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mulch

mulch / məlch/ • n. a material (such as decaying leaves, bark, or compost) spread around or over a plant to enrich or insulate the soil. ∎  an application of such a material: regular mulches keep down annual weeds. ∎  a formless mass or pulp: a mulch of sodden brown stems. • v. [intr.] apply a mulch. ∎  [tr.] treat or cover with mulch.

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"mulch." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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mulch

mulch, any material, usually organic, that is spread on the ground to protect the soil and the roots of plants from the effects of soil crusting, erosion, or freezing; it is also used to retard the growth of weeds. A mulch may be made of materials such as straw, sawdust, grass clippings, peat moss, leaves, or paper. For large areas under cultivation a tilled layer of soil serves the purpose of a mulch.

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"mulch." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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mulch

mulch half-rotten straw. XVII. sb. use of mulsh adj. (XV) soft, (dial.) of ‘soft’ weather, rel. to (dial.) melsh mellow, soft, mild (XIV):- OE. mel(i)sċ, mil(i)sċ, mylsċ, f. *mel- *mul- (whence also MHG. molwic, G. mollig, etc. soft, OHG. molawēn be soft, cogn. with L. mollis tender); see -ISH1.

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mulch

mulch A loose surface soil horizon, either natural or man-made, composed of organic or mineral materials. It protects soil and plant roots from the impact of rain, temperature change, or evaporation.

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"mulch." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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mulch

mulch A loose surface soil horizon, either natural or man-made, composed of organic or mineral materials. It protects soil and plant roots from the impact of rain, temperature change, or evaporation.

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"mulch." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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mulch

mulch •welsh • milch • Walsh • mulch

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"mulch." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Mulch

Mulch

Material applied to the surface of a soil to protect the soil or to improve the environment of the soil's surface. Mulch can be made from many different kinds of organic or inorganic materials like stones, bark, compost, leaves, wood chips, and manure. The benefits of using mulch include the following: protection of soil from erosion , evaporation reduction, increased water infiltration , reduction in weed seed germination, increased seed germination, and reduction of compaction of soil.

See also Animal waste; Composting; Fertilizer; Soil organic matter; Soil texture; Topsoil

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"Mulch." Environmental Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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