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tourniquet

tourniquet (tŏŏr´nĬkĕt, –kā, tûr´–), compression device used to cut off the flow of blood to a part of the body, most often an arm or leg. It may be a special surgical instrument, a rubber tube, a strip of cloth, or any flexible material that can be tightened to exert pressure. Compression should not be maintained for more than 20 min at a time because of the danger of congestion and gangrene. In cases of a bleeding emergency, a tourniquet is used to stop the flow of blood if other means, e.g., the application of a pressure bandage to the wound, are not effective. In arterial hemorrhage (bright red blood spurting out in jets) the tourniquet is applied above the wound, i.e., between the wound and the heart. In hemorrhage from a vein (an even flow of dark red blood) the tourniquet is applied below the wound, i.e., away from the heart.

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tourniquet

tourniquet (toor-ni-kay) n. a device to press upon an artery and prevent flow of blood through it, usually a cord, rubber tube, or tight bandage. Tourniquets are no longer recommended as a first-aid measure to stop bleeding from a wound; direct pressure on the wound itself is considered less harmful.

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tourniquet

tour·ni·quet / ˈtərnikit; ˈtoŏr-/ • n. a device for stopping the flow of blood through an artery, typically by compressing a limb with a cord or tight bandage.

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tourniquet

tourniquet XVII. — F., taken to be alt. of OF. tournicle, var. of t(o)unicle coat of mail, by assoc. with tourner TURN.

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tourniquet

tourniquet •parquet •appliqué, piqué •Biscay, risqué •communiqué • tourniquet • sobriquet •manqué •cloqué, croquet •Malplaquet

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