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Dodge City

DODGE CITY

DODGE CITY. Located on the Arkansas River in southwestern Kansas, Dodge City owes its location and much of its initial economic activity to its position as a "break in transport" where different forms of transportation meet. In September 1872, when the Santa Fe Railroad reached a point five miles east of Fort Dodge, a settlement originally known as Buffalo City emerged. For several years, hunters hauled bison hides by the cartload to Dodge City. By the late 1870s, ranchers were driving their cattle to Dodge City, whence they were shipped to feed lots and markets in the East. In 2000, Dodge City remained a regional center of the trade in livestock and other agricultural products, and its population was 25,176.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Haywood, C. Robert. The Merchant Prince of Dodge City: The Life and Times of Robert M. Wright. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1998.

Andrew C.Isenberg

See alsoArkansas River ; Cattle Drives ; Cowboys ; Kansas ; andpicture (overleaf).


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Dodge City

Dodge City, city (1990 pop. 21,129), seat of Ford co., SW Kans., on the Arkansas River; inc. 1875. The distribution center for a wheat and livestock producing area, it also packs meat and makes agricultural implements. Laid out in 1872 near Fort Dodge (1864) on the old Santa Fe Trail, it flourished as a Santa Fe railhead and became a wild cow town; Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson were among those who helped to curb lawlessness. Fort Dodge has become a soldiers' home. The city hall, formerly located on Boot Hill, an early cowboy burial ground, has been removed to permit enlargement of that tourist attraction. Front Street, with its famous Long Branch Saloon, has been restored. The city holds an annual rodeo.

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