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Edmund I

Edmund I (c.922–46), king of England (939–46). Edmund succeeded his brother Athelstan in 939. His prestige as a young warrior-prince who had fought victoriously by the side of his brother at Brunanburh (937), and the evidence of his law codes, suggests potential greatness as a ruler, but at the age of only 24 or 25 he was murdered by a private enemy at Pucklechurch (Glos.) on 26 May 946. Politically he had to face a revival of Scandinavian ambitions in the north. Olaf Guthfrithsson, king of Dublin (d. 941), invaded and forced Edmund, after arbitration which involved the archbishops, to yield control of much of northern England including the thriving Anglo-Danish community at York. Edmund found Olaf's cousin and successor Olaf Sihtricsson easier to deal with. He recovered the territory of the ‘five boroughs’ (Lincoln, Nottingham, Derby, Stamford, and Leicester) in 942 when the Anglo-Danish inhabitants of that area clearly preferred the rule of the Christian West Saxon king to the more backward rule of the Irish/Scandinavian overlords. By the end of his reign Edmund had regained (temporarily, it is true) York and Northumbria, and had even started to take direct interest in continental affairs on behalf of his nephew, the French king Louis d'Outremer.

Henry Loyn

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Gaines, Edmund Pendleton

Edmund Pendleton Gaines, 1777–1849, U.S. army officer, b. Culpeper co., Va.; brother of George Strother Gaines. He spent his boyhood in Tennessee and at the age of 22 joined the U.S. army. He surveyed (1801–4) Gaines Trace between Nashville and Natchez. In 1807 he arrested Aaron Burr and then testified at the Burr trial in Richmond. For his service in the War of 1812 he received many citations. Sent as a commissioner to negotiate with the Creek, he served under Andrew Jackson in the Creek and Seminole campaigns. He later took part in the Black Hawk War and led an expedition against the Seminole in Florida. There he fell into dispute with Gen. Winfield Scott, and a court of inquiry censured them both. In command of the Western Dept. of the army at the opening of the Mexican War, Gaines faced a court of inquiry for calling for volunteers on his own authority. He defended himself so ably that the charges were dismissed.

See biography by J. W. Silver (1949).

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Edmund I

Edmund I (921?–46) King of Wessex (939–46). Faced with a Viking invasion, relinquished Northumbria and much of the e Midlands. Between 942 and 944, he regained most of the territory and reunited the kingdom.

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