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Azazel

Azazel

A demon of the second order, guardian of the goat. At the feast of expiation, which the ancient Jews celebrated on the tenth day of the seventh month, two goats were led to the high priest, who drew lots for them, the one for the Lord, the other for Azazel. The one on which the lot of the Lord fell was sacrificed, and his blood served for expiation. The high priest then put his two hands on the head of the other, confessed his sins and those of the people, charged the animal with them, and allowed him to be led into the desert and set free. And the people, having left the care of their iniquities to the goat of Azazelalso known as the scapegoatreturn home with clean consciences.

According to Milton, Azazel is the principal standard bearer of the infernal armies. It was also the name of the demon used by Mark the heretic for his magic spells.

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Azazel

Azazel. Place to which the scapegoat was consigned on the Day of Atonement. There is a dispute as to the exact meaning of Azazel; some rabbis identified it as a cliff or a place of rocks, while others saw it as a supernatural power, perhaps made up of two fallen angels, Uza and Azael. ‘Go to Azazel!’ is the equivalent in modern Hebrew of ‘Go to hell!’

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Azazel

Azazel (əzā´zəl, ăz´əzĕl), in the Bible, an obscure term found in the ritual of the scapegoat in the Book of Leviticus. Azazel may be the place to which the scapegoat was sent, the scapegoat itself, or the desert demon to whom the scapegoat was sent. Most modern commentators prefer the last explanation. The name is later applied to a demon in 1 Enoch and to the devil in Islam.

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