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peyote

peyote (pāō´tē), spineless cactus (Lophophora williamsii), ingested by indigenous people in Mexico and the United States to produce visions. The plant is native to the SW United States, particularly S Texas, and Mexico, where it grows in dry soil. The plant is light blue-green, bears small pink flowers, and has a carrot-shaped root. The mushroomlike crown, called a peyote, or mescal, button (but unrelated to the liquor mescal), is cut off, and chewed, brewed into a concoction for drinking, or rolled into pellets to be swallowed. The active substance in peyote is mescaline, one of several naturally occurring hallucinogenic drugs. An alkaloid, mescaline tastes bitter, causes an initial feeling of nausea, then produces visions and changes in perception, time sense, and mood. There are no uncomfortable aftereffects, and the drug is not physiologically habit-forming.

Peyote has been used by Native Americans since pre-Columbian times and was regarded as a panacea. It is important in the Native American Church, which fused Christian doctrine with peyote-eating tribal ritual. The use of peyote is said to produce a mental state that allows celebrants to feel closer to their ancestors and their Creator. In 1970, the state of Texas legalized peyote for use by Native Americans in religious ceremonies; a federal law confirming this protection was enacted in 1995. Aside from this use, peyote is a controlled substance, illegal in all 50 states.

See W. La Barre, The Peyote Cult (rev. ed. 1969).

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Peyote

Peyote. A hallucinogenic cactus and the basis of an inter-tribal religion among N. American Indians. It grows only in the Rio Grande valley and N. Mexico, and has long been central in local rites. Peyote brings peace and healing, resists alcoholism, and gives visions of the Peyote Spirit who is regarded either as Jesus or an Indian equivalent.

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peyote

peyote (mescal) Either of two species of cactus of the genus Laphophora that grow in the USA. The soft-stemmed L. williamsii has pink or white flowers in summer and a blue-green stem. L. diffusa has white or yellow flowers. Peyote contains many alkaloids, the principal one being mescaline, a hallucinogenic drug.

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peyote

pe·yo·te / pāˈyōtē/ • n. a small, soft, blue-green, spineless cactus (Lophophora williamsii), native to Mexico and the southern US. Also called mescal. ∎  a hallucinogenic drug prepared from this cactus, containing mescaline.

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peyote

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