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probe

probe / prōb/ • n. a blunt-ended surgical instrument used for exploring a wound or part of the body. ∎  a small device, esp. an electrode, used for measuring, testing, or obtaining information. ∎  a projecting device for engaging in a drogue, either on an aircraft for use in inflight refueling or on a spacecraft for use in docking with another craft. ∎  (also space probe) an unmanned exploratory spacecraft designed to transmit information about its environment. ∎  an investigation into a crime or other matter: a probe into the maritime industry by the FBI. • v. [tr.] physically explore or examine (something) with the hands or an instrument: researchers probing the digestive glands of mollusks. ∎  [intr.] seek to uncover information about someone or something: he began to probe into Donald's whereabouts| [tr.] police are probing another murder. DERIVATIVES: prob·er n. prob·ing·ly adv.

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"probe." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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probe

probe In genetics, a sample of radioactively labelled nucleic acid that is used in molecular hybridization to detect complementary sequences in the presence of a large amount of non-complementary DNA. The position of the probe may be detected by autoradiography.

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probe

probe (prohb) n. a thin rod of pliable metal with a blunt swollen end. The instrument is used for exploring cavities, wounds, fistulae, or sinus channels. ultrasound p. see transducer, ultrasonography. See also heater-probe.

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Probe (Woonsocket) (Magazine)

Probe (Woonsocket) (Magazine)

Quarterly newsstand magazine concerned with controversial phenomena which was edited by Joseph L. Ferriere and published in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, in the 1970s.

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probe

probe blunt instrument for exploring wounds, etc. XVI. — late L. proba proof, medL. examination, f. probāre test, PROVE
; hence probe vb. XVII.

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probe

probedaube, enrobe, globe, Job, lobe, probe, robe, strobe •Anglophobe • technophobe •homophobe • xenophobe • earlobe •bathrobe • microbe • wardrobe

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