Skip to main content
Select Source:

Coke, Thomas William, 1st earl of Leicester

Coke, Thomas William, 1st earl of Leicester (1754–1842). ‘Coke of Norfolk’ was an assertively Whig MP for Norfolk for over 50 years; there were two short intervals, when political excitement overwhelmed his local influence as a large landowner. He is remembered as an agricultural improver. Especially on the sandy soils of north-western Norfolk, new crop rotations raised production: turnips (winter food for sheep) preceded grain, followed by sown grass (summer food for sheep) leading again to grain; sheep fertilized for wheat and barley. Publicity for Coke's work and his agricultural shows (‘sheep shearings’), where tenants mingled with prominent radicals and Whigs, has caused neglect of the agricultural improvements of his great-uncle Thomas Coke (1697–1759), Viscount Lovell (1728) and earl of Leicester (1744), who followed earlier aristocratic fashions, collected humanistic manuscripts and Roman and Italian art, and patronized architecture, building Holkham Hall. He profited from Walpolean Whig connections in government; Coke of Norfolk's popularity among his tenantry enabled him, by contrast, vigorously to oppose governmental influence.

R. A. C. Parker

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Coke, Thomas William, 1st earl of Leicester." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Coke, Thomas William, 1st earl of Leicester." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 12, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/coke-thomas-william-1st-earl-leicester

"Coke, Thomas William, 1st earl of Leicester." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved September 12, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/coke-thomas-william-1st-earl-leicester

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Coke, Thomas William

Thomas William Coke (kŏŏk), 1752–1842, English agricultural reformer. Created earl of Leicester of Holkham in 1837, he was known as Coke of Holkham. He improved breeds of cattle, sheep, and hogs on his country estate and greatly promoted improved methods of breeding and husbandry.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Coke, Thomas William." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Coke, Thomas William." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 12, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/coke-thomas-william

"Coke, Thomas William." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 12, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/coke-thomas-william

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.