Ludlow

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Roger Ludlow, b. 1590, d. after 1664, one of the founders of Connecticut, b. England. Educated at Oxford and admitted to the Inner Temple to study law, he was elected (1630) an assistant of the Massachusetts Bay Company and in the same year sailed to America. He was one of the founders of Dorchester, Mass., and served (1634) as deputy governor of Massachusetts. Moving to the new settlements along the Connecticut River, he presided (1636) at Windsor over the first court held in Connecticut and is credited with the final drafting of the Fundamental Orders, adopted by the colony in 1639. He also completed the first codification of Connecticut laws, known as Ludlow's Code or the Code of 1650. In 1639 he founded the settlement of Fairfield, Conn., and for many years served as a magistrate and deputy governor of Connecticut. He represented (1651–53) the colony in the New England Confederation. Disagreement over his proposed expedition against the Dutch settlers of New Netherland caused him to return (1654) to England, after which he settled in Ireland.

See biography by J. M. Taylor (1900).

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Ludlow, Roger (1590–1664) English colonist in North America. He helped found Dorchester, Massachusetts, and became deputy governor of Massachusetts in 1634. He presided over the first Connecticut court at Windsor in 1636 and evolved the state's first codified laws, known as Ludlow's Code. He returned to England in 1654.

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Ludlow A series (424–408 Ma) of the Upper Silurian, underlain by the Wenlock and overlain by the Pridoli.

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Ludlow, town (1990 pop. 18,820), Hampden co., SW Mass., on the Chicopee River; settled c.1750, set off from Springfield 1774, inc. 1775. It is a residential suburb of Springfield and Chicopee. Industrial molds, plastic products, and twine are produced.