estimated that five to ten million dogs and cats are euthanized annually in the nation's shelters and pounds, with unacceptable behavior being the primary reason for their relinquishment or surrender." In addition to his work at the veterinary laboratory, Dodman does consulting through the toll-free line PETFAX and on the Internet at PetPlace.com.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Animals, July, 1999, Paula Abend, review of Dogs Behaving Badly: An A to Z Guide to Understanding and Curing Behavior Problems in Dogs, p. 37.

Booklist, March 15, 1996, Jennifer Henderson, review of The Dog Who Loved Too Much: Tales, Treatments, and the Psychology of Dogs, p. 1230; October 15, 1996, Ted Hipple, review of The Dog Who Loved Too Much, pp. 444-445; February 15, 1999, Nancy Bent, review of Dogs Behaving Badly, p. 1019; July, 2002, Carol Haggas, review of If Only They Could Speak: Stories about Pets and Their People, p. 1806.

Library Journal, February 15, 1999, Deborah Emerson, review of Dogs Behaving Badly, p. 176.

Science News, January 4, 2003, review of If Only They Could Speak, p. 15.

Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), July 24, 2000, review of Dogs Behaving Badly, section C, p. 5.