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Dance, George, sen.

Dance, George, sen. (1695–1768). London mason, monumental sculptor, builder, and architect. He collaborated with his father-in-law, James Gould (d. 1734), in the erection of St Botolph's Church, Bishopsgate, London (1725–8). In 1735 he was appointed Clerk of the Works to the City of London, and designed the Mansion House (1739–42) with its grand Egyptian Hall, probably his best work. His other buildings have influences from Gibbs, Palladianism, and Wren, of which St Leonard's Church, Shoreditch (1736–40), with a steeple design clearly based on the precedent of Wren's St Mary-le-Bow (completed 1680), is the best example. He also rebuilt the nave of St Mary's Church, Faversham, Kent (1754–5), and designed the Market House, Coleraine, Co. Londonderry, for The Honourable The Irish Society (c.1740–3—demolished).

Bibliography

Colvin (1995);
J. Curl (2000);
Geffrye Museum 1972);
Perks (1922);
Stroud (1971)

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Dance, George

George Dance, the elder, 1695–1768, English architect. Among his public buildings in London, the most important is the Mansion House (1739–52), an example of the neo-Palladian style. He built the churches of St. Botolph, Aldgate, and St. Leonard, Shoreditch. His son, George Dance, the younger, 1741–1825, also an architect, studied in Italy. In 1768 he became one of the four original members of the Royal Academy. He was a powerful and inventive designer, as evidenced in his renowned Newgate Prison (1770–78). Among his many other London works were designs for Finsbury Square and for Alfred Place and Crescent. Sir John Soane was his pupil.

See study by D. Stroud (1972).

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