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Gematria

Gematria

A form of numerology. In Jewish mysticism gematria was the study of Hebrew letters in association with numbers. The method was used to discover hidden meanings in Hebrew words. Prominent words could be systematically converted into numbers and linked to other words with the same numerical value, which were then regarded as comments upon the original words. This kind of numerology was also used with the Greek alphabet.

A related system of gematria is Notarikon, in which letters taken from phrases form mystical acronyms, or words are developed into mystical phrases. A more complicated procedure is temurah, in which letters of words are transposed or replaced according to complex rules. Some modern occultists have applied gematria to the tarot cards, associating the 22 trump cards with the Hebrew letters, a practice suggested by Éliphas Lévi, author of The History of Magic (1913).

Gematria became an integral part of modern ceremonial magic as practiced in the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and by Aleister Crowley. Crowley and William Westcott of the Golden Dawn wrote several books on the subject, and Crowley published a key word guide to numerological meanings of words titled 777.

Sources:

Bond, Bligh, and Thomas Simcox Lea. Gematria: A Preliminary Investigation of the Cabala. London: Research into Lost Knowledge Organization, 1977.

Crowley, Aleister. 777. London: Walter Scott Publishing, 1909. Revised as 777 Revised. London: Neptune Press, 1952.

Ginsburg, Christian D. The Kabbalah (with The Essenes ). London: Routledge, 1863. Reprint, New York: Samuel Weiser, 1970.

Kozminsky, Isidore. NumbersTheir Meaning and Magic. New York: Samuel Weiser, n.d.

Westcott, William W. An Introduction to the Study of the Kabalah. New York: Allied Publications, n.d.

. Numbers: Their Occult Power and Mystic Virtues. New York: Allied Publications, n.d.

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Gematria

Gematria (Heb., gimatriyya, from Gk., geometria). Use or study of hidden meanings through numbers, especially the numerical equivalence of letters. Gematria was much employed by the kabbalists and was used to prove the messiahship of Shabbetai Zevi. Despite criticism, its use was widespread in both Sephardi and Ashkenazi circles.

In Islam, the equivalent techniques are known as ʿilm ul-ḥurūf, based on abjad (the numerical values of the letters). Thus Adam and Eve are specially related to God because their names = the Divine Name (of Allāh).

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gematria

gematriabarrier, carrier, farrier, harrier, tarrier •Calabria, Cantabria •Andrea • Kshatriya • Bactria •Amu Darya, aria, Zaria •Alexandria •Ferrier, terrier •destrier •aquaria, area, armamentaria, Bavaria, Bulgaria, caldaria, cineraria, columbaria, filaria, frigidaria, Gran Canaria, herbaria, honoraria, malaria, pulmonaria, rosaria, sacraria, Samaria, solaria, tepidaria, terraria •atria, gematria •Assyria, Illyria, Styria, SyriaLaurier, warrior •hypochondria, mitochondria •Austria •auditoria, ciboria, conservatoria, crematoria, emporia, euphoria, Gloria, moratoria, phantasmagoria, Pretoria, sanatoria, scriptoria, sudatoria, victoria, Vitoria, vomitoria •Maurya •courier, Fourier •currier, furrier, spurrier, worrier •Cumbria, Northumbria, Umbria •Algeria, anterior, bacteria, Bashkiria, cafeteria, criteria, cryptomeria, diphtheria, exterior, hysteria, Iberia, inferior, interior, Liberia, listeria, Nigeria, posterior, Siberia, superior, ulterior, wisteria •Etruria, Liguria, Manchuria, Surya

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