Skip to main content
Select Source:

Keble, John

John Keble (kē´bəl), 1792–1866, English clergyman and poet. His career (1807–11) at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, was one of unusual distinction. Made fellow of Oriel College in 1811 and ordained in 1816, he became tutor and examiner, but resigned in 1823 to become his father's curate. He based the doctrine and devotion of his important poetical work The Christian Year (1827) on the Book of Common Prayer. It sold 150 editions in 50 years and led to a professorship of poetry at Oxford (1831–41). Alarmed at the suppression of 10 bishoprics in Ireland, Keble preached (1833) a sermon that he called "National Apostasy." J. H. Newman later called this the beginning of the Oxford movement. From 1836 he held the living of Hursley, Hampshire. His works include an edition of Richard Hooker's works (1836), a life of Bishop Wilson (1863), the Oxford Psalter (1839) and Lyra Innocentium: Thoughts in Verse on Children (1846). Among his poems are the well-known hymns Red o'er the Forest, New Every Morning Is Thy Love, and Sun of My Soul.

See biographies by J. T. Coleridge (1869) and W. Lock (1892); study by G. Battiscombe (1964).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Keble, John." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Keble, John." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 19, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/keble-john

"Keble, John." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/keble-john

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Keble, John

Keble, John (1792–1866). Credited with launching the Oxford movement with his Assize Sermon of 1833, Keble spent most of his life as a country parson. The sermon was provoked by the moderate reform of the Irish Church Temporalities Act, which to Keble represented a sacrilegious interference with church order by the secular power. He was heeded as a man of deep spirituality and the author of the much-loved volume of religious verse, The Christian Year (1827), and struck a chord with the growing high-church party seeking a more spiritual view of the Church of England. Keble was brought up in a clerical family near Fairford in Gloucestershire in the high-church tradition of the Caroline divines. At Oxford he was regarded as a brilliant intellect and was professor of poetry (1831–5) until he married and left Oxford for the parish of Hursley in Hampshire, where he spent the rest of his life.

Judith Champ

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Keble, John." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Keble, John." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 19, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/keble-john

"Keble, John." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved September 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/keble-john

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Keble, John

KEBLE, JOHN

Anglican theologian, leader of the oxford movement; b. Fairford, England, April 25, 1792; d. Bournemouth, March 29, 1866. He was the son of John and Sarah (Maule) Keble. After study at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, he was elected a fellow of Oriel College (1811). Ordained to the Anglican priesthood in 1816, he renounced his tutorship at Oriel in 1823 and devoted the rest of his life to parochial work, principally at Hursley. He maintained contact with Oxford, however, holding a professorship of poetry there (183141). Among the Oxford students who were converted to his high church views was Richard Hurrell froude, who acted as intermediary in drawing Keble and John Henry newman together. Newman regarded Keble's sermon, "National Apostasy," delivered at Oxford on July 14, 1833, as the beginning of the Oxford Movement. Keble's contributions to the movement included a book of poetry, The Christian Year (1827), which portrayed the Church as the visible channel of invisible grace; seven of the Tracts for the Times; and a translation of St. Irenaeus for the Library of the Fathers. He also helped to edit Froude's Remains (1837) and the Works of Richard Hooker (1836). After Newman's conversion Keble continued his sermons in defense of tractarianism and advocated the adoration of the sacred species in his work, On Eucharistical Adoration (1857). His influence on the Oxford Movement was exerted chiefly through his qualities as a humble pastor. Keble College at Oxford was named for him in 1869.

Bibliography: g. battiscombe, John Keble: A Study in Limitations (New York 1964). j. t. coleridge, A Memoir of the Rev. John Keble (London 1869).

[t. s. bokenkotter]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Keble, John." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Keble, John." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 19, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/keble-john

"Keble, John." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Retrieved September 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/keble-john

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.